CDL

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2006F350

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Dec 6, 2005
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Memphis TN
Hoping someone here can help me make up my mind. I've heard of some states that pull over pickemup trucks pulling trailers just to check (and jail) if the GVW of the truck and the GVW or the trailer combined exceed 26,000 Lbs. In TN, the answer is 'yes' unless one of the 2 happens to be an RV. I've checked a few other states on-line, and I don't see the RV exclusion, but they all reference the DOT requirement. I checked DOT, and everything I read only refers to 'Commercial' and 'Commerce'. Based on that, I know understand TN exclusions of RV. I am diabetic, and looking at the requirements for a medical card, diabetics are specifically excluded, but if it is controlled, they will give a 1 year conditional medical release. I'm starting to be concerned about not leaving TN as my GVW on the truck is 13,000 Lbs, and my 5w it's around 14,500 Lbs, so the total is in the neighborhood of 27,500. Now, I would be a fool to load it up like that as the truck GCWR is only 26,000. Actual weight, I well within the specs (on the scale, both truck and trailer are just over 21,000 Lbs)

The cost of a CDL is not that much more that the regular license, and I don't honestly think that I would have any problems with their road test, so to me that is not a problem, it's the medical requirement that has me somewhat concerned.

Thanx is advance for any help.

Larry
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Most states exclude all private vehicles from CDL requirements and some have specific exemptions for RVs.  And I've never heard of an trailer RVers being ticketed for the combined GVWRs of the two vehicles. And I'm on the staff of another RV web site besides this one, so I hear/see a lot of tales.  The only case I have heard of is a guy who was ticketed for an actual weight which exceeded the GCWR of his rig and apparently it was a major overload, not just a few pounds.

Some states do require a special class of license for motorhomes in excess of 26,000 lbs. Texas and Maryland come immediately to mind.  The special license is essentially a CDL as far as the testing is concerned but without the "Commerical" designation - it does not entitle the holder to haul goods or passengers for hire. Some states may include the medical requirements of a CDL while others do not.

Most important, for a private vehicle driver license reciprocity will apply. That means if you are legally licensed in your home state, then that same license is considered to be valid in all other US states, regardless of the other states own regulations for its drivers. All US states now have a reciprocity policy, law or regulation.
 

2006F350

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Joined
Dec 6, 2005
Posts
393
Location
Memphis TN
Thanx. That is sort of what I thought. Maybe I was trying to 'read' too much into all the regulations over the past couple days. All the states kept refering to the federal regulations, which only apply to commercial. Just to play it safe, I think that I'll carry a copy of TN's CDL Manual and highlight the RV exclusion. Probably don't need to, but extra few ounces wont affect my loading that much. ::)

Larry

 

Ron

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Jan 29, 2005
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Home is where we park it
When coming back from Texas in January we saw a large 5th three axle wheel with a car tied on behind being pulled by what I thought was a F150 (might have been a F250) pulled over by two patrol cars.  It appeared on officer was winding up a measuring tape and another was either getting portable scales out or putting them back.  Have no idea what the outcome was since my driver didn't even slow down.  Reciprocal agreements do not apply to Weight limits, triple towing, or over length.

 

2006F350

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Joined
Dec 6, 2005
Posts
393
Location
Memphis TN
That I can understand. Most states that I've read about that do allow triple tow specify the last vehicle must be a watercraft, but there is still length limits. If it were scales, they were probably checking to see if they had exceeded the CGWR of the truck. If it was a F150, he deserved to be pulled over, even an F250 would be questionable pulling a large 5W and a car.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
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Reciprocal agreements do not apply to Weight limits, triple towing, or over length.

Well, yes and no. Depends on the specific laws in the two states involved. For example, if the state requires a special class of driver license for a triple tow but your home state does not, then you are OK because licensing reciprocity does apply to that requirement.  But if triple towing is flat illegal in the state you are visiting, then the validity of your driving license is irrelevent and you cannot triple tow through that state.  Same thing if the state says boat trailers only. The only thing that reciprocity applies to is driving license requirements - it does not give carte blanche to violate any other vehicle laws.  So you cannot violate weight limts, CGWR/GVWR regulations, trailering speed limits or any other law just because your home state does not have that same law. There is no reciprocity agreement on any of those things - just on licensing itself.
 

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