I think my RV slideout is sagging

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Yesterday when i was looking at the roof of my slideout (outside) i noticed that the rubber seal accross the top was not touching the slideout anymore. There is about a 16th of an inch gap all the way accross.  I dont remember there being a gap before, could have been but i dont remember it.  So i wonder if it is sagging.  I have been in the same spot here for 1 year with it extended. 

I was told not to use a support jack as it could damage the slideout, but now im wondering if i should put allittle pressure on it using a jack and a long board.  My braces are about 11 ft apart so i would need a long board with a jack under it to make it even pressure.
 

regval

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Lawrenceville, Georgia, USA
I've got a TT parked on a lot I own and it's been there for about 4 years. I support the slide out with the screw-type jacks typically sold for that use. Never asked if it was recommended, just thought it would be a good idea to reduce the strain on the slide out mechanism and it's mounting attachments since it's stationary for long periods. I inspect the slide out twice a year to make sure nothing has changed.

You can measure the distance from the sidewall of the coach to the outside edge of the side out wall, first at the top and again at the bottom to determine how much the sag there may be.  Theoretically, the measurements should be equal, but if they are not, the slide out may require adjusting or inspection of the mounting hardware attaching the slide out to the coach.

I also have a 5th wheel camper that we use for traveling. I don't use jacks on it as the slide outs (3) are only extended for short periods of time during the camping stays. The slide outs are retracted while in storage.

 
G

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Thanks regval,  i did not know about the measurement technique.  I will measure it tomorrow and also check it for square as well.  I do have one of those screw jacks that my dad gave me awhile back.  If the slidout is out of wack i can put the jack in the middle of a long board (on its side) and put some pressure on the slideout supports, just enough to bring it into correction is all.  I will be careful and adjust it a tiny bit at a time.
 

Lou Schneider

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The gap you're seeing is at the inside edge of the slideout box.  External jacks only support the outside edge of the box, not the inside.

The external screw jacks are meant to support the outside edge of a tip-out room which tips in and out on a floor mounted hinge, not a slideout room.  You can tell a tip-out room by it's rounded side profile so it can fit through the opening as you tip it in and out from the trailer.

A slideout's weight is supposed to be carried by the lip along the the top of the slideout pressing against the header beam in the trailer wall at the top of the slideout opening.

As the mechanism pushes out at the bottom of the slideout, the lip hits the header and tilts the outer edge of the slideout upwards, removing the weight from the slideout mechanism so it only has to push outwards, not carry the weight.

Try running the slide in slightly and then back out again.  The brake holding the arms extended may have slipped over the course of the year, letting the arms retract slightly.

Or the outside edge of the interior floor may have sagged from supporting the slideout's weight, dropping the inside edge of the slideout.

 

JoelP

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Nov 2, 2016
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San Jose, CA
Perhaps you have a different problem, but I noticed that the cabinet doors started to scrape on the slide out when it was retracted because my superslide had sagged.  When I looked into this further I found that there are adjustment screws, but upon closer examination one of the 3 bolts for adjusting my long slide had snapped off.  I had an RV shop weld a new one in place of the one that broke and the sagging was fixed. Maybe yours is just an adjustment.
 
G

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JoelP said:
Perhaps you have a different problem, but I noticed that the cabinet doors started to scrape on the slide out when it was retracted because my superslide had sagged.  When I looked into this further I found that there are adjustment screws, but upon closer examination one of the 3 bolts for adjusting my long slide had snapped off.  I had an RV shop weld a new one in place of the one that broke and the sagging was fixed. Maybe yours is just an adjustment.

If i can get under there tomorrow ill check it out. I have a really hard time getting down at ground level and a miserable time getting back up afterwords... But if its gonna save me tons of money and an easy fix its worth it...

Thanks again :)
 

JoelP

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There are many YouTubes on adjusting slideouts. Have a look before trying to do any adjustment.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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At our Silver Springs FL home
If your slide-out roof is sagging, you have a roof problem and putting jacks under the floor won't help it any.

It's equally likely the seals have deformed or come loose so that they are no longer in contact the way they should be.
 
G

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Lou Schneider said:
The gap you're seeing is at the inside edge of the slideout box.  External jacks only support the outside edge of the box, not the inside.

The external screw jacks are meant to support the outside edge of a tip-out room which tips in and out on a floor mounted hinge, not a slideout room.  You can tell a tip-out room by it's rounded side profile so it can fit through the opening as you tip it in and out from the trailer.

A slideout's weight is supposed to be carried by the lip along the the top of the slideout pressing against the header beam in the trailer wall at the top of the slideout opening.

As the mechanism pushes out at the bottom of the slideout, the lip hits the header and tilts the outer edge of the slideout upwards, removing the weight from the slideout mechanism so it only has to push outwards, not carry the weight.

Try running the slide in slightly and then back out again.  The brake holding the arms extended may have slipped over the course of the year, letting the arms retract slightly.

Or the outside edge of the interior floor may have sagged from supporting the slideout's weight, dropping the inside edge of the slideout.

Thanks so much, im looking into this today :)
 

JoelP

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Nov 2, 2016
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San Jose, CA
Lou Schneider said:
The gap you're seeing is at the inside edge of the slideout box.  External jacks only support the outside edge of the box, not the inside.

Good point Lou.  I didn't read the symptoms as carefully as you did and was thinking the outside edge had sagged.
 

pkjorlie

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Sep 22, 2021
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Wisconsin
I have a different problem with the slideout on my 2003 Innsbruck. The trailer is set on a permanent site and the slideout stays extended. I'm currently putting down laminate floor throughout. But the slideout floor slopes 1-1/2" inside to outside. The foam cushion/gasket is even all around, top, bottom, and sides. If I try to jack the slideout level, the foam seal is tight at the bottom but wide open at the top. The header wall is plumb on both ends. It's like the end walls of the slideout are out of square.
 

Lou Schneider

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I have a different problem with the slideout on my 2003 Innsbruck. The trailer is set on a permanent site and the slideout stays extended. I'm currently putting down laminate floor throughout. But the slideout floor slopes 1-1/2" inside to outside. The foam cushion/gasket is even all around, top, bottom, and sides. If I try to jack the slideout level, the foam seal is tight at the bottom but wide open at the top. The header wall is plumb on both ends. It's like the end walls of the slideout are out of square.
If you have a flat floor slide, it's not built square on purpose. There are some serious computations that have to be made because the edge of the floor drops down when the slide is fully extended to create the flat floor edge. This tilts the slide inward.

The outside wall of the slide has to fit flush against the main wall of the RV when the slide is retracted and tilted inward so the floor can clear the main floor. The inside edge of the slide has to do the same when the slide is extended and the edge the floor drops down to create the flat floor joint. The end result is the inside lip and the outside wall of the slide aren't parallel and most likely the floor isn't square to the outside wall.

You may have something sagging, or it's equally possible someone simply goofed during the construction process while laying out the angles needed to create a level floor when the slide is extended.
 

pkjorlie

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It isn't a flat floor slide. fully extended the slideout floor lays flat for about 5" on the trailer floor. The level is sitting on a 2x2 block at the back of the slide with bubble centered. the slideout frame is tight to the wall all around the perimeter with an even margin.
 

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pkjorlie

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Sep 22, 2021
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Wisconsin
If you have a flat floor slide, it's not built square on purpose. There are some serious computations that have to be made because the edge of the floor drops down when the slide is fully extended to create the flat floor edge. This tilts the slide inward.

The outside wall of the slide has to fit flush against the main wall of the RV when the slide is retracted and tilted inward so the floor can clear the main floor. The inside edge of the slide has to do the same when the slide is extended and the edge the floor drops down to create the flat floor joint. The end result is the inside lip and the outside wall of the slide aren't parallel and most likely the floor isn't square to the outside wall.

You may have something sagging, or it's equally possible someone simply goofed during the construction process while laying out the angles needed to create a level floor when the slide is extended.
Lou, See above. I forgot to tag you in my response
 
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