exhaust brake

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

normeller

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 19, 2006
Posts
53
I am considering exhaust brake for Ford f250. In Jake brakes literature they say they do not make a brake for Ford due to the fact that Ford states that they will cause damage to the 7.3 engine because of low valve pressure. Has anyone used an exhaust brake on ford for long period of time and what brand? :D
 

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Posts
74,650
Location
At our Silver Springs FL home
BD, PAC & Banks all make one, as does US Gear (the D-Cellerator brand name). Presumably they control the amount of back pressure to avoid damage.  Newer Powerstrokes have stronger valve springs than older models anyway. You didn't mention what year yours is, but if you have a Superduty (1999 and later) you should have no problem.

There is also a kit for the Powerstroke called the Lange brake, which utilizes a warm-up baffle in the exahust to provide modest back pressure. It is a manually controlled system that works fairly well and is inexpensive. The back pressure is limited by a bypass designed in by Ford, so does not exceed Ford specified pressures. See http://www.exhaustbrake.com/
 

haffcke

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2006
Posts
7
I have a 99 E350 with auto tranny so will I have to lock up the t conveter? if so how? thanks, Phil.
 

Karl

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Mar 3, 2005
Posts
5,154
Location
Elkhart Lake, WI for the summer. Work at Road Amer
haffcke,

Either you have a lock-up torque converter or you don't. There's no way to make one lock up if it isn't designed and built to do so, and even those that are, are controlled by coolant temperature, speed, overdrive lockout, and engine manifold vacuum - all things you have no control over. And, if I'm not mistaken, your E-350 is a gas engine, so a Jake Brake doesn't apply at all. They're just for diesels.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Posts
74,650
Location
At our Silver Springs FL home
I think all the 99's have the 4R100 transmission, which has a lock-up toque converter. The F350 diesel and V10 do, so I would expect the E350 also has it, but it is possible the smaller engines use a different tranny.
 

haffcke

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2006
Posts
7
mine is a 99 E350 super duty 1 ton van with a 7.3 diesel, auto tyranny. I'm pulling a 34ft yellowstone with 2 slides weight 10500lbs and with van loaded at 9600lb I'm a little over, but that's the way it is, problem is I live in the mountains and have allready had to replace roters once,(warpage) and I do adjust up  my brake control descending  but I have had a couple of scary events where 2/3 down Sam's gap in east TN. my brakes were fading out, I was intrested in the backpreshor exhaust brake because it sounds simple but under stood that I'd have to lock up my t,converter for it to work. so armed with new knollage can you advise, please?? thanks Phil.
 

Karl

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Mar 3, 2005
Posts
5,154
Location
Elkhart Lake, WI for the summer. Work at Road Amer
I'm afraid I can't help with specifics about the exhaust brake, but Gary has already provided some manufacturers to check with. Regarding the lock-up torque converter however, maybe I can shed some light on that. As you know, a torque converter has a internal rotor and an external stator (the converter housing), both having blades like a fan, or more accurately like a jet engine. The rotor and stator are not directly coupled, but are immersed in transmission fluid. Thus the rotor, turned by the engine, starts the transmission fluid swirling, which in turn spins the stator, and consequently the transmission gears, driveshaft, rear end, and finally the drive wheels. This fluid coupling is not perfect and some slippage occurs. The newer lock-up torque converters will actually lock the rotor and stator together physically under controlled conditions, to eliminate this slippage. As you might expect, a torque converter can work in reverse too, the rear wheels transmitting power to the engine when decelerating with your foot off of the gas. If you have an older style, non-lock-up converter (doubtful), the exhaust brake will still work with it and provide engine braking - maybe not quite as much, but it will still get the job done.

A suggestion: Maybe you do this already, but it is recommended that when going down steep grades, short, moderate application of the brakes should be used to control speed rather than light, constant application. Sometimes even heavy applications are needed, but this will allow the rotors to cool between brake application and will help prevent rotor warpage and fading.     
 

haffcke

Member
Joined
Mar 7, 2006
Posts
7
Thank you for the input, lateley I've been slowing down before I start decending down the bigs mountians puting it in 2nd and taping breaks as needed, slower  but safer I try to keep it around 45.  thanks again, Phil.
 
Top Bottom