Help with BBQ

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pauline

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Apr 6, 2006
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I am going to buy a BBQ but I don't want to spend a lot of money but I would like something that will work for a few years.?

How do I BBQ without burning or undercooking the food?

Are there recipes on the forum?

Any hints are greatly appreciated.? Pauline
 

PancakeBill

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If electric, my wife just bought a nice slow cooking unit.  Put ribs in, 7 hours later they melt in your mouth.

For smoker style, there are charcoal, gas and electric available, and for gas, tons.  Size?  I have a nice Stainless steel portable we bought.  propane, works good.

 

Jeff

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We purcased an all stainless steel portable at Lowe's last summer that we really enjoy using for about $100.00.
 

John From Detroit

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Well... When it comes to BBQ there are purists who are going to tell you it's coal or nothing, Propane and electric just don't taste right.

I'm not one of them, I'm just passing on the message.  I use propane and electric

I have an electric "Indoor/Outdoor" grill packed here in my storage building which will find it's way into the MH

I also use a Coleman (tm) Grill that folds down nicely and packs in the bay, it's a two burner  propane job and can be run off a small disposable, or with the proper adapters off a big bottle or off the house propane tank

I use stand alone "Side burners" (easier to pack that way)

Basically decide how many you are cooking for and get the proper size unit.  If you plan on hosting a lot of large parteis then the big, stainless steel, kilo-buck ($1,000) plus units may well make sense

If it's just the two of you a "Grill to Go" Or equivlent may well be good,  I like the one I have
 

Betty Brewer

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pauline said:
I am going to buy a BBQ but I don't want to spend a lot of money but I would like something that will work for a few years.?How do I BBQ without burning or undercooking the food?

Pauline,

My husband does most of the bar b queing and he has purchased several of them looking for the perfect one.  Look for one with lots of BTU's.  This way you can get nice high heat to sear the meat.  As far as over or under cooking the BBQ usually comes with a  cookbook with recommended cooking times for various thickness' of meat.  In addition Terry purchased a probe with a thermometer that beeps when his meat is at the desired level of doneness.  We use propane as it heats up more quickly than fooling with charcoal. Consider storage of your BBQ in the purchase factor. Have fun.

Betty
 

Kenneth

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Nov 21, 2005
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BBQ is an art form that can only be mastered by repetition? ;D

This is what usually takes place ;

After the long months of cold and winter, we will soon be coming up to summer and BBQ season. Therefore it is important to refresh your memory on the etiquette of this sublime outdoor cooking as it's the only type of cooking a real man will do, probably because there is an element of danger involved.

When a man volunteers to do the BBQ the following chain of events are put into motion:

Routine...

1) The woman buys the food.
2) The woman makes the salad, prepares the vegetables, and makes dessert.
3) The woman prepares the meat for cooking, places it on a tray along with the necessary cooking utensils and sauces, and takes it to the man who is lounging beside the grill - beer in hand.

Here comes the important part:

4) THE MAN PLACES THE MEAT ON THE GRILL.

More routine....

5) The woman goes inside to organize the plates and cutlery.
6) The woman comes out to tell the man that the meat is burning. He thanks her and asks if she will bring another beer while he deals with the situation.


Important again:

7) THE MAN TAKES THE MEAT OFF THE GRILL AND HANDS IT TO THE WOMAN.


More routine.....

8) The woman prepares the plates, salad, bread, utensils, napkins,
sauces and brings them to the table.
9) After eating, the woman clears the table and does the dishes.

And most important of all:

10) Everyone PRAISES the MAN and THANKS HIM for his cooking efforts.

11) The man asks the woman how she enjoyed "her night off." And, upon seeing her annoyed reaction, concludes that there's just no pleasing some women....?


 

Karl

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My preference is hardwood charcoal or, in a pinch, charcoal briquettes. Gives a flavor that can't be matched by gas or electric. Mine is a rectangular Sunbeam, about 18"x12" that comes apart for compact storage and a piece of amuminum foil in the bottom makes cleanup a snap. Like regular cooking, start with the longest cooking time items first such as potatoes and corn, then add the faster cooking items as you go.

Judging beef doneness is fairly simple with the use of a pair of serving tongs. Press the meat in several places with the edge of the tongs.

If it "Moo's" back, it's really rare.
If it exudes red juice and feels soft, it's rare.
If it exudes pink juice but is still soft, it's medium rare.
If it exudes pink juice and feels a little firm, it's medium.
If it exudes clear juice and feels firm, it's medium well.
If it exudes little or no juice and feels like shoe leather, it's well done. This piece of meat can be left cookng until completely black; then thrown in the bag with the rest of the charcoal for later use. ;D

IMHO pork and chicken should always be cooked thoroughly for health reasons. Best to use a meat thermometer for these. Fish is done when it flakes easily with a fork. 

Edited to add 'medium rare'.
 

PancakeBill

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I am curious as to whether the original question related to BBQ as in the generic term, meaning some type of grill, OR one designed to cook BBQ the great southern dish.  This is a slow cooked treat, best enjoyed from a roadside temp stand your mother wouldn't let you stop at.  Just realize it is hot, it is spicey, germs can't live in hot and spicey.  Stop, buy, eat enjoy. 

That kind of BBQ uses a specific type of unit to cook. 

Would you repeat the question?
 

Just Lou

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Dec 25, 2005
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BBQ in the down east part of the "Old North State" is very specifically slow cooked (smoked) pork with a vinegar and cracked Red Pepper sauce.? Don't mess with a good thing.
You can cheat and use propane if the propane is only used to provide indirect heat and to burn the hickory or applewood chips to make the smoke.? Purists use hardwood (not coal, John). Takes about eight hours at 200 degrees.? I have smokers that can handle anything from a complete 100 lb pig down to a picnic shoulder or a slab 'o ribs.? They use wood, charcoal and/or propane.?
Don't ever get a tomato based sauce or a piece of Beef near my smokers.? lol

I do often smear a Memphis or Kansas City style sauce on my ribs and give them a good sear just before they come off the grill.
 

Carl L

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pauline said:
I am going to buy a BBQ but I don't want to spend a lot of money but I would like something that will work for a few years.?

How do I BBQ without burning or undercooking the food?

Are there recipes on the forum?

Any hints are greatly appreciated.? Pauline

I will assume you are in some sort of RV and want something cheap and which will pack easily.  In that case I recommend keeping things simple -- a small charcoal grill.  Specifically the sort of small unit that has a cover and has a pair of wire legs that snap over the cover for transportation.    The unit is compact, and can be transported in a storage unit on most any RV with no problems.

In operation, you take the cover off, the cooking griil off, and build a small pile of charcoal brickettes on the bottom grate.  Light the pile.  When the coals are fully engaged, covered with white ash, spread the pile, and put the cooking grill back on, and put the meat on the grill.

Use a lot of coal if you are going to cook something that is big (couple of steaks) or long cooking (chicken).  Cover if you want more heat. 
Adjust the heat of the fire using the little dampers on the bottom:  wide open -- hot, not so wide open -- cool.

 

pauline

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Apr 6, 2006
Posts
7
Thanks for the great replies.

I actually am at home and I was wanting to buy a BBQ for the back deck.? I am not sure if Propane or charchoal is the way to go and I do not want to spend a lot of money.

I have no idea how to cook on one and I don't want to spend all this money just to burn the food because I can do that without spending the money.? ?:D

Is charcoal only used once? Or several times?

Does anyone have a secret sauce they wouldn't mind sharing?? Pauline
 

Carl L

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pauline said:
Thanks for the great replies.

I actually am at home and I was wanting to buy a BBQ for the back deck.  I am not sure if Propane or charchoal is the way to go and I do not want to spend a lot of money.

I have no idea how to cook on one and I don't want to spend all this money just to burn the food because I can do that without spending the money.  :D

Is charcoal only used once? Or several times?

Does anyone have a secret sauce they wouldn't mind sharing?  Pauline

Ah, that is a bit different.  OK, I like gas -- in fact since I have natural gas heating in the house, I have a natural gas BBQ.  Propane works just fine too and does not require piping.    Charcoal is the cheapest way to go tho.  You can buy a perfectly  adequate sheet metal Weber style unit for $50 or so, depending on your shopping.    A propane or natural gas unit will weigh in at over $100, some units, waaaaay over $100. 

Charcoal burns -- just once I am afraid.  It leaves ashes to dump the next morning.  Temperature adjustment is a matter of experience.

Grilling, which is what we are talking about, is simple and you are wise to keep it simple.  Throw a piece of meat on the barby and come back when it is done.  You can add wood chips to give it a smoke flavoring.  Sauces are best reserved for the last 20 minutes of cooking to avoid covering the meat with a carbonized crust of yuk.  I like Stubbs sauces but there are any number of decent sausces on the market...experiment to see what you like.

Steaks should be about 1" think or more for grilling.  Poultry should be cooked bone in, skin on.  The skin fat is rendered away in the cooking.   

Get a meat thermo, the small dial kind or an electronic.  Cook by internal temperature not time.  Poultry is done to 175 F.  Other meats as appropriate.

More if you wish.
 

Karl

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Carl,
Sauces are best reserved for the last 20 minutes of cooking to avoid covering the meat with a carbonized crust of yuk.

Couldn't agree more. Too often, people will dunk the meat in sauce and then throw it on the barbie. Result - Black crust and undercooked meat. If you want, marinate the meat in the sauce for a few hours or more, then clean it off before cooking. You can always smear it back on towards the end.
 

pauline

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Apr 6, 2006
Posts
7
I saw a nice BBQ with 45 000 BTU's.?

Would this be one with good temperature control?? Pauline
 

Carl L

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pauline said:
I saw a nice BBQ with 45 000 BTU's.?

Would this be one with good temperature control?? Pauline

Dunno.? Frankly temperature control is not a major issue with grilling.? ?Remember the cooking is done over a naked combustion source (charcoal) or almost incandescent rocks (gas).*? ?Temperature is controlled on charcoal by raising or lowering the grill or by a valve on the gas units or by covering the grill both with charcoal and gas units? ?Cooking is judged either by touch with beefsteaks, or by internal temperature tested by an inserted thermometer.? You can even cheat and make a small incision with a sharp knife to see how you are doing -- but that is considered bush league so do it when no one is watching.? ?;D

A barby that has? a cover that can be used during cooking is very desirable.? ?I give you a recipe to demonstrate.

Get a split turkey breast, skin on, bones in.? ?Make a shallow pan out of aluminum foil, doubled over shiny side outward,? roughly the shape and slightly larger than the meat.? ?Place the meat in the pan and place both on the barby over low heat.? ?Cover the barby.? ?Cook til the meat is about 160-165 as measured.? ?Remove and carve in about 15 minutes.? ?You can also put a handfull of hickory chips on the fire before covering to give the bird a nice smoke flavor.

Note the simplicity of the recipe.  Place meat on fire.  Wait.  Take temperature.  When hot enough take meat off fire.    Caveman cooking.  Works just fine.

[* Some gas barbeques come with metal plates instead of rocks.  I suppose they have some appeal, but, frankly, after buying a portable version of such -- never again. ]
 

PancakeBill

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I have one I like for the deck.  If you don't need a lot of cooking space, (good for serving 4), It is called Patio Grill.  About a 20" round with cover.  Uses lava rock to disperse heat.  Mine is propane, but have seen the same style with electric, and I think also charcoal.  Been my favorite over the years and many units I have owned.  Has wheels for moving about, comes with a 13 lb tank.  However, it will hold a 20# tank.  Nice part about this is that I use the small tank with RV, leave the 20 on the grill.  The cool part was that to get a 13# tank it would cost about $65, a 20 was about $19. 

These seem to retail at about $139.  I bought mine about 8 years ago.  Whhile I have a certain lust for the big SS units with side burners, I have no use for them at all.  We just don't need that much cooking space. 

 

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