Gunpowder, treason and plot

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Tom

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Anyone visiting, RVing or living in the UK on November 5th will be very aware of the saying:

Remember, remember, the 5th of November, gunpowder, treason and plot.

Guy planned to blow up the houses of parliament at the time of the visit of the King. He was caught before the dastardly deed could be carried out. You can read this version of the story. After dark, Brits will be lighting fireworks and bonfires with effagies of Guy to commemorate this notable date.

When I was a kid we'd make a guy using old clothes stuffed with newspaper and straw and we'd haul it around the houses, knock on the doors and say "penny for the guy". Most folks would dig in their pockets and find some loose change which we'd use to buy fireworks.
 

Ian H

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Bit of a damp squib i'me afraid Tom its pouring down across most of the UK
and i think penny for the guy is dying out,it seems to be overtaken by Halloween which is getting very
Americanised over here
 

Tom

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Hi Ian. I figured you'd pick up on my message. We used to do Halloween in addition to penny for the guy when I was a kid - it was called (in Welsh) "nos cyn gauau", if I haven't forgotten the spelling. Translates to "night before winter".
 

Carl L

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Ian H said:
Bit of a damp squib i'me afraid Tom its pouring down across most of the UK
and i think penny for the guy is dying out,it seems to be overtaken by Halloween which is getting very
Americanised over here

Not at all.  You will know you are getting Americanized when you all start seeing 4th of July decorations.  ;D
 

Tom

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Carl Lundquist said:
You will know you are getting Americanized when you all start seeing 4th of July decorations.

Carl, reminds me of a UK friend who was asked by his stateside colleagues if they celebrate Thanksgiving in the UK. He asked what Thanksgiving was all about and, after hearing the story, said "no, we celebrate the day they left Plymouth".
 

Carl L

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Thanksgiving is really unique to us and the Canadians.  Some Glaswegian friends we had from the UK Current Affairs forum joined us  for a Thanksgiving some years back.  She had always wanted to do the US thing and I told her old man, what the hell come on over for one with us.  The marginal cost of 2 extra mouths at the feast is minimal.  We did the whole nine yards:  turk, stuffing, sweet taters,  string beans cassarole, punkin pie, and several bottles of chardonnay and cabernet sauvignon.  This was followed up with turkey divan, turkey sandwiches,  turkey a la King, etc. etc..

We also followed up with an RV and hotelling trip to Palm Canyon Resort and bombing around Anza Borrego Desert State Park.  This was like the far side of the moon for west coast Scots.
 

Tom

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Carl Lundquist said:
Thanksgiving is really unique to us and the Canadians.

Well, of course. The Australians had nothing to celebrate since they were shipped there as prisoners. As for the Brits who stayed at home, well they obviously didn't leave, so they never arrived in their new land.
 

Ian H

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i will celebrate anything as long as it is made into a bank holiday,and as for turkey i am waiting for them to hit the supermarkets then i can try out the turkey frier we brought over with us complete with peanut oil
 

Tom

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Ian H said:
i can try out the turkey frier we brought over with us complete with peanut oil

Ian, did you find a 240V turkey frier, or will you use the coach generator, or a transformer?
 

Tom

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Ron said:
Most likely their turky frier is propane similar to ours.

Ah, I was thinking electric. That raises the question whether the threads on the propane adapter would fit.
 

Ron

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Tom said:
Ah, I was thinking electric. That raises the question whether the threads on the propane adapter would fit.
Chances are they will.  We bought a gas grill in Australia and had no problem when we connected a tank to it here in the US.  That is the big one you might have seen at Sam's Camp.
 

Tom

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Ron said:
Chances are they will.

Ron, do you know if our gas connections are metric by any chance? I suspect, but don't know for sure, that UK threads might be metric. I had no use for my UK-owned metric wrenches when we first came to the U.S. 25 years ago, so I left them behind. Meanwhile, change has been very slow to come. I'm about to learn two new pieces of information.
 

Ron

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I am not sure Tom.  I do know that Australia are on the metric system so since I had no problem using my Aussie grill here without modification maybe the propane connections are metric.  Guess I will ask next time we are near a propane place.
 

Tom

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Didn't our connectors change a year or two ago with the introduction of the new OPDs? I seem to recall they went from left hand to right hand threads (?) although I think they were somehow made backwards compatible. Or was that merely the connection to the tank itself?
 

blueblood

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Tom said:
Didn't our connectors change a year or two ago with the introduction of the new OPDs? I seem to recall they went from left hand to right hand threads (?) although I think they were somehow made backwards compatible. Or was that merely the connection to the tank itself?

The new green handle (right hand thread) easy on/off  is a Type 1 Acme thread which comes on the hose to connect to tank for US units. I don't know if UK would supply a ASTME Acme thread ?
 

Ron

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The our Aussie grill has the old style left hand threads which I am using on a tank with the new style OPD valve.  They are backward compatible.
 

Carl L

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Is that a fact !!! ..lol.. you might be surprised where we Scots travel to..

Not at all.  As I said we had visited them in Glasgow.  Lovely town and marvellous people, but the weather....Oi vey!    Any rate, the landscape is nothing like the Anza Borrego desert -- especially on the 4-wheel trails in the back country.  ABD gets less rain in a year than Glasgow gets in a week.

By the bye, traveling Scots seem to be fairly rare on the ground out here in the Wild West.  In fact, traveling old country Brits seem to be rare on the ground in general.  Germans on the other hand are legion.  I rarely stay in a campground near a senic attraction that does not have a 2 or 3 German parties in an RV. 

You all ought to get out west a bit more.  It is nothing like Old Blighty.  Even the areas that are as damp as Britain, the Northwest, have forests and volcanos.  :)
 

Tom

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LOL Carl, I think you've been spending too much time on that Brit forum again. Any truth to the rumor that they call you the Sheriff of Nottingham (as in the days of Robin Hood)?
 

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