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cajama15

Member
Joined
May 24, 2006
Posts
9
Hello, My name is Monti. We are from Florida and it?s hot!!  :p My wife and I are selling our home and joining the ranks of full-timers. We hope!!  :-\

Right now all we have is our tow vehicle which is a 2005 Dodge 3500 SLT 4x4 Dually with a 5.9 Cummins Diesel and a 4.10 gear ratio. 4-Speed automatic. From everything I?ve read in the forums I guess all those things are important to know!!  :)

Anyway, since we are obviously pure rookies at this stuff, I hope we don?t become a nuisance with all the questions we will be asking.  ???

We have been looking at the Cedar Creek 36RLTS and it seems to be the one my wife likes the best. And if she?s happy?. I?m happy!!  ;D

Any guidance or information you can give us, no matter how small, would be extremely appreciated.

Thanks, Monti
 

Jim Dick

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Feb 11, 2005
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Titusville, FL
Hi Monti,

Welcome to the forum. Asking questions is what keeps this forum going. There will be plenty of people here to answer them. We are also from Florida and have been full timing for almost 10 years.
 

Tom

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Jan 13, 2005
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Let me add my welcome to Jim's. In addition to asking questions, please feel free to check out our library for articles that might be useful. Just click the Library button above and select one of the categories.
 

Carl L

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Mar 14, 2005
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7,239
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west Los Angeles
OK, what we seem to have here is a truck with a tow rating of 15,500 lbs. per Trailer Lifes 2005 tables.  If you plan to tow only in the east, you should get a trailer with a gross vehicle weight rating of less than 13,950 lbs (10% safety factor).  If you ever plan to tow in the mountain or Pacific coast west, drop that GVWR to 12,400 lbs to allow for 7-8,000 foot altitudes and 20 mile long 6% grades.

So what what is the GVWR of the trailer of your hearts' desire?  You can find the number on the DOT plate on the trailer's left front side.

 

Wendy

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Colorado
Hi Monti,

My husband, Mike, and I are also in the process of selling off all our stuff so we can go full-timing. Hubby is on the roof of the motorhome right now installing solar panels so we can boondock often.

Lots of great info here, technical, travel, and otherwise. Ask questions....the folks here love to answer all kinds of queries.

So qelcome to the group and enjoy!!

 

cajama15

Member
Joined
May 24, 2006
Posts
9
Carl Lundquist said:
OK, what we seem to have here is a truck with a tow rating of 15,500 lbs. per Trailer Lifes 2005 tables.? If you plan to tow only in the east, you should get a trailer with a gross vehicle weight rating of less than 13,950 lbs (10% safety factor).? ?If you ever plan to tow in the mountain or Pacific coast west, drop that GVWR to 12,400 lbs to allow for 7-8,000 foot altitudes and 20 mile long 6% grades.

So what what is the GVWR of the trailer of your hearts' desire?? ?You can find the number on the DOT plate on the trailer's left front side.


[/So what what is the GVWR of the trailer of your hearts' desire?  You can find the number on the DOT plate on the trailer's left front side.]
 

cajama15

Member
Joined
May 24, 2006
Posts
9
;D I have no idea what just happened. Sorry about that!!! According to the brochure the Unloaded Vehicle Weight is 11480 and the GVWR is 13870.
I hope this is going to be ok!!! :eek:
 

Tom

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Posts
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cajama15 said:
I have no idea what just happened.

It's easy to click the Quote button instead of the Reply button because they're adjacent to each other. I often click the wrong button.
 

cajama15

Member
Joined
May 24, 2006
Posts
9
Tom, Thanks it's good to know about the quote and reply buttons. For a moment there, I was thinking "how could I become a full-timer when I can't even post a reply". ;D

The next thing is, do I choose the different topic areas to ask the specific questions I have or, can I keep the asking questions and replying in this topic area?
For example: My reply to the GVWR of the Cedar Creek.

That might have been a dumb question but I don't want to impose in the wrong area.

Monti
 

Shayne

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Jan 22, 2006
Posts
4,324
Monti-  Don't worry about  I make so many mistakes, no one will even see yours and if they do,  they'll help you along.    Been there done that, and off again.  Just participlate.
 

Tom

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cajama15 said:
.... do I choose the different topic areas to ask the specific questions I have or, can I keep the asking questions and replying in this topic area?

Monti,

Generally it's best to start a new topic if it's a different subject. The reasons for this are:

  • Many folks reading the forum scan the topics for something that interests them and skip everything else. So if, for example, a question in air bags was buried in a topic on refreidgerators, it won't be seen by these folks and you'd be missing potential responders.
  • Someone coming along at a later date looking for information in existing topics woudn't think of looking for it in a topic on an unrelated subject.

Having said that, there's nothing "wrong" with several questions on a related subject being posted in the same topic.
 

Carl L

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Posts
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Location
west Los Angeles
cajama15 said:
;D I have no idea what just happened. Sorry about that!!! According to the brochure the Unloaded Vehicle Weight is 11480 and the GVWR is 13870.
I hope this is going to be ok!!! :eek:

Just to try something a bit different, let's deal with the original question.  ;D

A GVWR of 13870 lbs is 89.5% of a tow rating of 15,500 lbs.  In my opinion that is fine for the flats of Florida or Illinios.  However, if you ever intend to schlepp that trailer over the San Rafeal Swell on I-70 in Utah, Lookout Pass on I-90, or try get into San Diego on the I-8, or any of those other grades and passes listed in the Mountain Directory -- Western Edition, then you want to lose about 1500 lbs of trailer weight.  Check out the next size model on down.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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At our Silver Springs FL home
Normally I would agree with Carl's suggested 15-20% head room for western region towing, but the big diesel pick-ups are all awesome haulers and I think you can manage OK from that perspective.  At worst, you will occasionally slow down more than you would like on an uphill grade, but that's not a big deal. We hauled a heavy fifth wheel all over the West when we had a trailer, pulling a load right at the GCWR limit (21,000 at  that time) with the Ford Superduty diesel we then had. It climbed every mountain with aplomb.

Downhills are a larger concern, though.  You are talking about a lot of weight to brake and electric trailer brakes usually aren't as effective as those on the truck or a passenger car.  [Some trailers now have electirc/hydraulic disc brakes, which are said to be better).  A exhaust brake on the Dodge would be a big plus. For awhile Dodge was prohibiting exhaust brakes on theire diesel automatics because it was causing premature failure on the transmissions. Check with a Dodge dealer to see if this restriction applies to your 2005 3500. If not, I highly recommend adding an exhaust brake for the size loads you will be hauling.
 

joelmyer

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Mar 5, 2005
Posts
1,058
Location
Georgia
It's like the man said about climbing Mt Everest: Most anybody in decent condition can get up; the trick is getting down alive.

I have the 2004 Dodge Cummins 6 speed manual and added the exhaust brake.  I wouldn't go west of the Mississippi (or some places in the east) without it!

Like Gary & Carl said - look at a smaller trailer and see if you can get an exhaust brake.

Joel
 

cajama15

Member
Joined
May 24, 2006
Posts
9
:)Boy Gary, I thought you got me out of the dog house I was in from telling my wife she couldn't have her trailer (36RLTS) because it was too big!! :mad:

Now with Joel's reply I'm a tad bit confused.  ???  Easily Done!!!  ;D

Were you saying that our Dodge could handle the job and to look into getting an exhause brake for the ride down hill or were also advising me to look at a smaller trailer?
Qoute: [Like Gary & Carl said - look at a smaller trailer and see if you can get an exhaust brake]

I need to know where I'm sleeping tonight!  ;)


Thanks Monti

 

Jim Dick

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Feb 11, 2005
Posts
7,651
Location
Titusville, FL
Hi Monti,

I think what has been said is you are at the limit of towing with the trailer but it can be done. The problem is coming down the other side of the mountain. You need to investigate whether or not you can add an exhaust brake. This will help tremendously with the downhill side of your travels.
 

Carl L

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Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
7,239
Location
west Los Angeles
cajama15 said:
:)Boy Gary, I thought you got me out of the dog house I was in from telling my wife she couldn't have her trailer (36RLTS) because it was too big!! :mad:

Now with Joel's reply I'm a tad bit confused.? ???? Easily Done!!!? ;D

Were you saying that our Dodge could handle the job and to look into getting an exhause brake for the ride down hill or were also advising me to look at a smaller trailer?
Qoute: [Like Gary & Carl said - look at a smaller trailer and see if you can get an exhaust brake]

I need to know where I'm sleeping tonight!? ;)


Thanks Monti


1.? Don't take the heat yourself.? ?Show her this topic and let her make up her own mind.? She should remember that she may well have to drive the thing herself.? ?There are a number of old timer trailer hauler here giving advice.

2.? I am not going to argue about diesel torque characteristics.? ?Just remember every hill has another side.? Tow capacity is a matter of engine, transmission and brakes.? I have a gas engine, a short block Ford V8.? When I take my foot off the throttle, my rig immediately starts slowing.? ?If I am heading down a? 6% grade, I down shift into 2nd to increase my engine brake and the rig slows.? With proper gearing, I can descend completely under control only occasionally touching my brakes.? ?If that little Ford V8 were a diesel, no amount of downshifting is going to help on a descent.? ?On a 6% 20 miles down grade, I would be riding my brakes all the way down.? Those brakes are going to get hot.? ?As Martha Stewart says, hot brakes are NOT a good thing.

Diesels need add on exhaust brakes to get engine braking on a downhill run.? Even with such, you are stretching things a bit with your current choice.? ?Look around a bit more at slightly smaller units, you both may be happier with the results.
 

cajama15

Member
Joined
May 24, 2006
Posts
9
Thanks everyone for your advice. I've got some work convincing the Mrs. about a different model but as you say Carl, she might have to drive it as well and I don't want to find ourselves in stickiy situation.  :eek:
Since we live in Florida and most of the family we will be visiting is on the East coast, we might not run into quite as long or as steep a decline as out West, but we do want to go out that way and see the sights at least once. Who knows, we might like it so much we'll keep going back, OR, maybe I can lighten the load by leaving the DW out there!! :-\
Speaking of Florida, Jim what part are you from? We are about an hour North of Tampa on the coast.
Thanks again, Monti


 
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