Improving handling of motor home

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Pfun 1

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northern Ill
If I fill my water full when traveling will the added weight on my 2012 Thor 28PD improve the handling.
 

4EZDAYS

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I cant see where the added weight would be significant enough to improve handling and you would be sacrificing MPG.  I usually take only enough water for a few "flushes" to get me where I'm going.  Suggest you test the theory first with a few cases of Stella Artois and if that doesn't work, the rewards will be there when you arrive.  :)
 

Larry N.

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Kreuzfahrt said:
If I fill my water full when traveling will the added weight on my 2012 Thor 28PD improve the handling.

Unlikely. Whether full or empty, it won't make much difference in handling or mileage. Running the correct tire pressure is the biggest thing you can do without specific mods. Get your coach weighed as it will be on trips (fully loaded), then use the tire manufacturer's pressure recommendation tables to set your tire pressure. When I did that for my 2010 Bounder, I cut 20 psi from the front tires (less from the rear), and it made a monster difference in the handling. After you've done this you'll know whether you need anything else done.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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There may be some small effect, depending on where the tank is located and how much it holds. 100 gals of water weighs about 840 lbs, so the additional weight is maybe 4-5% of your gross. However, in a motorhome it is usually located low and between the axles, where the weight has little impact on handling.

What sort of "handling" are you concerned about? Body roll? Sway? Directional stability (steering)? Ride comfort? There are different things that affect each.

There is an extensive article in the Forum Library on Motorhome Handling.

http://www.rvforum.net/joomla/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=424:mh-handling&catid=24:tech-topics&Itemid=68
 

garyb1st

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Gary Brinks article is excellent and should be required reading for anyone buying a new or used motorhome.  Not only from a safety perspective but also from a dollars and sense standpoint.  I have read a number of threads where individuals have driven many hundreds of miles to have a specific facility address their handing concerns.  Some times the costs have been significant.  Now I see why. 

Before reading Motorhome handling, I assumed that increasing fuel prices is the primary reason I come across so many used motorhomes with very low miles.  Now I'm thinking it's more a matter of driveability.  As I search for the perfect motorhome one of my concerns is buying what I think is the the right one only to find it handles like the proverbial bull in a china shop.  Now if that happens I'll know what to look for.  There are a number of potential solutions.  While some may be challenging and costly, others may be resolved relatively easily. 
 

taoshum

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Taos, NM
Gary RV Roamer said:
There may be some small effect, depending on where the tank is located and how much it holds. 100 gals of water weighs about 840 lbs, so the additional weight is maybe 4-5% of your gross. However, in a motorhome it is usually located low and between the axles, where the weight has little impact on handling.

What sort of "handling" are you concerned about? Body roll? Sway? Directional stability (steering)? Ride comfort? There are different things that affect each.a

There is an extensive article in the Forum Library on Motorhome Handling.

http://www.rvforum.net/joomla/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=424:mh-handling&catid=24:tech-topics&Itemid=68

840lbs is about 20% of the weight of a Jeep toad (840/4200);  It might not do much to affect the "handling", but for braking, it's about the same as adding 20% to the toad weight... lots of people pay big $$ to activate toad brakes but then give it away with full tanks.  Just sayin'
 

DearMissMermaid

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on the move, USA
I would definitely check tire pressure and your own speed.

Some motorhomes have a comfortable speed where they handle superbly.  It may not be the pedal to the metal speed though.  If you are in a hurry, take a plane.

Not all motorhomes are happy going 80 mph but I see so many doing just that and some are weaving all over the place.

 

bertnspike

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Sebastian
My MH had very low mileage, and I suspect the handling was one of the reasons (elderly snowbirds was another) it was sold.  It WAS hard to handle.  After having a Steer Safe system installed, getting the MH weighed properly and getting the tires inflated properly, destroyed rear bushings were found to be the worst culprit.  Handling is great now.  MPG?  meh.  It's a rolling house.  Whattaya gonna do?

Susan
 

carson

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Florida, USA
Kreuzfahrt.. a little side note.. (my little sense of humor)

  Your screen name is quite apropos for your problem. Kreuzfahrt translates to " Cross Travel" from the German language. Hope you get it fixed.
 

ArdraF

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Feb 12, 2006
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My personal opinion is that a motorhome that sits high and is on relatively small tires will not handle as well as one that perhaps sits lower and is on substantial tires.  Drive behind some of them for a while and you can almost see the differences in handling.  The former often sway a lot, especially when being passed by trucks, while the latter look much more stable.  A heavier one also won't sway as much.  It has to do both with the center of gravity and how well the motorhome is built.  That's why the type we call "high end" often seem to handle so much better than those on the "low end" of the spectrum.

Ardra F.
 
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