Cash Sale Transaction

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sueh

Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2017
Posts
23
Location
Ohio
Hello,

    We plan to purchase a park model that is already on a lot with cash/check. I was wondering if the owner needs to get the title notarized since the RV is a Park Model and does not need moved.
Thanks for any advice!
Sue
 

Alfa38User

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Oct 4, 2007
Posts
6,676
I am "assuming" the trailer pictured is the trailer in question!!

You will need a title in your name (and perhaps a tag) and, most likely, taxes to be paid on the sale regardless. A trailer is still a vehicle whether it moves or not and the title will most certainly be required if you wish to sell it later. Whether the application needs notarizing or not will likely be dependent on the state and/or county involved. Trailers similar to that where we are (FL), require up-to-date yearly tags although I have never seen anyone checking for that in our campground. In FL, I did not need a notarized title when I bought mine, just the original title document signed over to me and a receipt from the seller.

Cash purchase has nothing to do with it, taxes to be paid on the sale are often the real motivator for the State.

 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Feb 2, 2005
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At our Silver Springs FL home
A park model may or may not be considered a vehicle - check the laws in your state.  If it is classified as a vehicle, it will have a title and you must get it transferred into your name, using whatever procedure the state requires (may or may not include a notary). If you don't, you do not "own" the park model at all!  If not classed as a vehicle, there may be some other category with its own rules for legal transfer.


Some people refer to a "destination RV" as a park model, but they are technically different. Destination RVs are sized for highway travel without special permits, i.e. they are no more than 8'6" wide when set for highway travel. Park models are wider than that and require wide load permits to be moved, so not really a highway vehicle. Some states  allow a semi-permanent but still portable building to be designated  as either a vehicle or real property

If the land it sits on is private (you are buying the land as well as the park model), you should get a deed for the land. If a rental lot, that doesn't apply but make sure the landlord knows he has a new tenant, has your contact info, etc.
 

kdbgoat

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Apr 16, 2014
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6,313
Gary RV_Wizard said:
Some people refer to a "destination RV" as a park model, but they are technically different.

And what makes it worse is when some dealers call destination models park models.
 

Alfa38User

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Oct 4, 2007
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6,676
kdbgoat said:
And what makes it worse is when some dealers call destination models park models.

Yes, heh heh!! And that triggered a very fast revision of the property owners rules where we are. Trailer type park models were no longer allowed but the arrival of two "destination" trailers kicked the change in wording into action quickly despite the possible technical differences. Where we are the only "park models" allowed are really manufactured homes, not trailers at all.
 

sueh

Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2017
Posts
23
Location
Ohio
Thank you for all the advice and comments. I will call our title office and see what they require.

Sue
 
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