Innverter generator run time.

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Excalibur

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Looking at buying a dual fuel inverter generator and just doing preliminary research. Firman 3200/4000 watt unit. Specs say can run 9 hours on a 1.8 gallon tank of gasoline, but says nothing about using propane. Does anyone have one of these and have a ballpark idea of how long it might run at 50% load on a 20 gallon propane tank? I need backup 120v power for a peritoneal dialysis machine in the camper in case we lose power or boondocking. Thanks.
 
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Looks like about 3/4 gallons of Gas (About six pounds) is equal to about 4 pounds of Propane but .. They were not percise on that
And I seem to recall ... Different numbers.

Here are some other numbers
A gallon of gasoline contains around 115,010 British thermal units (BTU)
1 gallon of propane produces 91,452 BTU,

From this. in theory the Gasoline will run longer per gallon.
1.8 gallons of gasoline = 207,018 BTU
And you'd need 2.264 gallons of Propane to generate that same amount of heat'Energy

Now that's all Theory. in practice due to different ways the fuels mix with air. I have no idea.
 
Thanks for the numbers John, but I really don't want to have to carry a generator with a full gas tank and a can of gas in my van. Gas vapors are too dangerous for my thinking. That's why I am thinking propane.
 
That is why we carry dual fuel generators. I've had mine for 6 years and it has never seen a drop of gasoline. But I would in an emergency use some. Mine is the Champion 3500 dual fuel and it connects directly to my propane system. So never need to shut it down to refuel. High useage and so far, no problems.
 
I can seriously understand not wanting a container of gasoline INSIDE the passenger/driver's compartment of a vehicle. But so you know I was only providing numbers not saying one or the other is the same... There are other advantages to propane as well. But that said some of the sites said the Propane powered generators do not last as long (Years that is) ... I just provided numbers. I am thinking about buying a generator but... Your Gasoline concern is one of the considerations.
 
I'm sure you looked but I was on the Walmart site checking these out cause my Aunt who's younger than me live in Beverley Hills Florida and they have it good for storms cause of their level, still get the rains and wind just not flooded out and I'm thinking of moving in the area so I was looking then up. I don't remember all the details but the couple I saw used gas , propane and solar. I thought this was cool. I was telling them to get one , seems like a winner. But I've only used my ones on a job. Maybe it's something to look at. I've seen generators in RVs but I never noticed anyone take them out or if they can stay in the RV area with the door open. I'm not a dummy I know they need to vent just I guess they may need other hook ups ??
 
I have that Firman model but haven't run it all that much to have first hand experience with fuel consumption. However, propane has 27% less energy per gallon than gasoline so the consumption is proportionally higher. Remember, though, that the fuel consumption varies with the electrical load (amps/watts).

This website shows how to estimate propane consumption and uses a 4000 watt load as an example. It concludes that at full load (4000 watts) it would use 0.87 gal/hour. Your 50% load would be half that.

Some advantages of propane vs gasoline is that the fuel burns 100% clean, there is no concern about leaving fuel in the generator tank or carb, the stored fuel has an indefinite shelf life, and the fuel container is extremely rugged and safe to carry.
 
I have that Firman model but haven't run it all that much to have first hand experience with fuel consumption. However, propane has 27% less energy per gallon than gasoline so the consumption is proportionally higher. Remember, though, that the fuel consumption varies with the electrical load (amps/watts).

This website shows how to estimate propane consumption and uses a 4000 watt load as an example. It concludes that at full load (4000 watts) it would use 0.87 gal/hour. Your 50% load would be half that.

Some advantages of propane vs gasoline is that the fuel burns 100% clean, there is no concern about leaving fuel in the generator tank or carb, the stored fuel has an indefinite shelf life, and the fuel container is extremely rugged and safe to carry.
Thank you, Gary. This is exactly the info I needed. I will bookmark that website for future reference.
 
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One thing I will say about Propane and Hollywood is a scene from N.C.I.S. (The original) A man is barricated in a Trailer.. Gibbs whistles and the man's dog comes running then Gibbs double tapps the propane tanks.. As the wheel from what's left of the trailer rolls to a stop and fall over near them Denozo. says "I think you got 'em Boss".

Reallity I very seriously doubt that woudl happen.. First I'm not sure Gibbes pistol had the "oomph" to puncture the tanks and at worst you would get a jet of flame not a KABOOM. but of then hollywood SP/FX rarley deals with reality.
 
The most I was saying about the gas , propane and solar generator was because my Aunt had mentioned how your not prepared cause gas stations run out quick and then no power to run gas stations so I figured propane and solar be a good back up. I do remember that it was so long to solar charge then like 6 to 8 hrs use depending on what your running it could be less. The propane I don't recall but I told her to maybe have a 100gal tank in a shed in the back yard or so for that time of year. I am gonna check that website too to get an idea.
 
When I was younger John we would shoot up things back where we would go wheelin, propane tanks were 1 thing old rusty tanks . We had ones that shot across or up and a couple that did a bang a small like blow up. Think it was because it has fumes and like gas , the fumes seem to have more of an umff
 
When I was younger John we would shoot up things back where we would go wheelin, propane tanks were 1 thing old rusty tanks . We had ones that shot across or up and a couple that did a bang a small like blow up. Think it was because it has fumes and like gas , the fumes seem to have more of an umff
How many shots did you fire at one time? Yes if you Puncture the tank (And what gun did you use) and then wait a bit and fire again they can make a BOOM but Bang-Bang as Gibbs did. not so likely.

Of course blowing things up is not a healthy activity. Less you take proper precautions like they do on MythBusters. (They have a lot of fun on that show)
 
We mostly do dry camping in remote locations. We use a Honda EU2200i generator and modified it to operate on propane using a Hutch Mountain Conversion Kit. These convenient, light-weight, quiet and reliable propane generators are very popular within the RV community.

We only use this generator in conjunction with a MicroAir EasyStart to run our air conditioner when we get inadvertently caught in hot weather. We generally avoid hot weather as what is the point to being in the outdoors and then have to stay in an air conditioned RV...

Operating with propane eliminates any need or hassle of having to take along gasoline on camping trips or having the obnoxious smell of a gasoline powered generator in your camping area. Gasoline goes bad over time and can gum up the engine fuel system making it inoperable until repaired. Propane can be stored indefinitely and will never gum up the engine fuel system. And unless you also have a gasoline furnace, hot water heater, refrigerator and stove, you will still always need and use propane when camping anyhow.
 
The most I was saying about the gas , propane and solar generator was because my Aunt had mentioned how your not prepared cause gas stations run out quick and then no power to run gas stations so I figured propane and solar be a good back up. I do remember that it was so long to solar charge then like 6 to 8 hrs use depending on what your running it could be less. The propane I don't recall but I told her to maybe have a 100gal tank in a shed in the back yard or so for that time of year. I am gonna check that website too to get an idea.
A generator powered by gasoline or propane is a totally different thing than a solar "generator" which is basically a battery with a solar panel to recharge it.
 
@ John from Detroit, well it was a long time ago we were in Texas in the woods, so I don't recall how many shots we were just taking shots at stuff we set up not carelessly though but the guns were all different from a 22 to an elephant gun, 2 barrel 1 trigger it was old and some pistols so sorry not sure what was used at that time. I do know TV is different from some shots in the woods at things we loaded up in the truck. But still was a hell of a good time. Think we even shot up a 4ft wooden ladder , a table and chairs, just odds and ends. It's all fun till we clean up and throw it back in the truck , lol .
 
We mostly do dry camping in remote locations. We use a Honda EU2200i generator and modified it to operate on propane using a Hutch Mountain Conversion Kit. These convenient, light-weight, quiet and reliable propane generators are very popular within the RV community.

We only use this generator in conjunction with a MicroAir EasyStart to run our air conditioner when we get inadvertently caught in hot weather. We generally avoid hot weather as what is the point to being in the outdoors and then have to stay in an air conditioned RV...

Operating with propane eliminates any need or hassle of having to take along gasoline on camping trips or having the obnoxious smell of a gasoline powered generator in your camping area. Gasoline goes bad over time and can gum up the engine fuel system making it inoperable until repaired. Propane can be stored indefinitely and will never gum up the engine fuel system. And unless you also have a gasoline furnace, hot water heater, refrigerator and stove, you will still always need and use propane when camping anyhow.
Thanks for posting about the propane conversion. I sold my 2200 to buy the 3200. Just checked there web site to see if they make a kit for mine. They don’t but sent them a email to see if any plans to make one. Looks like a good option.
 
My brother in law was a volunteer firefighter until he injured his back falling through a roof, one thing he feels strongly about is not storing / using 20 pound propane tanks on porches, decks, etc. next to houses, he says he has seen way too many of those things go boom during house fires, sometimes they were the cause of the house fire. Just something to think about.

As to models to consider, Harbor Freight recently introduced a 5000 watt inverter dual fuel model.
 
Ya I'd say by the house is not good. I've even made areas for my grills away from the house. Told my Aunt if she got one of the gas, propane and solar ones to put a spare little shed to the back corner of her yard able to hold some fresh gas that time of year and maybe a 100lb propane tank with a long hose to connect. Though I'd put it in the shed and run a cord from the generator under ground in pvc to the house. I know we're not talking house I'm rambling sorry.
 
Well the generators I saw just seemed cool having all 3 in the one generator, gave alot of options if you needed them.
 
he feels strongly about is not storing / using 20 pound propane tanks on porches, decks, etc. next to houses,
Codes typically allow bottles up to 100 gallons to be against the side of a house or building. Larger ones were to be at least 10' away from the structure. This comes from the TX code book.

I have watched a motorhome with an ASME tank that was nearly full burn and more recently a fifth wheel with 2, propane bottles burn just a few spaces from us and in neither case did anything explode. While it is possible for one to explode, that is pretty unusual.
 
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