Doberman in the RV?

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Your argument is fair, but if you randomly surveyed in a campground somewhere I bet you’d find a lot of people fear the doberman breed and the why part would be interesting….


Yes, but do the cats growl at them?
I started my comment with "IMHO" which means that it is based upon my experience and opinions. I do not pretend to be "all knowing" but rather was throwing my opinion, based upon my knowledge, into the conversation.

I have no personal knowledge of your cats. That said, I would suspect that my experience of unruly kids riding their bikes through campsites (occupied or empty) while yelling at each other would upset most pets. I know it certainly pissed me off.

With respect to breed, I posted a follow-up comment discussing the reasoning of breed choice by dog owners. This comment was based upon conversations with the 3rd generation of owners of a pet boarding/grooming facility.

The question is basically "chicken and the egg". Are dobermans naturally aggressive, or are some people who purchase dobermans more likely to get a thrill over owning a breed with a reputation of being the neighborhood tough guy?

I completely respect your propensity to protect your pets. My issue is that problem dogs are not a dog problem but rather a dog owner problem.
 
Imagine trying to take a cat for a walk. Loose dogs and dogs on longer leashes have become a real problem for us getting our kitties out and about.
My 16lb Maine Coon mix cat would eat a dog. If we didn't keep her on a leash, she would go after any dog that barked or growled at her. She liked walking around the campgrounds in the mornings. But she loved our dog.
 
My 16lb Maine Coon mix cat would eat a dog. If we didn't keep her on a leash, she would go after any dog that barked or growled at her. She liked walking around the campgrounds in the mornings. But she loved our dog.
I have 2 Maine Coons - mix. Both around 20 lbs. Mine were dumped - feral -gentled by me. They enjoy self protection and protecting the younger cats. 1 travels with us, the other guards the homestead when we’re gone. They don’t scrap unless they have to. Both would shred a dog, but only if it was threatening the younger cats. We don’t encourage that or let that happen in a campground.
 
I started my comment with "IMHO" which means that it is based upon my experience and opinions. I do not pretend to be "all knowing" but rather was throwing my opinion, based upon my knowledge, into the conversation.

I have no personal knowledge of your cats. That said, I would suspect that my experience of unruly kids riding their bikes through campsites (occupied or empty) while yelling at each other would upset most pets. I know it certainly pissed me off.

With respect to breed, I posted a follow-up comment discussing the reasoning of breed choice by dog owners. This comment was based upon conversations with the 3rd generation of owners of a pet boarding/grooming facility.

The question is basically "chicken and the egg". Are dobermans naturally aggressive, or are some people who purchase dobermans more likely to get a thrill over owning a breed with a reputation of being the neighborhood tough guy?

I completely respect your propensity to protect your pets. My issue is that problem dogs are not a dog problem but rather a dog owner problem.
I think it’s both. And because of that people who don’t have dogs or have never had dogs fear certain breeds. As I said above it would be an interesting random survey in a campground to ask people if they feared certain breeds and why.
 
I think it’s both. And because of that people who don’t have dogs or have never had dogs fear certain breeds. As I said above it would be an interesting random survey in a campground to ask people if they feared certain breeds and why.
We have a dog and have had many dogs. I will not go near a pit bull and will not let our grandchildren go near them. If our daughter brought one into their house I would take the grandkids from her. If someone is walking a pit bull I cross the street.
 
My 16lb Maine Coon mix cat would eat a dog. If we didn't keep her on a leash, she would go after any dog that barked or growled at her. She liked walking around the campgrounds in the mornings. But she loved our dog.
I can assure you an aggressive dog, pit bull, chow, etc. would dispatch a cat without hesitation. A Coyote will as well.
My own cat story involves a Blue and Gold Macaw. When I was working outside at home my Macaw would stand on the top of my 6' ladder and watch. One day the neighbors cat came stalking up and begin slowly climbing the ladder apparently after a quick kill. The Macaw patiently never moved while watching the cat approach. When the cat reached the top rung however he sunk his beak, which can crack a brazil nut like you would a peanut, into the cat. The cat left in a hurry, with it's remaining 8 lives.
 
Most of the time it's not the breed of the dog, but the breed of the owner.
So true, but the dog is the proverbial loose cannon and some breeds are more aggressive and need more/better owner management.

I think parks that have had dog problems go to banning selected breeds as a compromise to avoid banning all pets (and I know of a few that have gone to that extreme). They have to balance the concerns of all their customers, even if some of them are ill-informed.
 
My 16lb Maine Coon mix cat would eat a dog. If we didn't keep her on a leash, she would go after any dog that barked or growled at her. She liked walking around the campgrounds in the mornings. But she loved our dog.
I would think it would have to be a relatively small dog. I can pretty much guarantee that it couldn't whip my 90# lab. Assuming my lab wouldn't just point out the cabinet with the goodies and let it go at that.
 
I would think it would have to be a relatively small dog. I can pretty much guarantee that it couldn't whip my 90# lab. Assuming my lab wouldn't just point out the cabinet with the goodies and let it go at that.
From the standpoint of shear strength, the dog wins hands down. However if the cat is aggressive and sees the dog coming, watch out. I think many cats will convince even larger dogs they're barking up the wrong tree. Cats are very fast and their claws are very sharp. When fighting, they go for the face and if the dog gets a claw in the nose or eye, it will look for the fastest escape route.
 
From the standpoint of shear strength, the dog wins hands down. However if the cat is aggressive and sees the dog coming, watch out. I think many cats will convince even larger dogs they're barking up the wrong tree. Cats are very fast and their claws are very sharp. When fighting, they go for the face and if the dog gets a claw in the nose or eye, it will look for the fastest escape route.
We were at our neighbors house and a dog wandered into his yard, our neighbor said “watch this”. The cat bolted up to the dog, latched on to its rear end and started growling and biting the dog’s backside and wouldn’t let go until the dog left the property. The cat ran back to the back porch and resumed his nap. One of the funniest things I have ever seen. Our neighbor said about the cat “his name is Lucky”.
 
So true, but the dog is the proverbial loose cannon and some breeds are more aggressive and need more/better owner management.

I think parks that have had dog problems go to banning selected breeds as a compromise to avoid banning all pets (and I know of a few that have gone to that extreme). They have to balance the concerns of all their customers, even if some of them are ill-informed.

Still, it all comes down to the owner. Any dog can be trained to be aggressive. And any dog can be trained to be passive. One other problem with the 'aggressive dogs' is they way they have been bred. There are a lot of puppy mills out there that inbreed dogs. Pit bulls, classified as a dangerous breed, are not a purebred dog. They are cross breeds of an English Bulldog.
There are also small breed fur babies that are very aggressive. These have never been socialized with people or other dogs. These are the ones that look harmless until you get close to them, then they turn with teeth out.
We once met a man with a Golden Retriever, one of the gentlest breeds out there. He warned us to keep our distance. The dog was abused and trained to be mean. Even after 5 years, the dog could not be retrained.
 

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