Extension cord

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

hope

New member
Joined
Dec 21, 2017
Posts
3
We have a 5th wheel, we?re pretty new at it. What kind of extension cord is needed to plug into the house for power to the rig.  Thanks
 

Prior member

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 20, 2015
Posts
1,232
It depends on what you want to run, and what service your fifth wheel has.
If you have a  30amp panel in your rig, you can get an adapter that takes your 30 amp cable to a 20 amp one and just get a good heavy duty house extension cord and plug it into any 20 amp house receptacle
Your other option is to install a new 120 volt single pole  30 amp breaker in your house panel and then install a new 30 amp female receptacle to plug your trailer cable into.
If you have a 220 volt 50 amp trailer panel you can go a similar route, but it will have to be a two pole 220 volt breaker and 220 volt receptacle

jack l
 

John From Detroit

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 12, 2005
Posts
25,223
Location
Davison Michigan
Remember the old Burger King Commercials
"The bigger the burger the better the burger" same applies to extension cords.

FOr your job I'd likely use a 12ga Extension cord from Sears/K-Mart with a locking button on the outlet and a PUCK type 15 to 30 or 50 adapter.. To your regular RV cord.

But a better option would be a 30 or 50 (Depending) amp RV extension cord. if it's long enough.

THat said though.  I'd .. Well I DO use the 12 ga cord from Sears/K-Mart  So that's what I'd suggest.
 

HueyPilotVN

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 5, 2012
Posts
2,421
Location
Lake Havasu City, AZ
This link to a post might give you some idea of how to hook up your electric along with pictures.

It does not address the conduit or such things as permits if needed, but it does show the basics.

Hope it helps.  Also be sure that it is not confused with a 220 dryer hookup.

http://www.rvforum.net/SMF_forum/index.php/topic,66762.msg611714.html#msg611714

edit:  Give me a couple of minutes and I will swap the photobucket pictures for inserted pictures.

Done, do not bother to click on the photobucket pictures.  Just look at the second post for them.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Posts
74,604
Location
At our Silver Springs FL home
It's easy for this topic to get over-complicated, but if you are plugging to a typical household outlet, you have a max of 15A (amps) available at the outlet, assuming nothing else in the house shares that circuit (unlikely).  In that case an extension rated for 15 amps over a length of 25 ft should be sufficient when added to your RV shore cord.  The 12 gauge cord that John recommends will do nicely and a heavy duty outdoor-use cord like that is available most places where heavier duty extensions are sold, e.g. Lowes, Home Depot, hardware stores, Sears, Harbor Freight, Menards, Amazon.com, etc. Walamrt may have them, but read the package carefully.  The key description words are "12 gauge" and "outdoor".

If you need an adapter to plug in, Walmarts have them, 30A female to 15A male. Below  I've linked to the puck type or the slightly longer dogbone type (I prefer the latter).
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Road-Power-30-15-Amp-RV-Power-Adapter/16817350
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Road-Power-RV-Cord-Adapter/16817356
 
G

Guest

Guest
And always look for the UL logo on the cord.  Alot of cords such as the ones you may get at the dollar store could be made in other countries and could also be manufactured with cheap thin wire which can get hot and catch fire easily.  Yes there have even been crooks that have attempted to fake the UL label and even those that steal UL labels off other items and put them on their product. 

However a good inspection of the product specs and the product itself can help you decide if its quality or not.  If the cord feels cheap and thin it probably is.

I carry several cords with me, one long 15a for running things like my leaf blower or something like that.  And i carry two large black heavy duty 30a cords in case i need to hook them together. 

And dont forget the yellow adapter as well.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Posts
74,604
Location
At our Silver Springs FL home
manufactured with cheap thin wire which can get hot and catch fire easily.
That's why you have to look at the wire gauge (#12 recommended in this case).  You can't rely on the cord color or hyped up claims on a spiffy label to determine the electrical capacity.  Yeah, I suppose the cord could be mislabeled, but that's not a common issue (in my opinion). 
 

grashley

Well-known member
Joined
May 7, 2015
Posts
6,586
Location
Western Kentucky
All good advise.

The entire question comes down to what you want to run in the FW.

For keeping the battery charged and a few lights and a fan, 15A is plenty of power.
Adding an A/C unit will likely need 20A.  Either need can be filled with a 12 gauge extension and adapter connected to your shore cord.

If you want to run both A/C or use electricity for a water heater or refrigerator, then more power is needed.  For a 30A camper, use a 30A extension cord from a PROPERLY WIRED 120VAC house receptacle. 
For a 50A camper, there are two or three choices.  Use a 30A receptacle, extension and adapter  -  OR  -  use a 50A 240V receptacle and a 50A extension cord (expensive cord!)  -  OR  - use a 50A receptacle - adapter - 30 A extension cord - adapter - camper shore power cord.

Personally, I use the last option.  Just make sure you limit your power usage to 30A, because there is a 30A MAX cord in the circuit with both the house and camper using a 50A breaker.

One other note:  When I used the 20A GFCI receptacle to power the camper, it tripped every night due to the dew getting the 120V - 240V adapter wet.  I much prefer the 30A cord!
 

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
120,587
Posts
1,211,525
Members
125,688
Latest member
TZARTOMJR
Top Bottom