Clarification on Weight and License

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proflemoi

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Joined
Sep 2, 2022
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17
Location
Gales Ferry, CT
Hello All,

In doing some reading it seems that on a regular license it is legal to drive a Class A RV with a weight of 24,000 or less. (If I am wrong please let me know) so the question is... if one is flat towing a vehicle that weighs 4,000 pounds... do you need a class B license or does the 24000 pounds only apply to the RV?

Thanks!
 

uchu

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Sep 9, 2019
Posts
999
Location
Ontario, Canada
The answer to your question depends on your home state, where you are licensed and register your coach.

Regarding your towed vehicle, the weight limit applies to the combination of both towing and towed units. For example, here in Ontario, the maximum weight allowed to drive with a regular G2 class licence (total of towing and towed vehicles) is 24,000lbs.
 

DutchmenSport

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Oct 30, 2021
Posts
397
Location
Anderson, Indiana
In Indiana, license plates are tagged as "RV". It doesn't matter, CLASS A diesel pusher to a pop-up. And the only requirement in Indiana to drive anything RV licensed is to have a normal operator drivers license. However, it's the excise tax that gets you on the year, make, model, if it's a towable or a drivable. But the tags are all RV and the license to operate is just the normal operator automobile drivers license.

So, as stated above, it all depends upon the state you are registered in.
 

Utclmjmpr

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Sep 14, 2009
Posts
5,880
Location
Cedar City, UT
In Utah just a regular class "D" license is needed for a M/H any size with a length limit of 65 feet total combination and no weight restriction.. My class "A" with towed comes in at 31K ready to go.. And when legal in my state I am legal in yours also..>>>Dan
 

p38fln

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 23, 2022
Posts
133
Location
Minnesota
Hello All,

In doing some reading it seems that on a regular license it is legal to drive a Class A RV with a weight of 24,000 or less. (If I am wrong please let me know) so the question is... if one is flat towing a vehicle that weighs 4,000 pounds... do you need a class B license or does the 24000 pounds only apply to the RV?

Thanks!
Hi, the coach itself is legal in all us states on a class C or class D license. Some states will require a class B license if you hook something up with a rated GVWR of 2000 pounds or more. Wisconsin would only require one if the rv itself exceeds a certain length, California would always require one iirc, only if you’re hooked to a trailer in your case. Every state is different. Note this is only for private use, for commercial use (you’re getting paid to drive) a class B would always be required.
 
Last edited:

Skookum

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Dec 19, 2018
Posts
1,455
Edit: It appears Recreational Vehicles (for personal use) are exempt from the Class B licensing requirements.

Here's information directly from the State of Connecticut (see list of exemptions):

 
Last edited:

John From Detroit

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Apr 12, 2005
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27,011
Location
Davison Michigan
As others have said your millage varies depending on where you live.
Some states you need to upgrade. Some you need an endorsement
And the weight switch point varies.. So though I can not answer your question.
I can only point out that your state will have a downloadable document likely called "State Vehicle Code" (Replace State with the name of your state) If you can read Legal (not all can) you can likely figure it out .. But be aware.. Not all police officers have read it.
 

NY_Dutch

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Nov 22, 2010
Posts
8,232
Location
Where our wheels take us!
It would appear you need a commercial, "Class B" license in Connecticut to drive an RV that weighs 26,001 lbs or more even though you intend to operate the RV for personal (non-commercial) use.

There are more than a handful of states which actually do require a CDL even for personally owned/operated RV's. Others do not.

Here's information directly from the State of Connecticut:

From the CT DMV website:


Vehicles Exempt from CDL


Below listed are those vehicles that are exempt from the requirements of a Commercial Driver's License:
  • Vehicles used for farming purposes (within 150 miles of the farm ).
  • Fire fighting apparatus.
  • Authorized emergency vehicles.
  • Recreational vehicles. (emphasis added)
  • Military vehicles operated by military personnel.
 

Skookum

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Joined
Dec 19, 2018
Posts
1,455
From the CT DMV website:


Vehicles Exempt from CDL


Below listed are those vehicles that are exempt from the requirements of a Commercial Driver's License:
  • Vehicles used for farming purposes (within 150 miles of the farm ).
  • Fire fighting apparatus.
  • Authorized emergency vehicles.
  • Recreational vehicles. (emphasis added)
  • Military vehicles operated by military personnel.

D'OH!!! I totally missed that, and I even looked at the exemptions, and it didn't pop out at me!
 

Lou Schneider

Site Team
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
12,118
Drivers licenses are recognized by other states, if you're legally licensed to drive your rig in your home state you're good to go in other states even if they have different requirements.
 

p38fln

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Joined
Sep 23, 2022
Posts
133
Location
Minnesota
The driver must also operate the vehicle according to the regulation of the state you are in, e.g. speed limits, length restrictions, etc.
Yes I've heard horror stories of people that take an RV combination of the interstate in California and run smack into the overall weight limit. They do not screw around. If they catch you over 65 feet long, you'll get a ticket and will not be allowed to move from the spot until the problem is corrected. This means you'll need to unhook enough stuff to get under 65 feet and either drive the other vehicle separately or make multiple trips to get back to the STAA approved routes in California. We had this happen with a semi truck, returning to the interstate was not an option. Had to hire a stubby cabover daycab to get the overall length under 65 feet and follow it back to the highway with the over the road tractor. They do apply this law to rvs as well.
 

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