Chassis Ground Corrosion

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

Mark_K5LXP

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 17, 2018
Posts
1,069
Location
Albuquerque, NM
Most of it is in the preparation, e.g. grinding through paint and corrosion to bare metal. Hardware is next, using toothed washers between the frame and terminals/lugs. The goop used serves mostly as a moisture barrier so corrosion doesn't get a foothold.

Mark B.
Albuquerque, NM
 

John From Detroit

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 12, 2005
Posts
24,798
Location
Davison Michigan
The cause of corrosion is dissimilar metals and moisture.. Weld the wire to the frame is best. The other methods mentioned are all good however.

I had a major corrosion issue on one chassis battery terminal becuse they used the wrong lug.. When I replaced the battery 9 years and multiple cleanings later.. I also replaced the connector and no problems after that.
 

Ex-Calif

Well-known member
Joined
May 15, 2020
Posts
1,458
You can prep the area to bare metal, install the lug and paint over the joint. Corrosion needs oxygen to form. A paint barrier can help.

I don't recommend star washers on electrical connections. You want as much surface area in contact as possible.

A more simple solution is bare metal and assemble the joints with dielectric grease.
 

ChasA

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 21, 2009
Posts
1,958
I would not use dielectric grease in assembling a ground joint. Dielectric means non-conductive, or insulating. For protection of battery connections, I use an anti corrosion spray.
 

Mark_K5LXP

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 17, 2018
Posts
1,069
Location
Albuquerque, NM
"Dielectric, sometimes referred to as tune-up grease, is a viscous non-conductive waterproof substance used to protect electrical connections from corrosion and dirt."

"There is a myth floating around that putting dielectric grease into electrical connections can cause them to fail because the grease gets between the metal. That’s not true.

Although the dielectric grease does insulate the metal and wiring from external invaders, the contacts are tight enough to still maintain a connection, the grease is just displaced."

"Dielectric grease acts as a lubricant, a sealant, an insulator, and a protectant when lightly used on these applications.
  • Battery terminals
  • Spark plug boots
  • Bulb sockets
  • Trailer connectors
  • General electrical connections
  • General plastic or rubber lubrication"
What The Heck is Dielectric Grease?

Mark B.
Albuquerque, NM
 

CharlesinGA

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 6, 2017
Posts
323
Location
50 miles south of Atlanta, GA
You can prep the area to bare metal, install the lug and paint over the joint. Corrosion needs oxygen to form. A paint barrier can help.

I don't recommend star washers on electrical connections. You want as much surface area in contact as possible.

A more simple solution is bare metal and assemble the joints with dielectric grease.
All good info. I have used dielectric grease (specifically DOW 4) for at least 30 years now on battery terminals PRIOR to installing the clamp or cables. Then I coat the whole connection with it. A spray such as Amsoil metal protectant sprayed on after the joint is assembled will also serve to prevent corrosion.

There is also a conductive paste used by the rail road industry that works exceptionally well but I don't recall what it is called.

Star washers are used because they will cut thru the paint and provide some contact on low draw connections. They assume the installer will not take the time to properly remove the paint and prep the surface so the star washer provides enough contact for a ground in many cases.

Charles
 
Top Bottom