diesel fuel

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Ron

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richsaenz said:
Does anyone have an opinion on using premium diesel vs #2? How about biodiesel?

At most locations you find only #2 diesel available.  The only benefit of # 1 diesel is it doesn't gel in cold weather.  However, as the seasons change additives to control gelling are added.  The only thing one needs to be concerned about is if they have a full tank of fuel bought in warm climate or season and then will be traveling in cold weather.  In this case it is recommended to add anti gelling additive to the fuel in your tank.


I have never used anything but #2 diesel in our coach.
 

Tom

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I haven't seen "premium diesel", but maybe someone will correct me. Here in the west we see only diesel #2. I believe diesel #1 is used only in very cold climates.

Biodiesel (or biocide) prevents the growth of bacteria in diesel fuel. Folks normally use it only when their RV will sit in storage for long periods of time. If you're driving it every day and frequently replacing the fuel in the tank, biodiesel should not be requires.

Did I misunderstand the question?
 

Ron

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caltex said:
Tom, I think the referral to biodiesel was to the diesel fuel made from vegtable oil.

Yes Biodiesel is made from vegetable oil sometimes even used vegetable oil.  For some interesting reading google "Biodiesel"
 

Tom

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OK thanks, I misunderstood the biodiesel.
 

blueblood

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Tom said:
I haven't seen "premium diesel", but maybe someone will correct me. Here in the west we see only diesel #2. I believe diesel #1 is used only in very cold climates.

Biodiesel (or biocide) prevents the growth of bacteria in diesel fuel. Folks normally use it only when their RV will sit in storage for long periods of time. If you're driving it every day and frequently replacing the fuel in the tank, biodiesel should not be requires.

Did I misunderstand the question?

Premium diesel is sold by a very limited number of company/stations. I don't see any need for anything other than #2 since that's the std the engine was developed . Biodiesel at 5 percent is the Cummins recommended mix at this time pending development of stds. by SAE et l.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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The "premium" designation has nothing to do with  grading of diesel fuel as #2 or #1 diesel, which basically describes the viscosity of the petroleum.  There is no specific standard for what constitutes "premium" in diesel. Instead, as of 2003, any fuel that meets minimum characteristics in at least these 4 categories can be labeled "premium".  Categories  include lubricity, cetane rating, low temperature operability and thermal stability. As of the 2003 draft standard, it does NOT include energy content, i.e. premium diesel does not imply more power, nor anything about Injector Cleaning (these had been factors prior to 2003).

The National Conference on Weights and Measures is the primary US standards authority because they essentioally control the labeling used at fuel pumps, but the DOE, the  Petroleum Council,  and others have their oar in the [muddy] water too. CARB has also regulated the use of the word "premium" in CA.  Furthermore, forthcoming regulations for low sulphur diesel and other EPA regulations transcend any definition of "premium".

As of this time, it appears to me that there is little benefit to using a "premium" diesel if most of your operation is in "normal" operating conditions, primarily RPM and temperature ranges. Of course, the price difference has to be factored into the purchase decision, but even an extra 2-3 cents/gallon seems questionable to me. The engines are designed to run well on standard diesel fuel and in the absence of extreme operating conditions whatever additional qualities a premium diesel may have are probably unnecessary and a waste of $.

Here is what I found on the "premium" factors:

...any fuel marketer claiming to sell "premium diesel" in the U.S. must have a fuel with:

# at least 47 cetane number by American Society for Testing & Materials (ASTM) D613 method;

# 80% reflectance on ASTM D6468 test for thermal stability, and;

# low-temperature operability (within the 10th percentile of minimum recorded temperature for maps & charts area per ASTM D975 diesel fuel standard, using either low-temperature flow test (LTFT -- ASTM D4539) or cloud point (ASTM D2500).

# improved lubricity (I couldn't find the approved draft version of the lubricity spec)
 

dsl4us

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There is a station in our area that sells premium Diesel. It is labeled with a cetane of 50 and has Lubrizol added to it.
 
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