Keep the boat or buy and RV????

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nowindtoday

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The boat is as big as a motorhome; 33 ft long with a 12 foot beam.  Twin 454's, genset and much more.
Berthed on Lake Mead.
Starting to think that I would get more use out of a Class A motorhome.
A year or two from retirement...
Thoughts?

No Wind Today
 

Carl L

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The guy you want to talk to is Tom Jones our wizop.  He has gone both ways:  land and salt water yachts. 
 

Ned

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You can go a lot more places with a motor home and the fuel economy is much better too, unless you get a sail boat :)
 

Carl L

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Ned said:
You can go a lot more places with a motor home and the fuel economy is much better too, unless you get a sail boat :)

If you have to talk about fuel economy, you can't afford either.  ;D
 

Shayne

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My sentiments exactly Karl. 
When  they  start asking mileage  I shun away.
 

Ron

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Welcome to the RV Forum.

I think I would get tired of looking at the same scenery every time I go out.  It might be great for some folks but I would get tired of it real soon.  Also a boat that big must burn a lot of fuel in a day of use compared to a motorhome.  However, different things for different folks.  I guess the choice is yours.
 

NWRVer

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B.O.A.T. Break Out Another Thousand
R.V. Roaming Vacation

I've had both a large boat, 35'er and now a comparable RV.  The RV is much easier to use (for me at least). I can park it next to the house and just go when ever I want. It's always ready  The boat I had to moor some place ($), gas at the marinas is ALWAYS more expensive ($$), and was limited by weather, tides, coast line, etc.  Also, have had some seriously close calls and problems with my boat.  You just can't pull over and fix things.  And tow boats are really really expensive ($$$).  On the other hand, I did see some amazing things in my boat: whales and other sea life, hidden coves, camping on beaches that only I can get to.  But I'm still happier with the RV.
 

Smoky

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We sold our boat (and home) and I gave up a second career of commercial fishing in order to full time in our motorhome.  I have never looked back, though my Admiral sometimes says she misses sunning herself in a secluded cove on the Chesapeake.

This is a subject close and dear to my heart.

I have found that the "cruising" is better, vaster, and more interesting on land.  I once cruised to explore everything I could find on the water from Canada to Florida.  Now I am exploring the huge vastness of the entire United States. 

A big diesel pusher is less costly than a big gas boat, especially in terms of fuel and maintenance.  Even if you do most of your own maintenance, you practically have to be a triple jointed midget to crawl around in and under the boat.

I am glad I had my boating experience and made many friends to cherish during that time.  But moving on to a land yacht is the best thing for me, especially at my senior age.  In the end you have to make your own personal decision.  Just wanted you to know I have been there, done that, and never looked back with regret.
 

nowindtoday

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Smoky,
I think you hit the nail on the head.
Carl,
My openning post did not mention mileage or fuel costs.  I am used to and prepared to invest in what I enjoy.

I think the decision maker is the fact that I have seen most of Lake Mead and since the boat is too large to trailer, look into the motorhome and broaden our horizons.

Thanks for all the comments,
No Wind Today
PS "No Wind Today" is what we hope for when we get to the lake.  Over Memorial Day, winds were 35 to 40 gusting to 50 MPH.  Three unfortunate people lost their lives due to winds and bad jugdgment.
 

ttbeachbum

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Smoky said:
We sold our boat (and home) and I gave up a second career of commercial fishing in order to full time in our motorhome.? I have never looked back, though my Admiral sometimes says she misses sunning herself in a secluded cove on the Chesapeake.

This is a subject close and dear to my heart.

I have found that the "cruising" is better, vaster, and more interesting on land.? I once cruised to explore everything I could find on the water from Canada to Florida.? Now I am exploring the huge vastness of the entire United States.?

A big diesel pusher is less costly than a big gas boat, especially in terms of fuel and maintenance.? Even if you do most of your own maintenance, you practically have to be a triple jointed midget to crawl around in and under the boat.

I am glad I had my boating experience and made many friends to cherish during that time.? But moving on to a land yacht is the best thing for me, especially at my senior age.? In the end you have to make your own personal decision.? Just wanted you to know I have been there, done that, and never looked back with regret.

Now DH is opposite, he wants to give up the TT for a boat to become a commercial fisherman.  He has the big fish itch bad.  I am torn about it.
 

Smoky

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Well re DH's big fish itch, I can share this.

Commercial fishing is tiring and sometimes dangerous work with very long hours if you are going to be successful at it.  It also requires government licensing.  and if you take passengers for hire, it requires stringent testing by the Coast Guard.  It took me a year to prepare for my CG test.  The tests are long and difficult and take up an entire day.  They require an enormous amount of memorization.  I had study books that spanned 18 inches on my bookshelf and also I paid Houston Co. for computerized training.

Once you get your CG ticket, then there are the state guide licenses.  Some states, like Maryland and Alaska, have long waiting lists that take years to reach the top.  Unless you are fortunate enough to first get your CG ticket, and then pay someone who is retiring to transfer their license to you.  I don't know about other states, but in Alaska that can cost tens of thousands of dollars, and in Maryland you are looking at 5 to 10 thousand dollars to buy a license rather than wait 5 or 10 years till you get to the top of the waiting list.  Also, in Maryland, you must serve an apprenticeship on someone else's vessel before you can get the state license.  The CG also requires a certain number of hours on a vessel comparable to what you are being licensed for before you can even take their tests.

Once you begin, it is a low profit business.  If you love the water and want to fish and boat every day, you do get your boat expense and depreciation paid for via tax deductions.  But a typical day on a Maryland charter boat is up at 4:30 am to ready the vessel.  Depart at 6:30 am to work a long hard day under the hot sun and humid air.  Back in at 3:30 pm to clean fish.  Then a boat scrub down leaving you exhausted at 5 pm.  And you get to do it all over again the next morning.

I loved this life when i first retired from corporate life in 1992.  I met many wonderful people and had many wonderful adventures.

But then as my body grew older and my joints ached longer, it got to be a job not an avocation.  IN 2003 I got my first tasted of RVing when I took off from fishing for the entire Maryland season.  I found the running expenses much lower, and the pleasure and enjoyment much larger.  I could still fish when I wanted to.  But now I fish for me rather than for paying high demand customers.  There is nothing I can compare to the pressure of finding fish for customers who have high expectations.  Insurance, fuel, slip fees versus campground fees, interesting places to visit, and the most interesting people to visit, all weighed in on the RV side.  At my age, the decision was a no brainer.

If DH is thinking more in terms of a small bass boat and quiet waters, then the costs and amount of work is less, though the government testing requirements will still be stringent if he choses to do this for hire.

A lot of guides work illegally, skipping all the testing, but I would not advise that course.  One mishap with a customer, and you would be in very deep doo doo as an unlicensed guide.

I repeat all this not to discourage DH, but to help make sure his eyes are wide open.  Someone did this for me when I first caught the fishing guide option, and I was glad they did.  :D



 

ttbeachbum

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Smokey,

Thanks for the comments.  I have been researching the licensing requirements.  I am such a goody two shoes (to make up for all rebel years of being caught!).  Is there a special Captain's license in addition to passing the CG test?  I thought there were a couple of regulatory tests that had to be met to have paying passengers, maybe it's a New York law...

I personally do not think DH is up to challenge (he already has a bad back including hx of back surgery).  I can be honest here because he doesn't know about this forum  ;);  I know of the hard work involved as BIL is a Commerical Pary Fishing captain and owner.  I think it seems glamerous.  Both DH and friend (whose 30' boat we play with) probably would love to go into this business together, but DF (dear friend) makes too much money on his day job to ever take such a cut.  I think this is just a big fish itch.  I need to get him out on the boat to just have fun and catch (I usually pilot the boat and/or take the pixs) while they are tiring the fish.  I think we both need to keep our day jobs and save so we can RV and play on the water (or at least win Lotto).

Thanks again for the confirming reality check.

 

Smoky

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The primary licensing requirement in the United States is the coast guard test.  The simplest license is what they call the 6 pack, which allows an uninspected vessel to carry up to 6 people.  Once you have that license you are a captain.  At least the CG refers to you as Captain Shepherd or whatever when you pass the test.

I passed a higher grade than 6 pack, because my time served on vessels included a 100 ton vessel and a 50 ton vessel.  I ended up with a 100 ton master license combined with a commercial towing endorsement.  Towing, incidentally, is more profitable and less work, though more dangerous sometimes, than fishing.  I gave serious consideration to going to work for a commercial towing company.  I would have had 8 hour days, mostly waiting for calls, and no expenses or upkeep to worry about.  Just wait for the call, board the boat, and direct the crew on hooking up and bringing to port.  I elected to go RVing instead.  ;D

Any commercial fishing, whether for hire or for the seafood market, has to be concerned with state regulations that are separate from Federal (Coast Guard) regulations.  The Coast Guard does not care whether or not you have a guide license if you are carrying passengers for hire.  But you better have the CG license when they board.  The CG also does not care about a crab boat captain, lobster captain, commercial hook and line captain, as long as there are no passengers on board.  The CG DOES care about alcohol and drugs.  You MUST be in an official random drug testing program if you are using your license ... i.e. carrying passengers for hire.  If you ever get involved in a commercial "incident" and are not already enrolled in random testing, you lose your license and worse.  And if any drugs are ever found on board, the same.  Alcohol can be on board, but the licensed captain can not drink it when carrying passengers for hire.

On the state level, most of them DO care if you have a CG license.  Most states will not license a guide or charter captain if they do not have a CD license.  However they will license someone who only wants to fish commercially as long as they do not carry passengers for hire.

The entire process is intimidating, but it sure does separate the men from the boys.  If your heart truly is into commercial fishing, it is worth jumping all the hoops.  And yes, there is some glamour to being a commercially licensed captain.  But the desire for glamour and money is not the kind of motive that will help you stay the course.  I have been there, done that, enjoyed the experience, but i do not miss it at all in my new RVing life.  However I still do use many of the skills I learned as a licensed charter captain and crabber.

Why not have your husband read this thread and see if his interest remains as high after reading?  If so, you better stand back heheh.  Nothing more determined than a sea captain on his/her way up the ladder!
 

JerArdra

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Nowindtoday,

We had a sailboat on San Francisco bay for several years and finally exhausted all the places to see.  Still we were almost ready to move up to a 41 foot sailboat but decided to try motorhoming.  What we found is that there were so many more places to see because the entire U.S. and the world was waiting at the end of the next highway.  The bottom line is, we're now in our 5th motorhome and are still glad we made the change.  BTW, from experience we know that there are no where near the number of places to visit on Lake Mead as there are in SF Bay, the Delta, and the close by ocean ports.

If you afford it, keep the boat get a MH and try it and I'll betcha you sell the boat

JerryF
 
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