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DonTom

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Apr 21, 2005
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Auburn, CA or Reno, NV
Rental apartments currently do not have chargers in every parking space either.
You won't need one in every spot unless everybody wants to charge at the same time.

But AFAIK, every new apartment building will have EV charging areas. And not just here in CA. I am noticing it mostly in NV.

You seem to think every EV charges every night. No more than gas cars getting gas every day.

-Don- Auburn, CA
 

DonTom

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Auburn, CA or Reno, NV
But the state cannot produce enough electricity now with alternative sources of energy, working with conventional means.
I wonder how China and Europe does it!

3.5 million EVs in China.

1.8 million EVs in GB

1.4 Millon EVs in the EU.

1.0 million in the USA.

425,000 EVs here in CA.

Around one million EVs in the USA (increasing here faster than I thought!). If Tesla could keep up with their orders, there would be a lot more!

-Don- Auburn, CA
 

Laura & Charles

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Joined
Jun 10, 2016
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998
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Could be anywhere. Originally from Ohio. Go Bucks!
What I’d like to see developed are EVs that are flat towable and capable of utilizing their regenerative braking to slow the whole train…. Maybe like a trailer brake controller set up. Probably would need to design a beefier tow bar.
With the available flat towable cars becoming rarer all the time, and the reason being their transmissions, it seems like a small, but niche market some (transmissionless) EV maker could fill.
Shoot, load up the coach with a Tesla Powerwall and boondocking with A/C running suddenly becomes possible.
 

DonTom

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Apr 21, 2005
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Auburn, CA or Reno, NV
Not performance, but distance between charges.
Usually not much of an issue when you can charge at home as often as you want.

Cold can make a 20% difference, IIRC. But even with my heaters on, seat heaters, etc, I cannot say I ever noticed the difference, but my normal long EV ride in winter is between here and Reno, which is only 100 miles/160 KM.

I would need to check to notice the difference. I normally don't. Even when I get to the other house I normally won't charge until after a few more days of use.

-Don- Auburn, CA
 

Jayflight

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Jan 22, 2021
Posts
905
You won't need one in every spot unless everybody wants to charge at the same time.

But AFAIK, every new apartment building will have EV charging areas. And not just here in CA. I am noticing it mostly in NV.

You seem to think every EV charges every night. No more than gas cars getting gas every day.

-Don- Auburn, CA
You were the one providing the notion that ev owners charge at night. Plus you were the one advocating that electricity should be turned off during the day for charging evs.

As it relates to China they have not stopped building coal power plants to provide electricity for its needs ..And the U.S.?

The numbers of Teslas being built has nothing to do with the working class being able to afford to upgrade their vehicles to an electric vehicle
 

Viajeros

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Apr 19, 2015
Posts
1,062
I can’t say we charge every day, but normal practice for us is if we arrive home under 70 percent we charge. We live in a place where winter storms and summer forest fires can take out the grid. We normally have our daily charge limit set for 85 but if we know a storm is coming we tweak that to 90. That way if there is an outage we are good for a week or two.
 

Old_Crow

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Nov 20, 2016
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3,778
Location
Quartzsite, AZ
I'm not necessarily a big fan of EV's, but in my entire work career of over 50 years the longest commute I ever had was a 138-mile round trip. I could easily do that with just about any EV on the market and not have to charge the thing while I was at work.
 

DonTom

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Auburn, CA or Reno, NV
The numbers of Teslas being built has nothing to do with the working class being able to afford to upgrade their vehicles to an electric vehicle
I expect the average EV to be cheaper than the average ICE car in a few years. But we have to wait and see.

Yeah, Telsa is the most common EV in the USA, but there are countless others that are cheaper and a few that are more expensive than Tesla.

EVs only have one expensive part (main battery) and that part gets cheaper with time.

-Don- Auburn, CA
 

Babe2201

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Jul 9, 2021
Posts
786
Location
Walpole, NH
I expect the average EV to be cheaper than the average ICE car in a few years. But we have to wait and see.

Yeah, Telsa is the most common EV in the USA, but there are countless others that are cheaper and a few that are more expensive than Tesla.

EVs only have one expensive part (main battery) and that part gets cheaper with time.

-Don- Auburn, CA
I guess as long as you expect they will be cheaper then everything will be ok. I do have to wonder as they get cheaper will the main component of them not be made as well so they wear out quicker.
 

Viajeros

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I guess as long as you expect they will be cheaper then everything will be ok. I do have to wonder as they get cheaper will the main component of them not be made as well so they wear out quicker.
I would think that is a sure way for a manufacturer to torpedo sales. Do gas car manufacturers deliberately do that?
 

uchu

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Sep 9, 2019
Posts
999
Location
Ontario, Canada
Could that not all change if gas prices came back down to normal? If gas is not costing so much then the EV might not look as such a great investment driving the market back to ICE again.
It won't. At least in the long term. Climate change is real, at least the part about ICE pollution, so EVs will be slowly but surely take over the roads. Not only in the USA, but worldwide (eventually).
 

Babe2201

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786
Location
Walpole, NH
I would think that is a sure way for a manufacturer to torpedo sales. Do gas car manufacturers deliberately do that?
If the demand goes up the way some think it will they will have to cut corners somehow. Gas car manufacturers have certainly made things lower quality to keep costs down at times.
 

Babe2201

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786
Location
Walpole, NH
It won't. At least in the long term. Climate change is real, at least the part about ICE pollution, so EVs will be slowly but surely take over the roads. Not only in the USA, but worldwide (eventually).
The problem of climate change is extremely exaggerated and how much proof is there that it is caused by humans? The sky is not falling.
 

Jayflight

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Jan 22, 2021
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905
Lets talk about the current state of affairs with the pros and cons of EVs, from this simple guy. With ICE vehicles the domestic sub compact and compact vehicles, which dealt with with the CAFE standards have proven to be junk.

But if you patch them up you can pull into a local gas station and get gas and if the 3 or four year battery thats in it can be replaced for around 100 bucks, to the extreme of 200 bucks.

Some how the engineers have figured out how long a part will work until the warranty expires. Then you are on your own, which is usually the lower income folks thats buying the get around sedans.

So as some advocate that there may be some cheaper EVs than the Telsa, the EV battery, thats second to the electric motor to operate the EV costs way more to replace for the ones that can least afford them. So what good has going EVs on the lower end done for anything, except for a feel good moment. The EV vehicle is rendered useless while I suspect money ican still owed on them.

You guys can post all the numbers being sold, But you ignore the proportions of the total drivers on the road with misc branded vehicles.


  • US Number of Registered Vehicles was reported at 275,924,442 Unit in Dec 2020.
The recorded numbers of combined EVs and hybrids is showing in 2022.

How Many Electric Vehicles Are There In The U.S.? 19+ Stats!


With over 6.8 million plug-in and hybrid electric cars and 2 million electric cars on the road in the United States,

So while we read here that people are rushing to buy EVs , a good math major or a simpleton can do the math and the percentage is peanuts. But this shows the breakdown.Are these numbers incorrect?

p Electric Car Statistics And Facts:


  • More than 2 million electric cars are currently on the road in the United States.

  • Over 6.8 million plug-in and electric vehicles are on American roads.

  • In 2021, 20% of passenger cars bought were electric.

  • Only 1% of the automobiles on American roads are electric.

  • 5% of all automobile sales are electric

  • By the end of 2022, there could be 100 different electronic automobile models to select from for U.S. consumers.

  • In 2021, 20% of passenger cars bought were electric.

  • In 2018, almost 330,000 electric vehicles were sold in the United States.

  • The percent of Americans who drive electric or hybrid vehicles is 7%.

  • Approximately 39% of vehicle consumers are looking to buy an electric automobile.
In conclusion, the report states there is 7 percent of combine drivers currently driving the new age vehicles. So Telsa owners and related automobiles companies and the transportation department has a really long ways to go to say that EVs are overtaking the automobile industry . And tax credits are just a handout to most folks that do not need assistance to buy any vehicle, much less an EV automobile.
 
Last edited:

Viajeros

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Apr 19, 2015
Posts
1,062
The problem of climate change is extremely exaggerated and how much proof is there that it is caused by humans? The sky is not falling.
I won’t get into the climate change discussion because quite frankly I know nothing about it. But what will drive people into EV’s is the driving experience, the performance, the tech, the convenience of fueling at home and for the high mileage commuters the economics.

They don’t suit everyone’s needs or wants of course but they strike a chord with A LOT of people. Tesla builds roughly 5000 cars per day right now and is no where close to fulfilling demand…and they are only sold in about 30 countries and they only have four models. No one is forcing anyone to buy them, they are just that popular. Everyone likes to give them a hard time about the Cybertruck and yet it is sold out for years.

There are a couple of manufacturers (Toyota and Mazda) who have rejected the whole EV concept and of course they will find their own market in gas vehicles for years. Nothing wrong with that. It’s a big marketplace.

The next decade will be interesting.
 

Babe2201

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Joined
Jul 9, 2021
Posts
786
Location
Walpole, NH
I won’t get into the climate change discussion because quite frankly I know nothing about it. But what will drive people into EV’s is the driving experience, the performance, the tech, the convenience of fueling at home and for the high mileage commuters the economics.

They don’t suit everyone’s needs or wants of course but they strike a chord with A LOT of people. Tesla builds roughly 5000 cars per day right now and is no where close to fulfilling demand…and they are only sold in about 30 countries and they only have four models. No one is forcing anyone to buy them, they are just that popular. Everyone likes to give them a hard time about the Cybertruck and yet it is sold out for years.

There are a couple of manufacturers (Toyota and Mazda) who have rejected the whole EV concept and of course they will find their own market in gas vehicles for years. Nothing wrong with that. It’s a big marketplace.

The next decade will be interesting.
I agree with most of what you say but if certain people have their way everyone will be forced to buy one if they want a new car. I also think high fuel prices make people buy them as well.
 

Jayflight

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 22, 2021
Posts
905
What's your explanation for the recent rapid global warming shown in this graphic?

This is more huffing and puffing. You can find all sorts of stories that fits your mindset. Enjoy the read.


And this, Look at the date of this story, April 22, 2009
but we are still around watching and waiting for the Earth to spontaneous combust.


• “The Earth’s Cooling Climate,” Science News, November 15, 1969.• “Colder Winters Held Dawn of New Ice Age,” Washington Post, January 11, 1970.• “Science: Another Ice Age?” Time Magazine, June 24, 1974.• “The Ice Age Cometh!” Science News, March 1, 1975.• “The Cooling World,” Newsweek, April 28, 1975.• “Scientists Ask Why World Climate is Changing; Major Cooling May Be Ahead,” New York Times, May 21, 1975.• “In the Grip of a New Ice Age?” International Wildlife July-August, 1975.• “A Major Cooling Widely Considered to Be Inevitable,” New York Times, September 14, 1975.• “Variations in the Earth’s Orbit, Pacemaker of the Ice Ages,” Science magazine, December 10, 1976.
 

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