Looking for recommendations for 8000lb GVW 5th wheel

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oldryder

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Avon MN
Wife and I have decided to downsize from a 40' DP to something we can pull with a 1/2 ton pick-up. Only 2 of us plus dogs. This past summer we rented a couple smaller units (a 24' no slides and a 28' 2 slides) to confirm we could be happy with a smaller rig. WE found the 28' 2 slide unit to be ore than adequate excluding some layout related issues.

We would appreciate advice from others that have experience with the smaller 5th wheels. Referrals to specific models would be great. Used or new also OK.

Assumptions:

properly configured 1/2 ton is rated for 12,000 lbs. From experience I don't want to be above about 75% of the rated capacity. Truck will be bought with towing in mind.

seems like the 8000 - 9000 lb max limits RV to 2 slides. is this correct?

We would strongly prefer a layout that allows using the bathroom and kitchen with the slides retracted assuming thats an option. (The larger rental we used this summer could not be used for lunch with the slides in.)

thx to anyone taking the time to offer advice.

mark in MN
 

Bob C.

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Aug 8, 2018
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I have a 29', double slide fifth wheel. P pulled it for a year with a 1/2 ton GMC All Terrain with a 5 1/2 foot box. I did have to change the fifth wheel hitch to pull it. I had no problems other than I never felt completely safe. I up graded to a 3/4'HD GMC All Terrain HD and life is good.
 

steveblonde

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Very few 1/2 tons have the payload capacity for a loaded road ready 5er look at the yellow payload decal drivers side door jam , most are in that 1400 -1600lb range BUT THERE ARE EXCEPTIONS - i had a work 1/2 ton 2019 ford ext cab 8ft box with a 2500,lb payload. 5.6 boxes are also problematic. 8000gvwr trailers are typicaly light bexause they use flimsy materials , tread carefully. Not impossible but a hard task good luck
 

Knobs

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WRT towing & payload limits, with a 1/2 ton truck, payload will be the limiting factor rather than tow rating. You will have more flexibility in that regard with a travel trailer vs a 5th wheel.
 

tlmgcamp

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My dinette is on my slide. The trailer is fully usable with the slide retracted. After having the slide mechanism replaced at 4 months old, I was told not to use the slide in the retracted position. Never got a real solid explanation why after a number of inquiries...just sayin
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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As the others have said, cargo capacity (payload) is going to be dicey. An 8000 lb 5W has a pin weight in the 1600-2000 lb range plus you need additional payload for you, passengers, the 5W hitch, and any gear carried in the truck. And you will want at least a "standard bed" (6.5 ft) - the short 5.5 ft truck beds are seldom adequate for 5W towing (risk of cab strikes).

You would be much better off with a 3/4 ton, where the typical payload is in that range. It otherwise be configured much like a half-ton.
 

oldryder

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thx everyone. I'm convinced a 1/2 ton truck won't be adequate. I like to take lots of stuff along so a 3/4 or 1 ton is necessary. Now I have to decide on an engine assuming a camper around 12- 14,000 gvw..
 

TonyL

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I will say that the exhaust brake ability on our diesel is awesome. Never need to worry about brake fade on long descents when combined with the towhaul switch. I don't know if gas trucks have any engine brake capabilities. Going up the hills ain't no problem either 👍
For what it's worth, our UK fifth wheel is a 26 ft Evergreen Ecolite. Unladen weight of 3 1/4 ton with 1 ton payload.
Been towing it since 2012 with a Nissan Navara (Frontier you call them)
Single slide club lounge layout.
No slider hitch and only struck the cab once due to my stupidity. It can be done with a short bed, and don't forget, our roads are smaller than the US.
 

CharlesinGA

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50 miles south of Atlanta, GA
I will say that the exhaust brake ability on our diesel is awesome. Never need to worry about brake fade on long descents when combined with the towhaul switch. I don't know if gas trucks have any engine brake capabilities. Going up the hills ain't no problem either 👍
Gas engines have a lot more engine braking capability than a diesel (without exhaust braking) but not as much as a diesel (with exhaust braking). This is due to the fact that a gas engine has a throttle plate or butterfly that when closed to idle restricts air flow through the engine. Diesels have some compression resistance due to the high compression, but it doesn't help much and there is no throttle plate to restrict air flow. A diesel with an exhaust brake basically is blocking off the exhaust so 99% of it cannot escape and turns the engine into a compressor.

Exhaust brakes are either a heavy butterfly plate in the exhaust to close it off (as I recently installed) and on my engine it creates over a hundred horsepower of braking effect. A turbo with variable geometry vanes that can be enabled as an exhaust brake is even more efficient at producing braking horsepower.

New trucks integrate the control of the exhaust brake with the transmission to provide lockup of torque converter, down shifting to maintain selected speed and control of engine rpm. Its basically push a button and sit back and watch.

Charles
 

longhaul

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The 12000 lbs tow ratings is for rv and non rv trailers of all types.
Some trailers like a 12000 GN or 5th wheel rv trailer may have 20%-25% hitch weight = 2400-3000 lb hitch weight. Now add 'nother 200 lbs for a 5th wheel hitch system and more weight for stuff in the bed .

A 8000 lb 5th wheel rv trailer may have a 1600 lb-2000 lb hitch weight now add the hitch and other stuff in the bed and your looking at well over 2000 lbs in the bed.

The only 1/2 ton truck I would recommend is a F150HDPP with the 4800 rawr. Most F150HDPP have around 2400-2500 lb in the bed sitting on the rear axle payloads.

Ram or GM 1/2 ton trucks offer a 4000-4100 rawr P tires and wheels/rear suspension.

If your looking for the truck I would recommend any 250/2500 ith a full floating rear axle rated 6000 on up to GM 6600 rawr for well over 3000 lb in the bed payloads.

We have a 28RK model with two slides at 11400 lbs for my 2500 Dodge/Cummins.
The last two trailers we've owned were RK models with lots counter space across the back of the trailer.
Brands ?? WE use the trailer for a camper only. So brands don't mean much for us.

Good luck in the hunt
 
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Frizlefrak

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thx everyone. I'm convinced a 1/2 ton truck won't be adequate. I like to take lots of stuff along so a 3/4 or 1 ton is necessary. Now I have to decide on an engine assuming a camper around 12- 14,000 gvw..

Good decision. Some 1500 series (AKA "half-ton") trucks can be configured to tow what you're looking at, but I think you'll be MUCH happier with a 2500. Spare capacity is a beautiful thing.

Think about it this way....say you get a little dose of mayhem....a blown tire, a sudden 40 MPH crosswind, a panic stop, losing your trailer brakes coming down a steep grade (blown fuse from reality)....which truck would you rather be in....a 1500 or a 2500?

Either a gasser or a diesel 2500 will do the job nicely up to about 12K. More than that, I'd step up to a 3500. If you tow primarily in the flat lands and in low elevations, I'd go with a gasser. If you tow up and down steep grades in high elevations, I'd go diesel.
 

Cameodon

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Edgewater, fl
As far as I’m concerned, 12,000 is way to much for a 1/2 ton, glad you decided against it. I’m not much for getting all involved it weight stickers, I’ll leave that to the “weight police” here! 😀
I’m towing a 36’ Crosswinds Cameo5th wheel with a 2020 F-250 with the 7.3 gasser, 10 speed tranny. The thing tows, handles great, no problem at all.
 

SC5thWheeler

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I've towed a couple of different trailers in that weight range with a GMC 2500 gas engine. It did perfectly fine.

It was working pretty hard up grades and it drank fuel (8-9 mpg), but was up to the task. The only really annoying thing was that it wanted to downshift on a slight grade with cruise on. I was happy to lose 5 mph without cruise instead of revving the engine so high so I rarely used cruise control.

That said, I now have an F250 diesel and it's like night and day. Tons of power but it comes at a big price tag.
 

Bearcatrp

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Jul 11, 2019
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Central Minnesota
thx everyone. I'm convinced a 1/2 ton truck won't be adequate. I like to take lots of stuff along so a 3/4 or 1 ton is necessary. Now I have to decide on an engine assuming a camper around 12- 14,000 gvw..
Go one ton. Tabs are $120.00 vs over $400 for 3/4 ton. I upgraded last year from a 3/4 ton. Since you’re in Minnesota like me, mostly flat terrain. I went with gas instead of diesel. I don’t do much mountain hauling. But if you will travel allot through mountains, consider diesel. I wanted diesel but maintenance costs are higher for diesel. My Ram 3500 6.4 engine with a 8 speed transmission pulls my 5th wheel just fine. Good luck.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Elaborate why? I think if the components are barely at the rating they claim it is actually very sound advice.
Sorry - I didn't see your question until just now. They are telling you its ok to sit or stand in the slideout when it is deployed and dangling in the air, but not when it is retracted. How is one OK and not the other?

Slide mechanism vary, so it's hard to give a simplistic answer. Some slides have rollers or skid blocks underneath and any weight on the retracted slide actually rests on the floor underneath. Others are floating, with the slide supported only where it passes thru the sidewall, but that support is the same as when it is deployed. It is cantilevered, with the pivot point at the floor under the sidewall and the horizontal forces pushing against the sidewall. The force is on the outside of the wall pushing inward when the slide is retracted, and on the inside pushing outward when the slide is deployed, but either way the pressure is the same.
 

MoInEd

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Edmonton, AB
Sorry - I didn't see your question until just now. They are telling you its ok to sit or stand in the slideout when it is deployed and dangling in the air, but not when it is retracted. How is one OK and not the other?

Slide mechanism vary, so it's hard to give a simplistic answer. Some slides have rollers or skid blocks underneath and any weight on the retracted slide actually rests on the floor underneath. Others are floating, with the slide supported only where it passes thru the sidewall, but that support is the same as when it is deployed. It is cantilevered, with the pivot point at the floor under the sidewall and the horizontal forces pushing against the sidewall. The force is on the outside of the wall pushing inward when the slide is retracted, and on the inside pushing outward when the slide is deployed, but either way the pressure is the same.

Sorry - I didn't see your question until just now. They are telling you its ok to sit or stand in the slideout when it is deployed and dangling in the air, but not when it is retracted. How is one OK and not the other?

Slide mechanism vary, so it's hard to give a simplistic answer. Some slides have rollers or skid blocks underneath and any weight on the retracted slide actually rests on the floor underneath. Others are floating, with the slide supported only where it passes thru the sidewall, but that support is the same as when it is deployed. It is cantilevered, with the pivot point at the floor under the sidewall and the horizontal forces pushing against the sidewall. The force is on the outside of the wall pushing inward when the slide is retracted, and on the inside pushing outward when the slide is deployed, but either way the pressure is the same.
I think it is not the same situation when fully extended vs. fully retracted. Usually when extended the "box" of the slide is half outside the trailer wall and half inside, so the weight of the silde room is more or less balaced. In the fully retracted position one side of the room is flush with the trailer wall and the whole room is overhanging inside. Putting any extra downward force will have a significantly more torque applied to the connection at the side of the trailer (e.g. for slide systems that are inside the trailer walls such as schwintek).
 
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