Francis Scott Key bridge, Baltimore, MD

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Pilot has ultimate authority to decide if conditions are satisfactory to navigate the waterway. Weather conditions, ship conditions, crew condition, or any other thing they might find of concern. If the pilot says no go, it doesn't go.
There are reports the ship was having power problems while at the dock, loading.
Not true. The ship's captain always maintains overriding authority on his/her vessel.
The harbor pilot is actually never in charge, the vessels master or senior officer is and he can override at anytime the harbor pilots instructions to the helm. Otherwise, the harbor pilot, has nothing to do with the internal operation of the vessel and has zero authority on board other than his limited authority in the navigation of the vessel.
This is true.
 
The ship had indeed been under repair while in port. It was, in fact, delayed from scheduled departure due to the repairs being performed.
The big question will be whether the ship was properly cleared on the repairs before the Pilot authorized the departure, and how the repairs were verified before that clearance was issued. And, of course, was the power failure related to the repair activity.
The pilot does not "authorize" departure. The ship's captain remains in complete control of the vessel at all times, and it is he/she who determines when to depart. The only job the pilot has is to navigate the ship clear of port. If the pilot is in disagreement, he/she can refuse to participate but they have no say-so as to whether or not the ship attempts to leave port.
 
And if the pilot refuses to cooperate, the ship goes nowhere.
Not a correct statement. The captain can still decide to leave port even if the pilot and Harbor Control disagree. There may be consequences (fines, etc.) to that captain's decision to override the pilot, but it can and has happened. Try to tell a destroyer or carrier captain that his ship cannot leave port for whatever reason, when he has orders to sail at first opportunity.
 
Pilot has ultimate authority to decide if conditions are satisfactory to navigate the waterway. Weather conditions, ship conditions, crew condition, or any other thing they might find of concern. If the pilot says no go, it doesn't go.
There are reports the ship was having power problems while at the dock, loading.
This is true but either the Technicians/mechanics said "All Fixed" or management told them to sit down and shut up we are going to sail... Now in the first case.. It is possible that the problems they WERE having WERE fixed but another problem came about.. It's also possible they messed up fixing it.. In either case I hope the FBI's technicians figure it out.

IN the latter case.... Heads need to roll at least figuratively speaking And I hope the FBI figures otu who needs a Murder charge filed.
 
The pilot does not "authorize" departure. The ship's captain remains in complete control of the vessel at all times, and it is he/she who determines when to depart. The only job the pilot has is to navigate the ship clear of port. If the pilot is in disagreement, he/she can refuse to participate but they have no say-so as to whether or not the ship attempts to leave port.
You are correct. Sorry. I meant port authority authorizes departure.
 
And if the pilot refuses to cooperate, the ship goes nowhere.
Refuses to cooperate with what? He boards the vessel and goes directly to the wheelhouse, he doesn't inspect anything, he doesn't read the logs, his job is to tell the tugs where to tie off, get the vessel underway, and guide it to the sea buoy. The ship's officers are under no obligation nor would they discuss operational issues with the harbor pilot.
 
This is true. My uncle was Chief Harbor Pilot in San Diego for 30 years. Should the ship lose power there is nothing he can do about it until the crew fixes the issue.
Nor would the pilot interfere, he's there to assist in navigating the vessel between the sea buoy and it's berth, he has zero input on vessel operations outside that narrow responsibility.
 
This is true but either the Technicians/mechanics said "All Fixed" or management told them to sit down and shut up we are going to sail... Now in the first case.. It is possible that the problems they WERE having WERE fixed but another problem came about.. It's also possible they messed up fixing it.. In either case I hope the FBI's technicians figure it out.

IN the latter case.... Heads need to roll at least figuratively speaking And I hope the FBI figures otu who needs a Murder charge filed.
That FBI technician specializing in container vessel power plants?
 
Nor would the pilot interfere, he's there to assist in navigating the vessel between the sea buoy and it's berth, he has zero input on vessel operations outside that narrow responsibility.
Pretty sure they conduct a "pilot exchange" conversation, with the master of the vessel, where the master of the vessel describes where they are going, what the characteristics/conditions of the ship are, who’s on the bridge, what their first language is and the air draft of the vessel, which refers to how high out of the water the vessel is, so that you know whether you can take the ship under a bridge safely.
 
Pretty sure they conduct a "pilot exchange" conversation, with the master of the vessel, where the master of the vessel describes where they are going, what the characteristics/conditions of the ship are, who’s on the bridge, what their first language is and the air draft of the vessel, which refers to how high out of the water the vessel is, so that you know whether you can take the ship under a bridge safely.
You’re pretty sure?
 
Given that a port such as this receives ships from all over the world, I wonder how communications between crews speaking many different languages are dealt with?
There will be an officer in the wheelhouse who speaks English and all CG and vessel traffic on VHF Chan 16 is in English. The pilot doesn’t issue orders to the vessels crew, he’s not in charge of vessel operations,
 
Trust me they will find one.. Do you know how many FBI agents have college degrees?
At one time, I seem to recall, an agent had to be either a lawyer or Doctor (They have relaxed that).
Most people don’t realize how many FBI agents are pediatricians and dermatologist's.
 
The pilot doesn’t issue orders to the vessels crew, he’s not in charge of vessel operations,
Understood. My question was more general wondering how given what likely are multiple languages involved, how communications are carried out between the various parties that are involved in port management.
 
Trust me they will find one.. Do you know how many FBI agents have college degrees?
At one time, I seem to recall, an agent had to be either a lawyer or Doctor (They have relaxed that).
Accounting and Law degrees were what they wanted back in the day when I was looking into a career with them.
 
Understood. My question was more general wondering how given what likely are multiple languages involved, how communications are carried out between the various parties that are involved in port management.
Isn’t English the universal language? No matter which country you go to, someone will speak english
 
As a former US Coastguardsman (MSO LA/LB formerly CoTP) '77-'83 I am finding these conversations very interesting. Some seem to be spot on, and some well... not so much. Some of my time was spent doing anchorage boardings, some hazmat, and some SAR. All 11th District. I would consider offering an opinion but I was in so long ago that many of the policies and procedures have probably changed that I fear I would simply muddy up the waters, so to speak. Carry On.
 
Given that a port such as this receives ships from all over the world, I wonder how communications between crews speaking many different languages are dealt with?
Chief Boatsman's Mate his job is translator.

Seriously I suspect it's like airplanes.. There is a language subset that is unique to aircraft. And all international pilots must know the ENGLISH version of it. A couiple decades ago part of Canada passed laws French OR English and suddenly their airports got real real quiet.. then they put an exception in that air/ground/approach/departure controllers needed to speak ENGLISH at international airports and the planes returned. (Actually I think the threat of a pilot strike was enough)

Same with Boats. There is a designated "international language of the Sea" which I assume may well be english or Greek and all the pilots speak it. as does either the Chief or the Ship's master.
 

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