F150 with 3.5 ecoboost or Ram 1500 ?

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shelley354

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With the newer models out now, which would you choose? Or please share  your experiences thanks towing a TT or 5th wheel around 9000lbs all in.
 

shelley354

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so why do they say this?

Engine Max. Towing Capacity* Max. Payload Capacity*
2.7L EcoBoost? Twin-Turbocharged V6 9,000 lbs. 2,470 lbs.
3.0L Power Stroke? Turbo Diesel V6 11,400 lbs. 2,020 lbs.
5.0L Ti-VCT V8 11,600 lbs. 3,270 lbs.
3.5L EcoBoost? Twin-Turbocharged V6 13,200 lbs. 3,230 lbs.

I was looking at the 3.5L ecoboost? Max Towing 13,200lbs, max payload 3,230 lbs

Thanks


gravesdiesel said:
You need at least a 2500 or better yet a 3500 SRW to pull that.
 

SeilerBird

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The main reason is because most noobies don't get it right the first time. They almost always go way too small trying to save money on gas and it is easier to park and drive. Then they want to trade it in on a larger vehicle. With a 1/2 ton you need to upgrade the trailer and the truck. With a one ton you only have to upgrade the trailer. Also you need to remember there is more to towing than can my truck pull this. A half ton can pull a 727. The problems are towing in mountains and towing in a wind storm or when a semi passes you. With a 1/2 ton that is generally a white knuckle experience.
 

gravesdiesel

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Exactly as SeilerBird said.  Also remember your payload capacity includes the pin weight of the fifth wheel, your gear, fuel, passengers, etc.  It is very easy to exceed that on a little "half ton" truck, plus they have passenger car rated tires, much smaller brakes and lighter duty transmissions, axles and cooling systems compared to the 2500 and 3500 trucks.
 

medic868

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Check out this link https://www.ford.com/services/assets/Brochure?make=Ford&model=F-150&year=2018
pages 23 & 24 explain the towing capacities and payload.
The figures you are quoting are for a base model (XL) with max towing and heavy duty payload packages, regular cab 4X2 8' box with a 150lb driver and no options.
Every option you add (ie. power windows, door locks, SYNC, cab size, bed size, tire size, 4X4, moonroof, AC, etc.) adds to the weight and is subtracted from their 'best in class' payload and towing.
My trucks 'best' is
F-350
BEST MAXIMUM CAPABILITIES
5th-Wheel Towing: 23,200 lbs.
Conventional Towing: 18,500 lbs.
Payload: 7,260 lbs.
GCWR: 30,500 lbs.
GVWR: 14,000 lbs.
Front GAWR: 5,250 lbs. (4x2); 6,000 lbs. (4x4)

My actual truck is GVWR 11,500 lbs, GCVWR 23,000 lbs.  & 3,529 lbs payload.

 

Lowell

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SeilerBird said:
The problems are towing in mountains and towing in a wind storm or when a semi passes you. With a 1/2 ton that is generally a white knuckle experience.

I disagree with the above statement.  I have been towing a TT for the last 13 years with a Dodge Ram 1500 1/2 ton pickup. I have towed in mountains as high as 11,000 ft. I have towed in the desert at temperatures above 110 F. I have towed in rain and snow. And have towed in heavy semi traffic on the interstate and smaller highways. I have never had a feeling of "white knuckle" or handling concern.

One only needs to select a trailer that is matched to the truck capabilities and not exceed those capabilities, be it a 1/2 ton or 1 ton.

My truck has just under 100,000 miles now and only about 24, 000 of those miles has been towing a TT.  Why would I want a heavier truck when I only tow about 25% of the time.  I would have given up fuel economy and ride quality for 75% of it life for no good reason.  My 2 cents,
 

Krow

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I tow a 25'  bumper pull (6200') with a 2016 Ford Eco-Boost - max tow package.  No problems.  Wherever I see someone with a similar truck, especially an Eco-Boost, I ask how they like it, how it handles their trailer, etc.  I've seen a LOT towing trailers a lot heavier and longer and higher than mine.  Nobody has ever reported any "nail-biting" experiences.  This past weekend I spoke to a fellow that has over 110,000 km (~70,000 mi) on his 2015.  He's been from here in NB, Can to southern Cal I think 4 times pulling his 5th wheel.  His is a 2wd with HD tow package.  He did say he had an extra leaf put in his rear springs.  I don't know the specs on is 5th wheel but the trailer was by no means a small one. He had nothing but praises for the truck.  Of course, these types of anecdotal reviews are far from scientific.  But neither are the statements that everyone needs a 3500 diesel dually.  That said, I don't think I would consider pulling a 35' 9000' TT with my truck although I have seen more than a few that are - not just Ford but Dodge and Chev 1500s as well.
 

solarman

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Texas
shelley354 said:
so why do they say this?

Engine Max. Towing Capacity* Max. Payload Capacity*
2.7L EcoBoost? Twin-Turbocharged V6 9,000 lbs. 2,470 lbs.
3.0L Power Stroke? Turbo Diesel V6 11,400 lbs. 2,020 lbs.
5.0L Ti-VCT V8 11,600 lbs. 3,270 lbs.
3.5L EcoBoost? Twin-Turbocharged V6 13,200 lbs. 3,230 lbs.

I was looking at the 3.5L ecoboost? Max Towing 13,200lbs, max payload 3,230 lbs

Thanks

these people will exaggerate anything to sell a vehicle.. just like "unlimited" phone service that has "data caps'

i have towed 9000+ with a half ton and its not comfortable, it's just not good practice to stress a vehicle at or near it's maximum capabilities
in my opinion it's far better to have more capability than you need, far less wear and tear on the vehicle and easier on the driver
that's why I tow 9000 with a RAM 2500 CTD.  I even get much better MPG from it than my previous 1/2 ton and it's a stress free drive
especially in the mountains.

 

Scott 3

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There have been a lot of technical upgrades to trucks in recent years.  I've been reading different truck forums recently because I'm in the market for a truck.  A common theme I see is that today's 1500s and 150s have more power (hp and torque) than 2500s and 250s of old and in some cases possibly 350s or 3500s.  Supposedly frames and brakes on 150s and 1500s are stronger and bigger than before.  I am by no means advocating pulling a 5th wheel with a 150 or 1500.  It is possible though that 150s and 1500s are being underestimated based on outdated reference points.  Many on this forum advocate buying used trucks and RVs in order to save money.  It is possible that some proponents of used vehicles have not kept up on recent truck upgrades.
 

Gods Country

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Sure a few 1/2 ton trucks can carry the weight.  That's the issue.  You're posting generic information for those few trucks (because that's how auto makers roll).  You need to find the correct match for the vehicle you intend to purchase, and most times that will involve getting the specs from the yellow sticker on the driver side door frame of each vehicle you are considering.  If you wanted to pull a trailer that was 6k loaded there wouldn't be much issue.  Because most people want as much trailer with as little truck as possible you need to do your homework.
 

shelley354

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Thank you - thats what my thoughts were- we wouldn't be driving at stupid fast speeds and I have seen you tube "tests" of a half ton pulling a 9300lb with no issues into and over the mountains in Nevada.


Lowell said:
I disagree with the above statement.  I have been towing a TT for the last 13 years with a Dodge Ram 1500 1/2 ton pickup. I have towed in mountains as high as 11,000 ft. I have towed in the desert at temperatures above 110 F. I have towed in rain and snow. And have towed in heavy semi traffic on the interstate and smaller highways. I have never had a feeling of "white knuckle" or handling concern.

One only needs to select a trailer that is matched to the truck capabilities and not exceed those capabilities, be it a 1/2 ton or 1 ton.

My truck has just under 100,000 miles now and only about 24, 000 of those miles has been towing a TT.  Why would I want a heavier truck when I only tow about 25% of the time.  I would have given up fuel economy and ride quality for 75% of it life for no good reason.  My 2 cents,
 

shelley354

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Thanks will do.

Gods Country said:
Sure a few 1/2 ton trucks can carry the weight.  That's the issue.  You're posting generic information for those few trucks (because that's how auto makers roll).  You need to find the correct match for the vehicle you intend to purchase, and most times that will involve getting the specs from the yellow sticker on the driver side door frame of each vehicle you are considering.  If you wanted to pull a trailer that was 6k loaded there wouldn't be much issue.  Because most people want as much trailer with as little truck as possible you need to do your homework.
 

shelley354

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How many "naysayers" have actually had a go with the newer spec trucks? The newer trucks as you say are built a lot differently than the older ones and the gear ratios are also different.


OBX said:
There have been a lot of technical upgrades to trucks in recent years.  I've been reading different truck forums recently because I'm in the market for a truck.  A common theme I see is that today's 1500s and 150s have more power (hp and torque) than 2500s and 250s of old and in some cases possibly 350s or 3500s.  Supposedly frames and brakes on 150s and 1500s are stronger and bigger than before.  I am by no means advocating pulling a 5th wheel with a 150 or 1500.  It is possible though that 150s and 1500s are being underestimated based on outdated reference points.  Many on this forum advocate buying used trucks and RVs in order to save money.  It is possible that some proponents of used vehicles have not kept up on recent truck upgrades.
 

shelley354

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solarman said:
these people will exaggerate anything to sell a vehicle.. just like "unlimited" phone service that has "data caps'

i have towed 9000+ with a half ton and its not comfortable, it's just not good practice to stress a vehicle at or near it's maximum capabilities
in my opinion it's far better to have more capability than you need, far less wear and tear on the vehicle and easier on the driver
that's why I tow 9000 with a RAM 2500 CTD.  I even get much better MPG from it than my previous 1/2 ton and it's a stress free drive
especially in the mountains.

what year was your half ton?
 

solarman

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shelley354 said:
what year was your half ton?

both mine, 2013 F150 xlt and my wife's 2015 Trundra 5.7 SR5
i was not happy with their abilities so traded to a 2500 CTD 4x4

now i'm a real happy camper..

 

gravesdiesel

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solarman said:
both mine, 2013 F150 xlt and my wife's 2015 Trundra 5.7 SR5
i was not happy with their abilities so traded to a 2500 CTD 4x4

now i'm a real happy camper..
Great move!  I love my Cummins Diesel powered Dodge Ram trucks too.  I get my new 4500 later this week!
 

Logger Joe

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I agree with a few peoples opinions here, why buy a larger heavier truck if your only going to pull your TT a small percentage of its life?  Its a waste of money.

I personally wouldnt pull a 9000lb trailer with a half ton and good luck finding a truck on a lot that actually has the specs posted on that web site.

Heres what I learned on my search for a tt that my 17 ram 1500 max tow could safely tow.
First, your CCC or cargo carrying Capacity is the first thing that you will exceed on a half ton(9000lbs means a minimum of 900lb hitch weight, but in reality it will be closer to 1170lbs)
Second, the towing numbers most auto makers post is a farse.  Read the fine print, its usually a half tank of fuel and only a driver of 150lbs max.  That means zero family and zero "stuff" in the truck with you.

The other question should be, what is the actual weight of your TT you want? Is the 9000lbs the gvwr or the empty weight?

Im not saying you need a larger rig, juat be sure that you match YOUR truck to YOUR trailer!!!

My trucks specs are 2017 ram 1500 3.92 axle, max tow package, CCC 1493lbs, only options I have are power windows and door locks.  Dodge says max towing is 10140lbs, after I load my family and a few bikes in the box and then my tts hitch weight Im maxed out and my tt weighs in at 7600gvwr and actual ready to camp weight closer to 6300lbs....

Good luck with your search and your purchase....
 

Scott 3

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Logger Joe, you are correct, no doubt.  The 2019 Ram 1500, 5.7 V8, 3.92, Crew Cab, 5'7" bed has CCC of 1,800 and 11,290 tow.  The stiffened frame and larger brakes may be the difference maker. 

I'm hoping the new 2500s come out before we make our purchase.  I want to see what their updated numbers are to make a good comparison.
 

Logger Joe

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Im going to guess the suspension was upgraded a bit too, my brakes are adequate, but Id hate to lose the trailer brakes on a long steep decent in the mountains as that would be a hair raising experience to say the least.  Also, my truck just driving around empty is an amazing ride, a huge upgrade from my 07 1500 ram that rode like a rock truck on rubber block suspension.  But when Im towing I find it a bit soggy despite the heavy duty rear springs.

Match your truck to your trailer, not the other way around ;)
 

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