Google Maps Go

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Gr8bawana

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 26, 2022
Posts
47
Location
Nevada
So this summer my wife and I took the 5th wheel on a journey through NV, ID and OR and we used Google Maps Go app quite a bit.
Sometimes the darn thing would tell us to make a turn that was obviously incorrect. We always tried to pre-plan our routes on an actual map before-hand.
A couple of times when we were not towing the trailer it took us on a road that would have been a nightmare if not downright dangerous had we been towing. As you know it's not easy finding someplace to turn around a 40' trailer.
Anyone else every have this problem?
 

phil-t

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 10, 2017
Posts
1,585
Location
Ogdensburg, NY
Just a question - why the google Maps Go app instead of Google Maps? We have had very few problems with Google Maps. Definitely need to review the routes though - it will route you like you are driving a car, not a 40 ft. RV.
 

Isaac-1

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 3, 2016
Posts
6,526
Location
SW Louisiana
Google maps assumes you are driving a car, and routes accordingly, if you want to take into account height and weight restrictions of an RV, you need an RV or commercial truck GPS or GPS App.
 

Skookum

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 19, 2018
Posts
1,492
It's good advice to double-check any GPS navigation route before blindly following directions, even if the device/program you are using is supposedly meant for large RV's or commercial vehicles. Even some of the routes those choose based on distance or time aren't good recommendations given much better alternative routes.
 
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Isaac-1

Well-known member
Joined
Dec 3, 2016
Posts
6,526
Location
SW Louisiana
I will agree with that, I have such a Garmin GPS, and at times it does crazy stuff, like wanting me to exit off a perfectly good interstate highway, drive on back highways for 3-4 miles then meet back up with the same interstate. Or take a clover leaf exit to the right which has not existed in 20+ years in a nearby city I often drive through when heading west on trips..
 

Pedro Dog

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Joined
Jul 9, 2022
Posts
764
Location
South Shores, CA
Just remember to have a true GPS unit to go with the cell phone Google Maps. Unless you preload the maps, if you loose cell service and turn off the guidance, Google maps won't know where you are. True GPS works as long as you have line of sight to the satellite.

We were on a trip south of Lake Tahoe around Markleeville, California and decided to do some exploring. Turned off the truck and Google maps while we hiked around. Got back in the truck and Google maps would not navigate without cell service. That truck didn't have a built in NAV and we were SOL for a while. Luckily we had old style paper maps and managed to find our way out.
 

Matt_C

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 4, 2019
Posts
809
Location
SE - Mich
Please read what Pedro wrote.
While we have always had a real GPS running, I run Google maps along with to know of interesting stops. Even preloading map data, we have still driven off the end of the earth a couple of times. Even the best of GPS are still stupid. They all have a fixation with highways. We don't. But, if you set the GPS to "Avoid Highways" they will want you to ford rushing streams and mountain passes to get you there.

Matt
 

PaulBates

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 15, 2022
Posts
223
Location
Dearborn, MI
Two things
- you can download maps into Google maps so no service is required. I'm in Michigans upper peninsula, where service can be spotty at best. I downloaded maps for the whole upper peninsula and have been able go point to point with no network. You do need a plan B and other maps or off-road app like GaiaGPS as a back up. As pointed out, you still need to scroll and look at the destination before just driving to make sure it's where you think.

- Google's knowledge of forest service and two tracks can be untrustworthy, yet it pulls no punches about using them as shortest route. Example.. there's a beautiful hike to rock river falls here in the UP... Down some lonely bumpy two tracks and forest service roads... Got us right there. Afterwards, we were going on to Marquette to the west... It asked us to continue on the forest road... And in less than half a mile... Big pile of dirt across the road so I didn't drive on a bridge that wasn't there. We had plenty of time and back-tracking was plan b.
The point is the further from urban settings and major highways you get, the more you need to grade Google's homework, no trips longer than you're prepared to reverse course out of
 

UTTransplant

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 20, 2014
Posts
3,499
Location
Cedar Falls, IA
I highly recommend a dedicated RV GPS. We have a Garmin 890, but they come at many price points depending on the features you want and display size. Yes, any GPS can take you down the wrong roads due to bad base maps (almost always the fault of the government entity that produced them!), but you will get better guidance with a unit that knows your height, weight, and length. If in doubt, check your route with a paper trucker’s atlas.
 
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tomcom01

Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2022
Posts
7
Location
Long Island
Does anyone know if these Garmin RV GPS are compatible with Apple Car Play, for example can I link it to my phone and have it display on my trucks screen ?
 

Octodad

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 8, 2022
Posts
134
Location
Augusta, KS
I'm not familiar with Google Maps Go, but have had more than my share of bad experience relying on plain Google Maps, even in just a car. My experience tells me that if you aren't in a hurry and want to see the backroads, just type in start and end points and let Google Maps send you where it will. Otherwise, spend some time planning the route ahead of schedule. Safe travels.
 

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