Fuel In The Tank of A DP

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Scottro

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Joined
Feb 28, 2021
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38
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Orlando
I’m not absolutely sure how much this rig has been driven in the last 6-months Is there an additive or supplement of any kind that I can add to my fuel to help with possible condensation in the tank? Something that may concentrate water droplets so the engine can combust it.
Again, I do not even know if condensation is present but I don’t want it to be a problem.
 

SargeW

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Dec 12, 2008
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Where ever we park it!
Many rigs sit for at least 6 months a year if they live in the northeast. The amount of condensation would be minimal, if at all. It can also depend on the amount of fuel that was in the tank when it was parked. The rig also likely has a fuel/water separator somewhere in the fuel line, often combined with the fuel filter itself. If there wasn't much fuel in the tank, take it down and fill it with fresh diesel. If it was near full there probably won't be any issues at all.
 

Tom

Administrator
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Jan 13, 2005
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48,458
Adding to Marty's comments ... bacteria and fungi can still grow in the diesel, and can clog up filters. For long-term storage, it's a good idea to add a biocide such as Bioguard.
 

Skookum

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Joined
Dec 19, 2018
Posts
122
My rig sat for 6 months before we bought it. I emptied the fuel/water separator and ran the tank down to near empty. Once it was refilled and had some of the new fuel run through, I changed out the fuel filter just to be sure.
 

Scottro

Active member
Joined
Feb 28, 2021
Posts
38
Location
Orlando
Isopropyl alcohol is cheap and works well with diesel fuel. If you live in a humid climate a biocide is a wise investment.
Roy...do you just put the alcohol in the tank with the diesel? If so, how much?
And thanks
 

Matt_C

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Joined
Mar 4, 2019
Posts
348
Location
SE - Mich
Scottro,
It is only a dumb question if you are too stupid to realize that there is something you don't know and maybe you should know it.
I can't answer this because I never used alcohol in the fuel of any of my diesels or anybody else's for that matter.
The actual fact is that you are better off letting the water separating filter do it's job. They are good at what they do. Most are set up to be easily drained of the water that they have collected.
I can tell you that you should collect the numbers of the filters on the engine and order spares now. They will not be cheap, but not having them in the coach's kit will be an expensive mistake.
It seems that you do not have much service history on this coach. That be the case, change out all the filters now. Less that will cost money. If you wanted to save money, you should not have purchase an RV at all. A recliner and a bid screen TV would have been a lot less expensive.
After you get up off the floor when you are told the price of the complete filter set, and managed to carry them home, go on the web and find out where to get a better deal. You need to buy the first set locally so you know for an absolute fact where that they can be gotten on short notice.
You need to know how to replace all of them and how to bleed the fuel system to restart the main engine. This should all be in the engine manual. If you travel in a diesel anything, there is the chance that you will pick up a load of bad fuel.
What does this guy know?? Well I am a licensed ship's engineer (Chief stream or motor) and have been taking care of very expensive engines for a very long time. I have also owned five diesel road vehicles over that time. I have seen a lot of damage done by lack of attention.
Matt
 

Scottro

Active member
Joined
Feb 28, 2021
Posts
38
Location
Orlando
Scottro,
It is only a dumb question if you are too stupid to realize that there is something you don't know and maybe you should know it.
I can't answer this because I never used alcohol in the fuel of any of my diesels or anybody else's for that matter.
The actual fact is that you are better off letting the water separating filter do it's job. They are good at what they do. Most are set up to be easily drained of the water that they have collected.
I can tell you that you should collect the numbers of the filters on the engine and order spares now. They will not be cheap, but not having them in the coach's kit will be an expensive mistake.
It seems that you do not have much service history on this coach. That be the case, change out all the filters now. Less that will cost money. If you wanted to save money, you should not have purchase an RV at all. A recliner and a bid screen TV would have been a lot less expensive.
After you get up off the floor when you are told the price of the complete filter set, and managed to carry them home, go on the web and find out where to get a better deal. You need to buy the first set locally so you know for an absolute fact where that they can be gotten on short notice.
You need to know how to replace all of them and how to bleed the fuel system to restart the main engine. This should all be in the engine manual. If you travel in a diesel anything, there is the chance that you will pick up a load of bad fuel.
What does this guy know?? Well I am a licensed ship's engineer (Chief stream or motor) and have been taking care of very expensive engines for a very long time. I have also owned five diesel road vehicles over that time. I have seen a lot of damage done by lack of attention.
Matt
Thanks for the info Matt and you made me laugh. Appreciate it!
 
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