How Do Gas Prices, Ukraine War, North Korea and Current Items Effect your RV Travel

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Viajeros

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Seeing it’s almost impossible to name anything not affected by the price of oil, including the electricity to charge your $10,000 tow vehicle battery, there’s a huge affect
Meh. We are in BC. Hydro power is pretty cheap here. But I hear ya.
 

PaulBates

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Sep 15, 2022
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Dearborn, MI
t!! The only thing I question is what do you consider a "midsize R/V? The smallest T.T. I ever owned ( have owned 7 Class c's, T.T's and 5 the wheels) was an 28' no slide Jayco T.T. which I towed with a 1/2 ton P.U. Even that small (was WAY too small for us) I'd have to crawl about 40 M.P.H. to average 13-15 mpg!! Just curious.
I've thrown the term out to loosely.... I drive a 4th gen Ford escape which is a compact SUV. Our model is simplicity... A small popup for 2, and the pop up needs to be towed by my daily driver. I've chosen not to buy a truck or self powered RV.

I've used trip odometer 2 to track average mpg for 2 years prior to towing, just over 30mpg.
 

DonTom

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Auburn, CA or Reno, NV
We are in BC. Hydro power is pretty cheap here.
Varies a lot more than gasoline here in the USA.

100 miles /160KM away at my house in Reno, NV electricity costs 0.1105 (11.05 cents) per KWH. Here in Auburn, CA it costs 0.2720 (27.2) cents per KWH. Almost three times. Water is worse. If I use none at all, it's more than a hundred bucks per month (just to be connected to the service).

But as we know, CA is no place for poor people--except for the homeless! ;)

I see gasoline is cheap here at $6.50 compared to just north of the Golden Gate where they are now around $7.00 bucks for regular:

mv7.jpg

-Don- Auburn, CA
 

Viajeros

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Food, groceries, clothing, lumber, everything is hauled by trucks, trains,airplanes…everything, all run on petroleum.
Yep. All true. I think the gest of the thread was directed more at fuel costs of the RV or tow vehicle.
 

Viajeros

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I understand and agree but the high cost of fuel affects everything leaving less for travel of any kind….life in general
Yah. Isn’t that the truth. Hang in there brother. We still have it pretty good on this side of the pond wether that be your country or mine. Let’s hope they get this thing sorted out on the other side of the world before it becomes an extinction level event.

Safe travels.
 

camperAL

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Indiana
The idea of my question, is are you concern not only with gas prices but some possible dangers overseas. It is still possible to travel with $4,$5 and $6 dollar gas. The more distance you travel the higher the cost.

In 2020 my cost for round trip from Indiana to Tucson area was $1,100. Today that is closer to
double that.

Someone pointed out they weren't going to travel to those spots but if war breaks out your going to be making hugh detours around the hot spots where the nukes have went off in this country. BTW by the time you circumnavigate the hole in the ground, your dead from radiation. While I think the chance of this happening is some what low, I think it is higher than it has been.
 

Pedro Dog

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South Shores, CA
In 2020 my cost for round trip from Indiana to Tucson area was $1,100. Today that is closer to
double that.

Yes, but if you stay in Indiana, how much will you have to spend to keep warm? I bet you are still ahead traveling to Tucson.

And where will you have a better time?
 

camperAL

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Hi Pedro Dog,

LP is going up and might cost us $400 to $500 extra this winter. So that can be applied to our gas rather than LP at home. If we turn down the heat in the house it might totally pay for the extra cost of gas.

Your right more fun in Arizona than looking out at snow in the yard.
 

UTTransplant

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Cedar Falls, IA
Someone pointed out they weren't going to travel to those spots but if war breaks out your going to be making hugh detours around the hot spots where the nukes have went off in this country. BTW by the time you circumnavigate the hole in the ground, your dead from radiation. While I think the chance of this happening is some what low, I think it is higher than it has been.
For many, many years I lived in a lower first tier nuclear strike target/top second tier target - Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Yup. Iowa. Turns out it used to be the backup hub for the US nuclear communication system due to the old Collins Radio Company (which morphed into Rockwell Collins which is now a combination of Raytheon and BAE, but I digress). There really are no contingency plans an individual can make under those circumstances. It also isn’t a thing I worry about. I am much, much, much more likely to get his crossing the street.
 

Oldgator73

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Dec 28, 2017
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Dover, DE & Mouth of Wilson, VA
It’s hard to believe somebody actually sits around worrying about a nuclear holocaust. There are things, events that may or may not happen that are beyond our control. We live within a few hours of Washington DC and NYC. And right on top of Dover AFB. I am comforted by the fact that we will be obliterated in the first wave of strikes. So with that thought in mind if news of an imminent nuclear attack is announced we will try our best to get as close to a ground zero as possible.
As for Ukraine I only wish Afghanistan and Iraq would fight as hard as the Ukrainians have to keep their freedom.
 

DonTom

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Auburn, CA or Reno, NV
Yah. Could be. Really I’m not up on it.
Just so you understand . . .

There is a percentage above 100% SOC than cannot be used. The greater this percentage the better for the life of the battery. But the range is also reduced by that much by not being able to use it. So they try for a happy medium.

The same happens at the low end. When well below 0% SOC (the reserve) the motors die and leave you stuck. But the battery is not really dead, you just cannot excess this very last part of the battery's charge. This is even worse for the battery. Let it go all the way dead and you will have a ruined very expensive battery, so that is prevented. You're much better off being stuck on the side of the road with the need for a tow truck than a ruined $8,000 battery in today's price ($21,000 in year 2015 for the same battery).

EVs made for the military have an emergency switch so they can use every last drop. The idea here is saving a life is more important than the expensive battery.

The max capacity includes the KWH we cannot use (except military that can use the low end of the charge). Often is around a 10% difference. Depends on how much they want to sacrifice range for battery longevity.

The nominal value is the capacity the battery we can fully access. We cannot charge or use above the nominal capacity. Max battery capacity is totally inaccessible to us in every way.

It's best to see both specs or at least know which they are using when they say "70KWH battery" etc.

My 2018 Tesla M3 Battery Capacity has a max battery capacity of 70.0 kWh. The useable (nominal) is 66.5 kWh. ~5% of the charge is not useable. 66.5KWH available will show as 100% SOC on the screen. Not even regen will let it go above that 66.5 KWH. That is why you have no regen at 100% SOC.

The Harley Livewire you saw has a max capacity of 15.5KWH. Its useable capacity is 13.6 KWH, around 9% difference. Harley is more concerned about the life of their battery than most and the range is reduced more because of it compared to most other electric motorcycles with the same size battery.

On top of all this, they usually say do not charge above 80% unless you need it. That is 80% of the nominal range.

So now you're "up on it" and even know as much about it as I do :).

-Don- Auburn, CA
 
Last edited:

Viajeros

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Joined
Apr 19, 2015
Posts
1,070
Just so you understand . . .

There is a percentage above 100% SOC than cannot be used. The greater this percentage the better for the life of the battery. But the range is also reduced by that much by not being able to use it. So they try for a happy medium.

The same happens at the low end. When well below 0% SOC (the reserve) the motors die and leave you stuck. But the battery is not really dead, you just cannot excess this very last part of the charge. This is even worse for the battery. Let it go all the way dead and you will have a ruined very expensive battery, so that is prevented. You're much better off being stuck on the side of the road with the need for a tow truck than a ruined $8,000 battery in today's price ($21,000 in year 2015 for the same battery).

EVs made for the military have an emergency switch so they can use every last drop. The idea here is saving a life is more important than the expensive battery.

The max capacity includes the KWH we cannot use (except military that can use the low end of the charge). Often is around a 10% difference. Depends on how much they want to sacrifice range for battery longevity.

The nominal value is the capacity the battery we may fully access. We cannot charge or use above the nominal capacity. Max battery capacity is totally inaccessible to us in every way.

It's best to see both specs or at least know which they are using when they say "70KWH battery" etc.

My 2018 Tesla M3 Battery Capacity has a max battery capacity of 70.0 kWh. The useable (nominal) is 66.5 kWh. ~5% of the charge is not useable. 66.5KWH available will show as 100% SOC on the screen. Not even regen will let it go above that 66.5 KWH. That is why you have no regen at 100% SOC.

The Harley Livewire you saw has a max capacity of 15.5KWH. Its useable capacity is 13.6 KWH, around 9% difference. Harley is more concerned about the life of their battery than most and the range is reduced more because of it compared to most other electric motorcycles with the same size battery.

On top of all this, they usually say do not charge above 80% unless you need it. That is 80% of the nominal range.

So now you're "up on it" and even know as much about it as I do :).

-Don- Auburn, CA
Interesting stuff Don. Thanks.

Bjorn in Norway did a series of tests on a model Y to see how many kilometres he could travel after the display read zero percent. I think he averaged 33 kilometres past zero. Good to know. Hope it never comes to that. 😊
 

DonTom

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Auburn, CA or Reno, NV
. I think he averaged 33 kilometres past zero.
They usually try for around 6% in the reserve range.

That's why your SOC at full charge shows as ~6% less than your real range.

As I already explained, not even the reserve can touch past the nominal KWHs of the battery. The battery that seems totally dead and will not move the car an inch still has some of the charge left so the battery is not ruined.

-Don- Auburn, CA
 

jrm1776

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Joined
May 7, 2021
Posts
104
Location
Tennessee
I'm looking forward to trading in our Gas guzzler for the New Electric RV's coming out
 

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