Going to look at (our 1st) used TT on Saturday - Advice

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MicheleF

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Mar 3, 2013
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Toronto, Canada
We are taking the advice we have heard here repeatedly, and starting out with a used TT.  Our progression plan is TT towed by our 2006 Durango Hemi - then buy a 3/4 ton pickup when the Dodge dies, then buy a Fifth Wheel.

We have looked at probably two dozen trailers, but so far, haven't found what we want, at a price we want.  We're going on Saturday to look at a 1991 GLENDETTE  B260.  The ad reads:  Awning 26', Window Awning, Fridge with 2 doors,Heating, Coffee Table, Extra Door, Fully Furnished, Hide A Bed, Microwave, Spare with Carrier, Toilet Facilities, Television 19, 1 Televisions, Gas (dsi) Water Heater 6. 
**For a 1991 trailer this unit is in excellent condition. Just needs some TLC for many more hours to GO-RVing.**

The "needs some TLC" is a little worrisome, although my husband is extremely "handy" - as in he built our entire house, and most of the furniture in it - he's a master cabinetmaker by trade, but no longer has a full shop to work out of...

But I digress.

What kind of things should we be worrying out, looking out for - when we go to check this out.  We figure already new tires and new mattress, but what else?  Anything we should kick, poke, open, close, etc while we check it out?  Anything that would be a complete deal breaker?

Has anybody had any experience with the Glendette?  I haven't seen/heard this brand before.

Thanks -
Michele
 
MicheleF said:
Anything we should kick, poke, open, close, etc while we check it out?  Anything that would be a complete deal breaker?
Absolutely every thing you can.
Has anybody had any experience with the Glendette?  I haven't seen/heard this brand before.
IMHO brand name is meaningless. What is important is condition.
 
As stated...

Check everything you can! 

Especially check the ceiling even inside of cabinets and at the corners for any signs of leaks.  An ice pick is nice to have so you can "probe" and test areas for soft wood meaning rot.  Also check around all windows, doors, and opeings in the roof and walls.  Notice for any soft spots in the floor which would indicate a past leak and rotted wood.

Test all appliances.  Heater, water pump, lights etc.  Especially check the AC and the fridge.  Those two are the most expensive to repair/replace.  If possible have the seller turn the fridge on before you get there and have it cold.  These units can take up to 24 hours to get down to temp.

Even check the age of the battery and LP tanks.  The battery should be marked on top and if not may have a round sticker with a letter and number.  Number is year and letter is month in alpha order.  The LP tanks should have a date stamped on the top.  These can be negotiating items if they are nearing the end of life.

Roll out the awning and check it for condition and function.

 
Biggest concern at that age is water leaks and roof condition
 
MicheleF said:
We are taking the advice we have heard here repeatedly, and starting out with a used TT.  Our progression plan is TT towed by our 2006 Durango Hemi - then buy a 3/4 ton pickup when the Dodge dies, then buy a Fifth Wheel.

Since you're asking for advice, here's mine....buy the RV you really want to begin with.  Unless it's a financial decision, why go through the progession? 

Beyond that, buy the trailer in the best condition you can find with floorplan you like best.  Camping is a lot more fun than trying to rehab a trailer that "needs TLC".  From what you describe, your hubby is quite capable of fixing nearly anything on an RV, but why not give him a break from doing that stuff and buy a good unit to begin with?  There are a ton of RV's on the market.....a nice one probably isn't much more money than a ratty one.
 
BigDfromTN said:
As stated...

Check everything you can! 

Especially check the ceiling even inside of cabinets and at the corners for any signs of leaks.  An ice pick is nice to have so you can "probe" and test areas for soft wood meaning rot.  Also check around all windows, doors, and opeings in the roof and walls.  Notice for any soft spots in the floor which would indicate a past leak and rotted wood.

Test all appliances.  Heater, water pump, lights etc.  Especially check the AC and the fridge.  Those two are the most expensive to repair/replace.  If possible have the seller turn the fridge on before you get there and have it cold.  These units can take up to 24 hours to get down to temp.

Even check the age of the battery and LP tanks.  The battery should be marked on top and if not may have a round sticker with a letter and number.  Number is year and letter is month in alpha order.  The LP tanks should have a date stamped on the top.  These can be negotiating items if they are nearing the end of life.

Roll out the awning and check it for condition and function.
X2.....Great advice.
 
All great advice but I suggest to act as if you are camping in it with full hookups if possible.  Obviously, as stated, run fridge, a/c if it has it, heating, all outlests, but also run the sinks, toilet, check for leaks, and if at all possible, check the valves on the waste tanks.  One member said to check the roof, very important.  Lastly, put a load on the converter, i.e. hook up to shoe power if possible and run various electrical items and be sure breakers dont start flippin.  Good luck.
 
All of the above is good advice.  I won't repeat.  If the unit appears mechanically and structurally sound, floorplan would be the next determining factor for me.  In other words, if the family isn't comfortable in the unit when it's not so nice to be outside or in the evening, then you may find yourself wishing you would have kept looking.

It's a crap shoot.  Do the best you can and don't sign the dotted line too early.  Best of luck.
 
Hi first post in a while:

Be suspicious of air freshener smells. I think it's important to check the flooring under seats and in storage compartments. That's how I got burned once. Also check underbelly for cuts and repairs.

Lastly, there is a lot more supply than demand out there. Especially this time of year. Don't fall in love with any unit right off the bat. It'll probably still be there in a month. My neighbour's had his for sale for over a year. He's hardly got any calls.

Good luck!
 
Check the age of the tires.

http://www.safetyresearch.net/2011/09/19/tire-known-unknows-decoding-the-date/

 
I dont know how much they are asking or what your finances are, but a 91 is getting on as far as resale goes. The market for older trailers is not as strong as say one from the 2000s. If you are planning on only keeping it for a few years, one in the 10 year old range will be easier to sell. If you can find one at a good rate, you may even be able to recover most if not all your money on the resale if you take good care of it.  Definitly check for any leakage. Trailer are built out of toothpicks, and any water penetration means rot. Take a step ladder with you and check the roof condition. If it looks dirty and unmaintained , it probably needs attention. Typical leak spots are around vents and roof penetrations, as well as front and back corners. If it was parked with the front high, all the water would run off the back and vice versa. My first trailer had leaked in the rear corner, and the storage area at the back eventually turned into sawdust. Pretty hard to repair.
 
Don't buy the first one you find/see. Research!!! I know it is hard to not get the first thing you come across but sometimes this will lead to major disappointment. Our first TT we bought we came home to find the seller was not upfront on a lot of things including leaks. This turned out to be a MAJOR repair!!! We had to completely rip out everything in the master bedroom area and rebuild from scratch!! The newer RV the better. My recommendation is to not buy anything less than 10 years old (most roofs have this as their life expectancy) and the cost to have redone is a pretty penny (thousands)!!! Although a warranty is null and void if you buy used, this will give you a little extra breathing room.

Good Luck.

We bought our new unit off of Craigslist.
 
MicheleF said:
We are taking the advice we have heard here repeatedly, and starting out with a used TT.  Our progression plan is TT towed by our 2006 Durango Hemi - then buy a 3/4 ton pickup when the Dodge dies, then buy a Fifth Wheel...


...What kind of things should we be worrying out, looking out for - when we go to check this out.  We figure already new tires and new mattress, but what else?  Anything we should kick, poke, open, close, etc while we check it out?  Anything that would be a complete deal breaker?


From our Library, here is exactly what you are looking for:  CLICK HERE    I would add, be especially vigilant in looking for water damaged flooring soft spots in the bathroom  around the toilet.  Repairing that is a matter of replacing the water damage flooring (it will likely be particle board) and the toilet seal.  Tho your husband is a craftsman, it is a chore.  If you decide to cope with it, get some reduction in the price -- say $1000 or so.
 

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