Hardwire permanent extension cord

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

Hewster

Active member
Joined
Jan 22, 2022
Posts
32
Location
BC, Canada
Ongoing with my spring plans I’m wanting to run permanent wiring to my mounted inverter. It does not have external hardwire connections.

I’m pondering 2 options:

1) running the extension cord (HD, it has 10 gauge wire) from inverter to transfer switch with a male plug on one end and hardwired to transfer switch on the other.

2) opening up inverter, modify connection to allow me to “hardwire” the cord internally of the inverter.

Notes:

1) yes, converter will be wired to not allow it to be powered by inverter, only shore/generator power.

2) this is equipment I already have and works flawlessly for me so I’m making it work with what I have while keeping it accessible for upgrades in the future. IF this inverter fails on me I will be upgrading to a 2000w pure sine (from 1000w pure sine) and at that time will either go inverter/charger or just inverter. I have 2/0 cable run to the inverter.
 

Lou Schneider

Site Team
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
11,711
There's no advantage to opening up and hardwiring to a 1000 watt inverter. It's maximum output is well within the rating of a single 15 amp plug (1800 watts). A 2000 watt inverter is likewise well within the capacity of a 20 amp plug (2400 watts) so even there you'd gain little or nothing by hard wiring it.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Posts
75,890
Location
Looking to buy a new home
Agree with Lou & Jay. Use the male plug into the inverter outlet. Your only concern will be trying to fit 10 gauge onto a 15A male plug. Why are you using a 10 ga cord for a 1000W (8.5A) load? 14 ga is plenty and will even handle a bigger inverter (up to 1800 watts) in the future.
 

Hewster

Active member
Joined
Jan 22, 2022
Posts
32
Location
BC, Canada
Agree with Lou & Jay. Use the male plug into the inverter outlet. Your only concern will be trying to fit 10 gauge onto a 15A male plug. Why are you using a 10 ga cord for a 1000W (8.5A) load? 14 ga is plenty and will even handle a bigger inverter (up to 1800 watts) in the future.
Thanks for the input everyone.

I’m using it 1) because I have it and never use it for anything else. Haha

2) just in case I decided to up from that 2000 to 3000watts.

Over do it now and I only ever have to do it once.
 

Lou Schneider

Site Team
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
11,711
If you upgrade to 3000 watts you'll have to hard wire to the inverter, so why worry about that now?
 
Top Bottom