How to cut the roast ?

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JIGGS

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new castle pa.
Hello. I don't know why other than I like to eat. I have gotten into cooking on a gas grill and or a rotisserie. I have bought all kinds of spices and herbs cooking wines and sauces. What i have cooked has been pretty good . Well maybe not the salmon on the hickory plank. Now I know what to do and what to watch for.

My question is after watching some cooking shows they allways say for a tender steaks. roast etc. to cut against the grain and at a angle.  What is the grain and how to tell which way it runs.

thanks jiggs
 

Lowell

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Tempe, AZ
Think of a roast like you would a piece of wood.  The grain runs the length of the piece of wood.  The grain in a roast is somewhat like that.  The strings or grains of a loin for example run the length of the loin, not always in a straight line.  So you want to cut across the loin, not along the length.  This works for long roasts.  Many cuts of roast, the flat ones, have already been cut by the bucher across the grain. I think the cutting on the angle is more for appearance than for tenderness.
 

Carl L

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In the case of a lean, flat cut like a flank steak one cuts flat thin slices with the grain of meat.  The meat is distinctly more tender that way.  A cross grain flank cut is like leather.  Use long flexilbe bladed knife to make the cuts.
 

Just Lou

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Mention of Roast reminded me of the best description of how to cook a roast that I've ever heard.

If you are old enough to know who Gracie Allen was, then you will appreciate this:

How to cook a Roast:

Select a LARGE roast

Select a small roast

Put both roasts in the oven

When the small roast burns,
the LARGE roast is done...


Sorry for the large type.  I must have clicked something I didn't mean to click

 

Marc L

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When you put your roast to cook, it's better if the meat is close to room temperature before putting it to roast.  Less of a shock on the meat, so take it out from the fridge like 1 hour before. 

Also, DON'T cut the roast as soon as it's done.  Let it rest 10 minutes on the cutting board before cutting it so the juice can penetrate the meat.  If you cut it right away, all the good juice will end up on your cutting board and the meat will not be as tender.
 

Sollly

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Bluffdale, UT
Carl Lundquist said:
In the case of a lean, flat cut like a flank steak one cuts flat thin slices with the grain of meat.   The meat is distinctly more tender that way.  A cross grain flank cut is like leather.   Use long flexilbe bladed knife to make the cuts.

Carl, This is contrary to my own experience, and other well know cooks. Are you sure you said that right?


Rob
 

Karl

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Rob,

No, he said it right. A flank steak is very thin to begin with, so making thin, flat cuts is about the only way to do it without ending up with either confetti or long strings of rubber. You still angle the blade slightly from the horizontal, so you are cutting through the grain to some extent.
 

Carl L

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Sollly said:
Carl, This is contrary to my own experience, and other well know cooks. Are you sure you said that right?


Rob

Yup.  You want further outrage?    A flank is properly cooked exactly 3 minutes (180 seconds if you would) on each side -- not a second more -- over a very hot fire.  I use a covered gas barby.    We like it particularly with a sauce diable. 
 

Marsha/CA

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Carl,

We love flank steak.  I cut it a bit on the diagonal as well....And we cook it about the same amout of time as you do.

Think I'll throw one in the freezer and cook it at Quartszite.

Marsha~
 

Carl L

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You ever tried it with a diable sauce.  I use Jim Beard's old recipe and it is a fine accompaniment to a good flank.
 

Ron

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We prefer a nice Buffalo roast.  Nice and tender, lean, more healthy to eat than beef or pork.  For those in Yuma at the Az Market there is a guy from North Dakota that sells really good frozen buffalo, steaks, roasts, Brauts.  Try it you will like it.
 

Carl L

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MarshaLassen/CA said:
Carl....post the receipe for me.

Marsha~

Put 1/2 cup tarragon vinegar,  1/4 cup white wine in a small heavy walled sauce pan.  Add one chopped shallot or green onion (prefer the shallot) and 1 tsp dried tarragon and cook till the liquid is half reduced.  Stir in 1-1/2 cups brown sauce or good canned beef gravy.   Add a dash of Tabasco and 2 tsp of dry mustard.  Bring to boil and simmer 3 minutes.   Season with a few grinds of black pepper.   Strain the sauce or blend it.   It can be made ahead of time and stored in the fridge till use -- reheat before use.   It may sound ferocious but I have not met any carnivore that did not like the stuff.   Works with tri tip too.

To accompany the steak and sauce,  I recommend a big zinfadel or a monster petite syrah.  A good beer works fine also.

 

Marc L

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Karl,

I've known diable sauce for a long time, but yours is totally different then what I am used to.  The one we make in Eastern Canada is more used as a dipping sauce with meat from a fondue or raclette grill.  Here's the recipe:

Sauce Diable

50 mL corn oil
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 medium onion, finely chopped
5 mL corn starch
50 mL chopped pickle or relish
30 mL vinegar
125 mL ketchup
75 mL Worcestershire sauce
2 mL salt
5 mL dry mustard
0.5 mL Tabasco sauce
5 mL capers (optional)

Saut? chopped garlic and onion in corn oil until just soft. Add corn starch and cook for 1 minute. Add chopped pickle, vinegar, ketchup and Worcestershire sauce. Bring to boil then add remaining ingredients. Makes 375 mL.
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I will certainly try yours, I love tarragon anything.
 
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