Goodbye to hot summer RV'ing.

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SRGuy

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 9, 2021
Posts
127
Location
Austin, TX
As the world gets hotter and hotter, and I'm heading into old guy status, I'm feeling like my summer RV'ing is coming to an end. Even when I run my one 30A unit at night, at 75°F, by noon the next 100° day, it's 88°F inside. Add to that the condensation around the unit when the door is open for even a few seconds, and I'm getting to the end of this road, unfortunately. I have thought about getting a window unit for the bedroom, and adding an outside power cord to run it, but I'm not sure I even like doing anything outside when it's so hot, so why even tow my RV, anywhere, in the summer? We go to Colorado, take to the mountains, but it's still hitting 90° and higher, outside. I'll miss the constant challenges of the RV summer adventure, but I guess I can get enough of that when my target destinations have temps of 60°-75° in the spring and fall.

Anyone else getting to feel like summer RV'ing has lost its allure? I've been at it for about forty years.
 
I can sympathize, especially since you have only 30A and one a/c. We left the single a/c constraint behind back in 1994, realizing it was inadequate for RVing in the southern & mid USA except during the late fall and winter. By year 2000 we were firmly embarked on a sunbird itinerary, heading far north or into the mountains (preferably both) each summer.

As a long term residents of Florida (47 years now) we didn't mind low-80's at all, but when outdoor temps exceeded 85 and shade was lacking, we knew it was time to be elsewhere. Or maybe else-when.
 
Go up in elevation. It is hard to be terribly hot at 8000-9000’. Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, northern Arizona, Oregon, Washington - lovely places in the summer.
Walking the main street up on Cripple Creek, CO., elevation 9,000+, last year, we were the only people out and about. It was 91°F. Yeah, we'll try going further north, next summer.
 
Walking the main street up on Cripple Creek, CO., elevation 9,000+, last year, we were the only people out and about. It was 91°F. Yeah, we'll try going further north, next summer.
That may be true in the middle of the after noon, but I bet the low temp was in the 50s or low 60s and it didn't break 90 before noon, or much after 5PM or so. Even here in the Denver area (5200 ft) we rarely have a low over about 65º during the night. AND, humidity is usually (not quite always) under 30% on hotter days.

Still, we've seen it mid- and upper- 90s in Montana too.
 
One of the advantages of being retired and full time is that you can plan your travels so you do not have to travel with the masses of sweating hot people. Some of my favorite cool places are northern NM, northern CO, Canada, and the entire Pacific Northwest coast!!
 
Even if you can chill the RV interior to 68F there's more to RV'ing than sitting in the 225 square foot box you travel in at great expense. Just as snow birds flee northern climes in winter, we desert lizards flee north or to the mountains where there's other stuff going on than egg frying heat. RV or not when it's hundred out it's time to find a new place to hang out.

Mark B.
Albuquerque, NM
 
One of the advantages of being retired and full time is that you can plan your travels so you do not have to travel with the masses of sweating hot people. Some of my favorite cool places are northern NM, northern CO, Canada, and the entire Pacific Northwest coast!!
Yep, that's this year's RV escape plan. We live in Mariposa in the Yosemite foothills and while going up in elevation is an option, the Pacific is only a day's drive away and the temperature diff is 20+ degrees . . .
 
We’ve summered quite comfortably several years in northern MN, WI, and MI. Will be heading there again soon.
The headwaters of the Mississippi (outflow of Lake Itasca, MN) would be closer for you than the PNW or ID or MT and you can literally wade across the mighty Missipp. Here’s the 10 day forecasted temps.

IMG_0265.png
 
Grew up in Southern Wisconsin(just west of Madison), moved to Midland Tx in August 2013. Love the dry heat of the Permian Basin. Wifey didn’t care so much for Midland itself, so 3 years ago we moved straight east, to the western end of the ‘hill country’. Weather is a bit more humid, but not horrible like San Antonio or Houston.
 
I'm sitting at the Audubon State Historic Site in Louisiana right now. Day temps have been in the 90's for some time now, heat index over 102 often.

Every time I think the heat is getting to me, I'm quickly reminded about hundreds of enslaved people who use to work this plantation in the 1800's. They didn't have air conditioning and had to work in this brutal heat and humidity.

When I think of them, I don't feel quite so hot any more!
 
A couple of years ago, on Labor Day Weekend, I was visiting my son and his family in Napa, CA. Temps were at 108 during the day. He picked me up on Saturday and Sunday mornings, and I spent the days at his house with DIL and grandkids in their pool, while leaving rig plugged in at EXPO campground. On Sunday evening, I discovered that my AC was blowing only hot air. Spent that night at son's house but got up at 6 am, worrying about my rig and belongings baking in the heat. He drove me back, and I headed west, for the coast!

It was easily 25 degrees cooler on Highway 1, and since I had planned to head to Oregon on Tuesday, I headed north. Spent a wonderfully cool couple of nights in Eureka, CA on the coast, and had my AC checked out. Dead, so I stuck to the Oregon coast, and eventually got AC replaced. You can almost always plan on the Pacific Coast being cool even in hottest weather.
 
Yep, that's this year's RV escape plan. We live in Mariposa in the Yosemite foothills and while going up in elevation is an option, the Pacific is only a day's drive away and the temperature diff is 20+ degrees . . .
Looks like a great trip in one of my favorite parts of the country. I had to get medical treatment for a year in Eugene, OR, a few years back, and really got a chance to spend time in Washington and Oregon. If you have never been there, make sure you stop in the old town of Bandon, Oregon. Drive down through the arch to the harbor, turn left on the street along the harbor, and in a block or two, you will find a very handy dirt lot for RVs and other big vehicles. Just feet from shops and wooden art works along the harbor. Stop at the bakery to stock up on goodies and check out the nearby bookstore, then have some chowder or fish at one of the little shops along the harbor walk!!
 
Looks like a great trip in one of my favorite parts of the country. I had to get medical treatment for a year in Eugene, OR, a few years back, and really got a chance to spend time in Washington and Oregon. If you have never been there, make sure you stop in the old town of Bandon, Oregon. Drive down through the arch to the harbor, turn left on the street along the harbor, and in a block or two, you will find a very handy dirt lot for RVs and other big vehicles. Just feet from shops and wooden art works along the harbor. Stop at the bakery to stock up on goodies and check out the nearby bookstore, then have some chowder or fish at one of the little shops along the harbor walk!!
We were in the area during our 2019 RV trip. The gem we discovered was the Lucky Lodge RV Park near Gold Beach (We're staying there again in a few days.). Also, plenty of good eating . . . Spinner's in Gold Beach and Roseanna's in Oceanside.
 

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