Leveling off-kilter 5th

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Frank B

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Apr 23, 2005
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1,380
Location
Calgary, Alberta
Just bought (haven't taken delivery yet) a 23 foot fifth to replace our aging 18.5.  Our 1981 vintage 18.5 has separate cranks for each of the front legs, so leveling it has never been a problem.  The new one, however, has two legs operated by the same crank.  We often camp in out-of-the-way places where the terrain can be quite uneven.  What is the procedure for leveling a fifth where both leveling legs are operated by the same crank?  If it is leaning to one side or the other in the site, how do you raise only one side to get it level?

I assume that, while the fifth is still attached to the truck, one would drop the foot on the low side and crank till it is level, then drop the other foot.  However, what if raising the fifth on one foot begins to lift the back of the truck before the fifth is level?

Thanks for any tips and tricks that anyone might offer.

Frank.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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At our Silver Springs FL home
It's a shame so many newer fivers have dropped the individually cranked legs - it can be a nuisance on uneven ground. 

Basically you are going to drop one foot like you said, setting it to closly match the angle of the terrain.  But first get the trailer rear end level, using blocks under the wheels as needed.

Obviously you don't want to lift the rear of the truck via the hitch, so you may have to jockey the leg positions some to avoid that.  I suppose in extreme conditions you might want to put some blocks under the low side of the truck rear wheels to bring it more level, making the positioning of the legs easier.    A fifth wheel hitch that "rocks" from side to side also helps - an example if the RBW Little Rocker.  See http://www.pplmotorhomes.com/parts/rv-hitches/94-1116.htm for an example.  Quite a few hitches now offer this feature and it helps prevent binding of the hitch on uneven ground.
 

Frank B

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Apr 23, 2005
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1,380
Location
Calgary, Alberta
Gary:

>It's a shame so many newer fivers have dropped the individually cranked legs - it can be a nuisance on uneven ground.

Basically you are going to drop one foot like you said, setting it to closly match the angle of the terrain.  But first get the trailer rear end level, using blocks under the wheels as needed.<

OK.  I've done that with the 18,5 as well in really bad situations.  I always take a few beams with me just for that purpose.  Guess I should build myself a couple of stepped blocks as well.

Thanks for the tips.  I just wanted to be sure that I had the right idea.

Frank.
 

N Smock

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Mar 9, 2005
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246
Location
Long Branch, NJ
Frank


As Gary said put planks under the wheels to get the trailer as level as possible while on the truck. Next drop each strut down so that there is the same clearance from the strut pad to the ground, this is done using the lock pins in the strut. Next jack up and release the truck then level fore and aft with the struts. One point is to make sure that initially extended the strut enough so that during the leveling you have enough length in the strut to retract.


Nelson
 
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