Class A's to avoid??

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rockypablo

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Mar 14, 2017
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Are there any Class A RV makes and models to avoid.  I am looking for a quality, not cheap, 2000-2010 used Class A...Any opinions welcome.
 

Larry N.

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Westminster, Colorado
Condition and floor plan (one you like) are more important than manufacturer. All else being equal (which it rarely is), higher end coaches (basically those costing more when new) will have more amenities and will usually have better materials in the construction (real wood vs press board, etc.). Find one you think meets your needs well and have it inspected before purchase, but don't just look at one or two -- attend several RV shows, if possible, and/or visit several dealers to look over a variety of coaches in order to start getting a feel for what you are looking at/for.
 
S

sightseers

Guest
I did the same thing.  I wanted well built and affordable.   

(IMO)  The number one thing it takes for it to be a good RV,    is a good roof,  most all have a adequate engine and chassis to do the job.

so I looked for ones with a solid roof.  Solid fiberglass is the roof most higher end ones have,  but a couple cheaper ones have solid aluminum or fiberglass.

Most cheap motorhomes have TPO or rubber roofs.  and visible interior water damage is common to see followed by "it's been re-sealed"

look at Rexhall or Safari,  some of the off brand private builders.

good luck
 

RedandSilver

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Aug 25, 2016
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I agree that if you look at higher end coaches you will get more for your money and a better quality coach most of the time.
That said - condition is one of the (if not the most) important things to look at.  Of course the floorplan is important too.

My Rexhall RoseAir was the top of the line in that make so it had upgraded features which have stood the test of time pretty well.
The condition was very good - but even so I have had a few things to take care of, nothing too major but most older MH's will require
some work here and there.  If your handy it shouldn't be a problem for you. 

So to answer your question "Class A's to avoid??" - any that are in fair condition or even one's with only 6000 miles on it and 16 years old
might not be a good value.  In most cases it's better to use a MH than let it sit unused for very long periods of time.

You didn't mention gas or diesel - but IMO that is why buying an older top of the line MH at a really reduced cost allowed me
to go with a diesel which is something I know I wanted - yet knew it would have to be 10 or more years old for me to afford.

Good luck in finding one - there out there but it takes awhile to know a good one from a bad one so if you've just started looking
take your time, and IMO don't go too small as that seems to be a mistake many first time class A owners make and then end up
upgrading - sometimes more than once.

 

Deano2002

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Apr 21, 2013
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911
Location
Morris, IL.
rv shows are only going to make you want a new one and, you are not looking for a new one. I have seen most manufacturers have the same as each other but, might move them around some, in their perspective price ranges. Personally I like the Travel Supreme, Country Coach, Newmar, Monaco in the years you are looking for.
 

ZinLuvR

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Jan 23, 2018
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129
Location
Colville, WA
Consider the availability of replacement parts.  If there is something broke, cracked or worn, don't assume that fixing or replacing will come easy.  I dropped a glass lens cover changing a light bulb.  Needless to say, the covers are no longer made.  Two choices, hunt down a replacement if I can find one, or replace the whole light fixture which then won't match the rest of the lights.  I can tell you right now, my DW the co-pilot is not going to let me put a mismatch in our coach.  So, replace all the light fixtures in the coach's ceiling, about 24 of them, or go to the end of the earth to find a match.
 

Bobtop46

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Mar 11, 2011
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781
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Bronson FL
I wouldn't say to avoid them but check into the company of the MH you intend to buy.  Coachman (I have one) was bought out, and continues on today.  The problem is the new company has zero support for the previous companies product.  Nothing.  I have to go thru each systems supplier for info or replacement parts.  It is a workhorse 22 chassis and there is plenty of sources for parts and info online for it.  Mostly I would like a wiring diagram.  Not to be. 
 

SeilerBird

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St Cloud Florida USA
Personally I would not worry about whether or not the manufacturer was still in business. I would think that about 99% of all parts needed for an RV would not have been made by the manufacturer.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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My view is sometimes considered snobbish, but that is not what drives it. The RV business is extremely price-competitive, so if you see two coaches that appear superficially the same (amenities, size, etc) and the MSRP price differs, even 1%, you can be assured that there is a difference in the construction and quality of materials.  Probably under the covers, so you need a good eye for detail and careful attention to specs to identify the differences. Maybe it will be something you don't care much about, but you need to figure it out.  If there is 5% or so difference, there is probably a lot of difference.    Note I said MSRP,  since used prices can vary widely.  The NADA RV Guide will give MSRP prices for each model, so you can use that to gauge the price class the coach was in when it was made.

Some things that lower-priced models often skimp on are:  chassis capacity and length, engine size, transmission model, quality of wiring and plumbing, cabinetry construction (type of wood and finish, hardware, etc),  flooring and upholstery materials, and sizes of tanks, batteries, etc.


The rest of the choice of a used rig is its present condition. A poorly maintained RV is probably crap even if it was great when new.  However, if you are buying a "handyman special" to fix up yourself, buy the the one that was originally better built.

Don't worry about whether the manufacturer is still in business - it's largely irrelevant anyway.  The newest rig you are considering is already 8 years old and the manufacturer has long since ceased even the minimal support they gave when new.  Most of the chassis components, applainces, and plumbing/electrical stuff will have come from 3rd parties and will still be available or at least replaceable with new stuff.
 

Bobtop46

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Bronson FL
SeilerBird said:
Personally I would not worry about whether or not the manufacturer was still in business. I would think that about 99% of all parts needed for an RV would not have been made by the manufacturer.

I agree with this, and pretty much said the same.  I have a 2007/8 Coachman Aurora.  I would like a wiring diagram for the coax cable run in the coach.  Where do I get this? Call the manufacture.  I did NOT supported, that was old Coachman not the new Coachman.  That goes for any wiring diagram for the MH.  I would like to replace the headlights.  I will have to pull the part off the coach to find a number on the headlight and chase that part down, because I can't call Coachman and ask them in that year/model coach what vehicles headlight did they use.  Zero support.  On this forum often the answer is give "manufacturer" a call and ask them.

My point was that is not always an option depending on the year of the coach and manufacturer.  Something to keep in mind when looking for a used rig and manufacturers like the OP asked, the whole reason for this thread.
 

zmotorsports

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Dec 10, 2010
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Utah
SeilerBird said:
Personally I would not worry about whether or not the manufacturer was still in business. I would think that about 99% of all parts needed for an RV would not have been made by the manufacturer.

Same here.  My first two coaches were orphans and I never had any issues sourcing parts.  Hell even my current coach is more or less an orphan and parts can be sourced from various suppliers.  I think a common concern is that someone can't just go down to the dealership or call the manufacturer and have the part sitting on their doorstep a few days later.  Having an orphan merely means you have to be a little more resourceful than going directly to the manufacturer.

Mike
 
S

sightseers

Guest
I'll bet the number of orphan RV's for sale, far exceeds the number of used RV's made by currently operating companies.
So many manufactures closed their doors about 10 years ago when things hit bottom. 

Orphan replacement parts are actually easy to get online.  otherwise Winnebago is said to be the gold standard of replacement part support companies.

 

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