Need advice on washer/dryers

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jackbetsy

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We are looking at washer/dryers for our new 5er and need some advice. Stackables? Washer/dryer all in ones?  Pros and cons? Thanks...you guys are great!
 

Ned

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Our choice is the laundromat and get more storage space :)  Others have different opinions and will undoubtedly express them.
 

Tom

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We use the Spendide combination washer/dryer in our coach and on our boat. It deals with most of our needs, but is limited in volume. That usually means several loads rather than one big one. Large towel loads are all but impossible. If we had room and weight capacity, a pair of large stackables would be preferable. Of course, you really need a full hookup to be able to do a lot of laundry on board.

A number of folks use laundromats, but we prefer not to. We have friends who chose to use the space for a closet rather than a washer/dryer. Just different strokes for different folks.
 

Shayne

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Wehave a Bendix W/D in our Pace and have used it a great deal.  We save the big and filthy stuff for the laundramats. Had a stackable in a condo and both work for the RV  we prefer the all-in-one.  Just our version, everyone has their own ideas of what works for them.
 

Alaskansnowbirds

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jackbetsy said:
We are looking at washer/dryers for our new 5er and need some advice. Stackables? Washer/dryer all in ones?  Pros and cons? Thanks...you guys are great!

We have an all in one. One caution with the all in one. If you go with the all in one make sure you get a VENTED one. They make both vented and non-vented models. We like having the W/D on board, we don't like laundromats. But some people like Fords and some like Chevys. It's a personal thing what you like. We like our all in one but it is a non-vented one and takes a very long time to dry.
 

Tom

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Good point re the vented vs non-vented option Don.
 

Smoky

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Like Tom, we use the vented Splendide combo.  We love it!

Splendide specializes in these types of washer dryers and they are a very good company making a very good product.  I think they might be an Italian company but not sure about that.

It is true you have to use smaller loads, and the drying time is longer.  But we don't mind that at all.  Sure beats trekking down to the laundry room.  We do other things, while the Splendide is doing its job.  We have Splendided our laundry for two years now and have not had the hint of any problem.
 

Tom

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Smoky said:
I think they might be an Italian company but not sure about that.

That's where the design was originally conceived - by a company called Indesit, the same company that 'invented' the skinny refridgerator (less insulation). We used to have one of their combo W/D machines at home in the 60's, when we lived in the UK.
 

Barb

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I had a Splende 2000S in my 5'er.  I loved it.  A couple of things to think about.  Weight, water, power, and convince.

Weight - an all in one weights less than a stackable, and takes up less storage room.  Make sure you can afford the extra king pin weight.

Water - uses less water than a machine made for a stick house.

Power - One really needs 50A for a washer of any kind.  30A will work on an all in one, but one has to be careful of not using too many electrical appliances at one time. 

Convince -  It takes a while to learn how to use an rv washer.  One  can wash and dry a set of queen sheets, but you can only do 3 pairs of jeans at a time.  They do not work like your machine at home.  For best results use a laundry soap designed for front loading machines.  I use cheer.  1 to 2 Tablespoons.  And about a teaspoon for fabric softener.  The timer to me,  is my favorite feature.  I load and set my machine in the morning.  Go and do whatever, and it starts on its own.  Later in the evening, I fold or hang up.  And I'm done.  A small load everyday works for me.  Also by doing laundry on board, one doesn't have to go out on yucky raining night, or beautiful sunny day, cause you have no clean clothes. Also, you don't have to store dirty clothes, until you get to a laundry mat.  But one still has to go to a laundry mat for washing quilts/blankets, and rugs. 

Be aware that some RV parks in AZ, do not want you to use bleach or your on board machine.

I hope this helps to give you a better idea of what's involved using an RV washer.

Barb
 

Karl

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I also have a Splendide vented w/d combo and wouldn't be without it. Being single (my cat, Hercule, the Attack Cat doesn't go through a lot of clothes), it may seem a little extravagant, but I wouldn't give up the convenience for anything. Mostly I use the washer and hang the clothes outside to dry (love the fresh smell), but it sure beats having to pack up,drive, wait in line for machines, etc.

Mentioned, but not explained, was the difference between vented and non-vented. A non-vented drier uses heat to evaporate the water from the clothes, then uses cold water to condense the moisture and carry it out the drain pipe. They use MUCH more water than a vented model and are not well suited for use in locations where water availability is an issue. They also don't get clothes completely dry, so you need to lay them out for a while to let the residual moisture evaporate before putting them away.
 

GaryB

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I thought I read somewhere that there are really two types of stackable units - one is called a "stakpak" and the other is a 2-piece stackable unit.  Does anybody know the pros/cons of each, other than the first one is one single unit whereas the second one sounds like it's two units stacked on top of each other?

Gary
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Yes, there are the two types of stackables GaryB mentioned. The stackpak single unit is more space efficient while the two unit stackables are simply an option arrangement of a standard washer & dryer set. Sometimes they stack directly and sometimes you have to buy a bracket or bridge to support the upper one.  Both are available in several load sizes and price ranges and I don't think there is any material difference in washing & drying capability if you compare apples to apples among models.

In my opinion the stackpak is a far superior washer & dryer vs the front loading combination, but you have to have the space (and possibly weight capacity)  to handle it. The stackpak will wash and dry like you are used to at home, though you may choose a smaller size than you are accustomed to. The combo units are a different animal, as others have already advised.
 

ArdraF

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After years of going the laundromat route, I absolutely LOVE my Splendide (yes, it is made in Italy) all-in-one.  It was a primary criterion when we got this motorhome.  And my husband loves it even more because he no longer has to wait around for me while the clothes wash and dry (not all commercial laundromats are in good neighborhoods).  It does its thing while we enjoy doing other things.  I love that it washes and dries without attention from me.  Now, it would be perfect if they would invent one that also folds the clothes for me!  :D

By the way, a quirky side note.  Jerry's uncle opened the world's first laundromat in Palo Alto, California in 1946.  It had the old front loader rounded Bendix washers.  Too bad he didn't stick with it and start a chain - he would have been a millionaire!

ArdraF
 

jackbetsy

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Thanks for all the good advice! Now, just one more question....where do you get the Splendide units? We don't have a Camping World close ...Sears, Penneys, etc. have never heard of them...are they only available at Camping World?
 

thebrits

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We have Sears stackables in our fiver.  We had a Splendide in the previous one.  Both options are good.  The benefit of the stackable is that you can be drying one load while washing another - quite a time saver sometimes.  When we had the Splendide we just did a small wash every day.  Either option beats the laundramat for us.



 

Tom

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Good point about the time saving factor of a stackable Peggy.
 

thebrits

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I've run it on 30amp, but you have to watch that not much else is on.  I usually turn off the water heater before turning on the dryer, for example.  A few trips out to the breaker box makes for a farily short learning curve.  It also broadens the vocabulary&%[email protected]@
 

Karl

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Splendide is available through most RV dealers/repair facilities. PPL motorhomes is one source. Just Google Splendide. My rig is 30A and there is a switch that lets you use either the microwave or the washer/dryer, but not both at the same time. It's the drying cycle that uses a lot of electricity; not the wash cycle. Running an a/c unit along with the dryer might be a problem, but otherwise 30A will do nicely.
 

ArdraF

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We use our Splendide on 30 amp without any problems.  We just make sure all the other power hogs are turned off first.  ;D ;D  The key is power management.  We also run both of our A/Cs on 30 amp by turning off the Aqua Hot (hot water system) and refrigerator first.  Initially we didn't think we'd be able to run both A/Cs on 30 amp, but it's worked pretty well.  Jerry went through all our power plugs and determined which items used the most electricity, such as the refrigerator, air conditioners, microwave, and electric water heater.  This helped us figure out what we can run simultaneously on 30 amp.

ArdraF
 
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