Class A vs C...and other questions by some newbs

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flyhop

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We are 42 years old, homeschool our 2 daughters (12 & 6) and live in the Southeast.? In six months, we should embark on a 100-day tour of the U.S., mostly west of the Mississippi and primarily to see the National Parks and various points of interest.? Having car- and sailboat-camped rather extensively in our previous journeys, we are rather used to living reasonably peacefully in small quarters since it allows us to travel and explore.? Toward that end and with ambitious plans, an RV-based excursion is a natural extension of our previous adventures.

We have read many of the Library postings here, and have some questions for which we hope to find answers here.? So, come one, come all.? Opinions and ideas are welcomed and appreciated.? If you feel that our musings and puzzlins would be better suited to another site/forum, make that suggestion as well.

1.? Class A vs. Class C.? It would seem that our prime consideration is "landing the beast".? That is, being that we're dragging our home wherever we go, we want to be sure that we can get where we want to go.? Aside from wide turning allowances and backing an RV up, do Class A and/or Class C RVs have difficulty getting into some areas of National Parks while SUVs and cars do not (i.e. Road to the Sun, etc.)?

2.? MPG.? Our finances dictate that we consider a used RV (very used).? Given the wild fluctuations of oil prices and the regional range of gas prices now, let alone in 6 months, our immediate budgetary concern is a reasonable expectation for MPG.? In a well-tuned and lubricated RV, what is a reasonable MPG assumption of comparably loaded 28' Class A vs 28' Class C?

3.? Dogs.? We know that some parks do not allow animals.? While my wife thinks we are comfortable with the destinational disappointments and inconveniences this may bring, we are looking to hear from others on what other problems or issues they have encountered.? Maybe something we aren't expecting?? Frankly, I think I should have my head examined at the very thought of taking a couple of 50 pound dogs on a 10,000 mile, 100 day trek, only to spend hours-on-end couped up on 300 square feet of carpet.? Hearing an appropriate solution to the problem would be most beneficial.?

4.? Destination information.? While we are not adverse to taking the kids to a water park now and again, they are practically dime-a-dozen and readily found in most all books/brochures we have.? We have perused most all of the books at the local big-box book store only to find that the points of interest we are seeking are mixed in with the thousands of other things, thus creating a veritable needle in a haystack.? Is there a single source/site/forum of information on museums and historical sights?? (Big question, but she made me...)

5.? Right price and what to look for.? I have had one too many incidents of taking a potential car/boat purchase to a local mechanic and have them tell me that it's in pretty good shape and needs a couple of things, only to bring it back to them to repair those couple of things and find out it's barely salvageable and is now a couple hundred things.? Please direct us to the post or site that spells out the specific things to look at in an RV so we can be reasonably sure that it's sound (i.e. when to know if there's been water damage that is repairable vs when to walk/run away; what should I look for on the roof; rust in the undercarriage; what's a ding and what's major damage, etc.).

6.? Satisfy my curiosity.? Why does the picture on eBay (great source to see the different layouts) of a 29' Class A look so much bigger than a 29' Class C?? Aren't they roughly the same length and width??

To all dispensers of wit and wisdom who choose to respond to any and all of these questions, thank you in advance.
 

Shayne

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Just remember a Class A is on a truck chassis and a C on a light weight Van chassis.  Also  I do know of a few dealers that are no longer stocking C's  Reason  is the price is getting very close to the news smaller As  and there isn't really an advantage in their and my opinion in having a C.  In most cases  NO Genset, No Jacks and little more cramped.  When you ad the other things in  A's are simularly prices.  But you have to do what is best for you.  Mileage is possibly a little better on a C which is in the 6 to 10 mph.  A's 5 to 9.  not much difference but a lot more comfort in A's  especially with the kids.  You can run a genset while on the road and they can play their computer games and TV games on the move.  Sure makes it easier to travel whn they are active \ and not bored.  Just a thought and my Opinion only.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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1.  Class A vs. Class C.  It would seem that our prime consideration is "landing the beast".  That is, being that we're dragging our home wherever we go, we want to be sure that we can get where we want to go.  Aside from wide turning allowances and backing an RV up, do Class A and/or Class C RVs have difficulty getting into some areas of National Parks while SUVs and cars do not (i.e. Road to the Sun, etc.)?

It's a matter of size, not type.  An SUV or car gets to a max of about 18 feet, whereas a motorhome could be anywhere from 18-45 feet.  So choose your length based on the places you want to drive it.  As for sightseeing, e.g. Going to the Sun, you aren't driving the RV there in either case. You take the pasenger vehicle, whether it is the one that towed the trailer or the one you towed behind the motorhome.

There are some Forest Service back-country campsites hat are difficult for any vehicle over 20-24 feet. National Parks and such usually handle vehicles at least up to around 35 feet. Most private campgrounds can accomodate a 40 footer somewhere, if not on every site.

In a well-tuned and lubricated RV, what is a reasonable MPG assumption of comparably loaded 28' Class A vs 28' Class C?

How heavy is your foot?  Speed and driving style can make a big difference.    That size probably weighs in around 12-14,000 lbs.  If gas powered, we are probably talking the 8-10 mpg range. If diesel, probably 11-13 mpg. Heck, my 35 foot Class A gasser weighs 21,000+ (not counting the car we tow) and gets 7-8 mpg.  Yes, fuel is a major expense, but the relative size of the rig is not a huge factor in fuel consumption.

3.  Dogs.  We know that some parks do not allow animals.  While my wife thinks we are comfortable with the destinational disappointments and inconveniences this may bring, we are looking to hear from others on what other problems or issues they have encountered.  Maybe something we aren't expecting?  Frankly, I think I should have my head examined at the very thought of taking a couple of 50 pound dogs on a 10,000 mile, 100 day trek, only to spend hours-on-end couped up on 300 square feet of carpet.  Hearing an appropriate solution to the problem would be most beneficial.

Some parks will restrict dogs above a certain weight (it's just an objective way to specify size), sometimes 30 lbs, sometimes 40-50. Most simply require a leash at all times.  Many people travel with dogs and I think they are all crazy to restrict themselves so badly to cater to the dogs needs, but what do I know? We have a cat... ;)

Please direct us to the post or site that spells out the specific things to look at in an RV so we can be reasonably sure that it's sound (i.e. when to know if there's been water damage that is repairable vs when to walk/run away; what should I look for on the roof; rust in the undercarriage; what's a ding and what's major damage, etc.).

You are looking for a guarantee that doesn't exist.  I too have little faith in the average technician's "check out" of  a vehicle I intend to buy and don't bother with it. Others swear these pre-sale checks are absolutely necessary.  Fact is, you can't tell much about the condition of an engine, transmission, or major appliance without tearing it down for an internal exam, and that's too expensive to be worthwhile in most cases.

What to look for? Bubbles, cracks, things that make odd grinding noises when they move, water stains, etc. Each indicates something that bears closer atention. Mayor may not indicate a serious problem, so ask here if you see any such indication.

 

scottydl

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Hey flyhop, welcome to the hunt.  ;)  I'm only a few months ahead of you in my MH search, haven't bought anything yet.  Check out this recent thread that covers just about every aspect of Class A's vs. Class C's.

FWIW, when I started my looking/shopping about 5-6 months ago I was in the Class C market 100%.  That's all I looked at online and in person, that's all I considered in my mind.  I had/have emotional attachments to that body style from fun childhood experiences camping with my grandparents, and always thought that overhead bunk was just plain cool.  But I've been almost convinced to go with a Class A now, for the extra space and comfort reasons... I'm still looking at C's but am probably 80/20 in favor of buying an A at this point.  Although the deciding factor in my purchase will be value, condition, and features (in that order), a bill that could be met by either style.


flyhop said:
6.  Satisfy my curiosity.  Why does the picture on eBay (great source to see the different layouts) of a 29' Class A look so much bigger than a 29' Class C?  Aren't they roughly the same length and width?

Having viewed literally hundreds of MH's on eBay during recent months, I know *exactly* what you're talking about!  I believe the reason is this; both rigs are measured from nose to tail.  With a Class C, that includes 6-7 feet of the van hood and cab that you see before you get to the actual attached motorhome body.  Whereas a Class A's motorhome body pretty much starts with its nose, since that's all it is!  Maybe a simplistic answer, but I believe that's mostly what causes the visual length confusion.  ;)  Secondarily, some people just don't know the actual length of their MH's for sale.  I've seen 24-footers advertised as 29-footers and vice versa, so just double-check with the seller if you want to be sure.

[edit]Fixed link.[/edit]
 

chaajoad

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Flyhop - Interesting name, btw ...

First, you made a great decision by coming to this board. In July I bought our first MH, a 1999 Fleetwood Bounder 34J, and it came with no manuals and I knew next to nothing about what I was doing. I spent months searching the net, want-ads, RV shows and dealers. I decided to concentrate on what I wanted rather than actual price. Of course there was a price range but when I've made large purchases - like a car, house, motorcycle, even a winter coat - I've always stretched to get the best I could. When I go as cheap as I can, I always regret it. It's like someone shopping for a $200,000 house and the agent wants to show you the perfect house for you but it's $240,000. Almost always it's not for the few bucks extra commission (I used to have a RE license) it's because the house/car/coat is the best for your needs.

Keeping that in mind, I narrowed it down to Bounders. I liked the look and although they are entry level with few glamorous bells and whistles, it would be perfect for our needs. Before I came to this conclusion, I came real close to making what would have been a disasterous purchase of a 28' foot trailer that, on a good day and a flat pull, my Explorer MIGHT have safely towed. But i got carried away at an RV show - luckily, I got out of it.

After the Bounder decision, it was time to focus in. Over the years I've had very good luck on ebay so I spent much of my time on-line. Ebay also has a $20,000 fraud warranty on most vehicles so that helps - if you're lied to or the vehicle is substantially misrepresented, you do have a course of action. And no, I don't have a connection with ebay.

I finally found the Bounder I liked and entered into the bidding. I did it all on faith. I didn't even have the cash in hand - I was refinancing our house to get the $$ and was assured the money was there. And I trusted the guy selling it. We swapped a few emails, talked a few times briefly - it was good vibes. Finally the auction was over and his reserve wasn't meant. I shot him an email with a final figure to ask if that would do it and he said "sold." It was almost the penny the amount of money I was getting out of the re-fi.

A few days later I got on a train from Seattle to Portland and he met me. On the train, I found out the cash transfer hadn't happened. I was nervous but he was cool, dropped me off at a motel. No change of clothes, nothing. Thank God for living in America. I walked across the street and in a few minutes I had clean socks and underwear, a toothbrush, a nice take-out meal and some cold beer. The next morning the seller arrived with the MH. The money had transferred so I owned it. He gave me a 5 minute walk-through, wished me luck and left. I sat there in a 35 foot RV, 200+ miles from home thinking I had just done the dumbest thing in the history of mankind.

But I'm a believer in moving forward, so ... I put in "drive" and headed off. It was almost a surreal experience, going through heavy traffic in basically a bus. But it was also cool.

When I pulled into the driveway, my wife started laughing hysterically and my 9 year son was about a foot off the ground. That reaction alone might have been worth it.

I started nosing around, trying to figure out what does what. This board has been an immense help. Eventually, I got 95% of everything figured out so we took off on our first trip a few backs with #2 this weekend.

My thinking is similar to RV Roamer's - you can inspect and investigate six ways to Sunday and still get a lemon. Or you can you buy one sight unseen (like me) and maybe get a good deal. There's a tiny part of me waiting for the tranny to fall out on the road but I think that's pretty common. If you read through these posts you'll find plenty of buyers with rigs running $100,000, $200,000 and more with lots of complaints. And you'll find folks with a 25 yr old RV they picked up for a song that has served them well. There's no escaping the fact that they will cost money after you buy it. Mine needs about $2,000 worth of new tires.

My advice is get an A. I looked at C's and just couldn't be convinced. I'm not knocking C owners and I'm a real newbie but they seems kind of like a bog on a frame where a C feels more like a bus - and I like bus travel. Listen to roamer - check for suspicious noises, bulges, water stains, handling problems. I think you can do this yourself. If you drive every rig you consider to a mechanic I not only think you'll go a bit daft but it will add up ($$$) quickly. Take a friend who has experience. Take your wife - she needs to feel comfortable with the process and in the MH itself. Try everything - water, oven, fridge, lights, AC. heat. Take a digital camera so if you're looking at multiple rigs you can have a frame of reference. And be prepared to maybe be disappointed - while you're deciding, someone else might show up with cash and your search begins anew. As for the dogs - I wouldn't think it's fair to 100 lbs of dog to keep them cooped up, but ... I sure do understand loving our mutts.

I'm taking courses to get a college degree (I'm in my 50's) and don't really need one for my job. So why do it? Many years ago I heard a talk show host being asked an investment question by a reluctant caller. The host said "If you do this investment, in five years how old will you be?" The caller said "Forty-five." The host replied, "if you DON'T do the investment
how old will you be in five years?" The point is - time flies by. We hem and haw and think and hesitate - meanwhile, life whizzes past us. Regardless of whenever you buy, whatever you buy and how much you spend, tomorrow will be here in a heart beat. Do a little research, some basic thinking and plunge ahead. There could be rough waters, there could be a ton of adventure.

To put it in perspective, on our first trip my wife really had to use the facilities. She returned to her navigator's seat and I asked her, "well, was that worth $25,000?"  She never hesitated.

"Yup."
 

Carl L

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Being trailer trash not a motorhomer myself, I can take a swing at only a couple of your questions.

3.? Dogs.? We know that some parks do not allow animals.? While my wife thinks we are comfortable with the destinational disappointments and inconveniences this may bring, we are looking to hear from others on what other problems or issues they have encountered.? Maybe something we aren't expecting?? Frankly, I think I should have my head examined at the very thought of taking a couple of 50 pound dogs on a 10,000 mile, 100 day trek, only to spend hours-on-end couped up on 300 square feet of carpet.? Hearing an appropriate solution to the problem would be most beneficial

Dogs can adapt well to RV life.? They will demand a lot of walks to take care of business if nothing else.? I no of no dog who would object to that.? ?If the family has lived in an RV for a while the dogs will regard it as their home full of the things and scents of the human members of their pack.

4.? Destination information.? While we are not adverse to taking the kids to a water park now and again, they are practically dime-a-dozen and readily found in most all books/brochures we have.? We have perused most all of the books at the local big-box book store only to find that the points of interest we are seeking are mixed in with the thousands of other things, thus creating a veritable needle in a haystack.? Is there a single source/site/forum of information on museums and historical sights?? (Big question, but she made me...)

The best books I have seen for the purpose are the AAA Tour Books.? ?About half their content is what you are talking about.? The Smithsonian Guide to Historic America series is excellent and is available thru online stores like Amazon.
 

Wendy

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1. Class A vs. Class C. Where you can go with your RV isn't dependent on A vs. C....it's a matter of length. Many Forest Service campgrounds won't handle a length over 30-feet. Same holds true for many National Park Service campgrounds. If you want to stay in the parks, look smaller, not larger, or plan on staying in private campgrounds outside the parks and visiting them in your towed.

2. MPG. We got 6-8 MPG in our 24-foot Class C. We get 8-10 in our 28-foot Class A.

3. Dogs. As long as you're there, and they know it's their home (toys, food, treats), most dogs adapt very well to the RV lifestyle. We have a 90-pound lab who thinks theres nothing better than jumping in the motorhome and heading out. Just don't forget that you have to walk them when they need out, you can't just open the door and let them go (well, unless you're boondocking somewhere and there's no one else around).

4. Destination information. Ditto the AAA suggestion. Love those TourBooks and Campbooks and it's the reason we keep our membership. The Internet is also a great place for travel info. If you're looking to visit National Parks, you can look up any NPS site online by typing www.nps.gov/ and then, after the slash, typing the first 2 letters of the first 2 words of the park's name (ex: Death Valley is DEVA, Grand Canyon is GRCA). There are a couple of exceptions (Carlsbad Caverns is CAVE....superintendent didn't like CACA) but most hold to the 2/2 rule. Local libraries are great places to get information. And always stop at the visitor centers at state borders and in cities, towns, and villages, especially small towns....many have free give aways (coupons, snacks, razors, maps, brochures).

5. Right price and what to look for. Look, look, look, try them out, visit dealers and RV shows. Price is dependent on what you can afford and feel comfortable with.

6. Why does the picture on eBay (great source to see the different layouts) of a 29' Class A look so much bigger than a 29' Class C?  Aren't they roughly the same length and width?  Yes and No. Because the front of the Class A (driver area) is so much more open than the cockpit of a Class C, it seems and is much bigger. And slideouts add an enormous amount of space.

Keep asking questions. And keep shopping. And above all else, enjoy.
 

Karl

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39' class A (gas) - 6-8 mpg.

Also, your estimate of floor space in a 28-footer is a little off. Even if you don't count the lost floor area because of sink islands, refrigerators, vanity, chairs, dinettes, driving space, etc., you're still looking at a maximum width of 102" X 28', or 238 sq. ft.; not 300. Add to that if you have a slide. I have a cat that can (and does) go anywhere; a 50lb. dog might be somewhat different :D

Consider also that with a class C, you drive in the cab and then transfer to the living area when you've reached your destination. In a class A, you move back and forth without having to go outside.
 

Wendy

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Karl said:
Consider also that with a class C, you drive in the cab and then transfer to the living area when you've reached your destination. In a class A, you move back and forth without having to go outside.

Huh? I don't remember having to "go outside" to get from the driving area to the living area in our Class C?? Of course, you could if you wanted to.
 

Ned

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We did rent a Tioga on a Chevy chassis were you had to practically climb over the doghouse to get out of the cab, but in general, no, you don't have to go outside in a Class C to get from front to back.
 

Saboteur

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Be careful around here, misinformation abounds!!

Class C's generally are smaller than class A's, a benefit in camping in National Parks and Forests where the average campsite is limited to RVs of about 27'.? Class C's do in fact have gensets and leveling jacks, although the jacks are not always needed if you've got a small coach.? There are class C's that range up to 45' and some sleep 8 with no problems.? Most of the folks around this forum drive Class A's so it is not a good place for objective information with respect to Class C RVs.

Dogs are NOT welcome in the National Parks and some have restrictions on leaving them unattended in campgrounds or vehicles.?

You do not have to exit a class C to get to the house, most ridiculous statement I've ever read.

I strongly suggest you try another RV forum where you are more likely to get objective info on Class C's

RV Net

Hayduke
 

Ned

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While many of us do drive, and live in, class A motorhomes, many of us have owned class C motorhomes, trailers, and even vans in the past and can certainly answer questions related to those.  The collective experience and knowledge of the nearly 7000 members here covers the entire RV experience.

As for misinformation, the infrequent misstatement will be quickly corrected by one or more of the members here.  I have been at many other RV related venues on the internet and all of them suffer from some level of misinformation and discord, much more so than here, in my opinion.  I have to question your motives in making such inflammatory statements.
 

Shayne

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Ned  I'm in total agreement with you.  Don't understand how a statement of that nature could ever be made on this forum.  It's so diversified it isn't funny.    Sure some of us prefer A's  but we've all been down the line and it's definitely an individuals choice.  Some people are just out of their league when it comes to understanding what they read, if they can read. That was totally an asinine statement about the forum people.  Why doe he, she or it even bother to enter if that's what is believed by the individual.
 

cuts_up

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Ned, Saboteur's reply is actually quite mild compared to some of the posts I read on rv.net.  I think rvforum is a much friendlier community. 
 

Carl L

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Saboteur said:
Be careful around here, misinformation abounds!!

Class C's generally are smaller than class A's, a benefit in camping in National Parks and Forests where the average campsite is limited to RVs of about 27'.? Class C's do in fact have gensets and leveling jacks, although the jacks are not always needed if you've got a small coach.? There are class C's that range up to 45' and some sleep 8 with no problems.? Most of the folks around this forum drive Class A's so it is not a good place for objective information with respect to Class C RVs.

Oh, I don't know about that.? I tow a 23' TT myself.? Check our action in the relevant topic sections.? Yes there are a lot of motorhomers here, but there are a lot of trailer, van, and tent trailer folks too.? Hey this is not a issue to chose up sides on.? ?We all have a lot of overlap in our interests.?


Dogs are NOT welcome in the National Parks and some have restrictions on leaving them unattended in campgrounds or vehicles.?
Not so.? ?Every national park has its regulations regarding pets.? ?Here are those for Yosemite National Park as copied from its NPS website.

Pets

If you choose to bring your pet to Yosemite, please abide by these regulations:

Pets are only allowed
in developed areas
on roads
on fully paved trails and roads
in campgrounds (except Tamarack Flat, Porcupine Flat, and walk-in campgrounds)

Pets are not allowed
on unpaved or poorly paved trails
in wilderness areas
on shuttle buses
in concessioner lodging areas
in Tamarack Flat, Porcupine Flat, and all walk-in campgrounds
in any group or horse camps

Pets must be restrained on a leash not more than six feet long or otherwise physically restrained
Leashed pets may not be left unattended
For the courtesy of other visitors, human companions are responsible for cleaning up and depositing pet feces in trash receptacles

A few places where pets are allowed, contrary to the general prohibition regarding pets on unpaved roads: the Meadow Loop and Four Mile fire roads in Wawona, on the Carlon Road, and on the Old Big Oak Flat Road between Hodgdon Meadow and Hazel Green Creek.


In short, one of the most restrictive and overcrowded national parks has regulations no more restrictive tnan any well run commercial trailer park.? Your statement is just plain not true.? ?A person should always check the park regulations before bringing pets, National Park or commercial trailer park.

 

scottydl

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wendycoke said:
Huh? I don't remember having to "go outside" to get from the driving area to the living area in our Class C?? Of course, you could if you wanted to.

Ditto, my workplace has a 1989 27' Class C and there is plenty of room to move between the seats back to the living area.  And FWIW, I have also seen several Class C's for sale that have rotating driver & passenger seats... a more common feature on Class A's that allows those seats to become part of the living room.
 

Tom

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scottydl said:
I have also seen several Class C's for sale that have rotating driver & passenger seats...

Thanks for that input Scott. I haven't seen any myself, so I guess I'm overdue for a visit to the RV shows.
 

Wendy

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We have a Class A, also a VW Vanagon. Before the A, we had a Class C and before that assorted 5th wheels and trailers (and always with a VW camper van in the mix). There's a lot of folks on the forum with that same type of experience. Lots of Class As here but lots of everything else, too.

As for dogs in NPS sites, I'm married to a retired National Park Service ranger and have lived in many national parks. Dogs are welcome in almost all of them, subject to certain rules. Virtually all parks allow dogs in cars, in RVs, in campgrounds and along the roads. Many allow dogs on some of their trails. Can you leave the beasties alone in your RV all day while you're gone....NO. Can you leave the beasties alone in your RV at a private campground.....NO. Can you let them run loose in the parks.....NO. But you can't let them run loose in most places. And that's in the dogs' best interests. And I know of no federal site that restricts the size of dogs as many private campgrounds do.

 

Carl L

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Can you leave the beasties alone in your RV all day while you're gone....NO

Beg to differ.? Note the rules for Yosemite.? Dogs cannot be left alone ouitside on a leash.? That is generally true of any campground, or city for that matter.? ? Inside an RV is another matter.? As long as your critter is not a compulsive lonely barker, most CGs and parks I have encountered do not care.
 
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