need help leveling

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

PattyShipc

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2021
Posts
72
Location
Fort Collins, CO
I am almost ready to get my new-to-me rig on the road! I'm plugging in at home to cool the refrig. To get close enough to my home I am on a slope in my driveway. I kinda got it, though I'm not sure if I am level enough for the frig. Since I will be doing this multiple times I thought I would ask for advice.

What tricks do you employ when you have to level on a slightly challenging surface? Right now I am on 5 blocks...about 5 inches. I do this without help so I am looking for the most efficient and easiest way to get er done.
Ant tips? Thanks - Patty
 

donn

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 8, 2009
Posts
4,497
Typical RV refer likes to be less than 5 degrees out. That aint much. To check where your at now go buy a 6 inch macine level, put it in the freezer and check both front to back and side to side. Half a bubble yoir good. Once your level next step, place the level on your gas stove burner grate to verify it matches the refer. From now on place the level on the stove and get it as close to ideal as possible.
 

PattyShipc

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 5, 2021
Posts
72
Location
Fort Collins, CO
Never mind. I did some research, read some old posts. Don't think there'sanything new out there
Typical RV refer likes to be less than 5 degrees out. That aint much. To check where your at now go buy a 6 inch macine level, put it in the freezer and check both front to back and side to side. Half a bubble yoir good. Once your level next step, place the level on your gas stove burner grate to verify it matches the refer. From now on place the level on the stove and get it as close to ideal as possible.
I like that, and I already have the 6" bubble level. I was wondering when close is close enough, and your reply was helpful Thanks!
 

John From Detroit

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 12, 2005
Posts
24,954
Location
Davison Michigan
When the hydraulics failed on my RV I used multiple "Tricks" one was a set of steps.. How high you can make this depends on two things. Ground clearance of the rig and your strength.

Mine were made of 2x12
1foot
Two feet
And a full yard long
Arranged like that. I would recommend a longer by six inches on all steps and a 4x4 stop on top of the top board to help prvent OPPS I overshot.

There are ways to make those steps so you only need to wrangle one slab at a time but that can cause issues too.

Mine were simply glued and "Clamped" over night (The clamp... I jacked up my car and set it down on the top slab)
 

FunSteak

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 24, 2013
Posts
537
Location
NE Illinois
I've mentioned it before, but adding a Level Mate Pro to our kit was hands-down the best thing we've done. Level Mate Pro

If you don't mind the roughly $130 investment, it will change how you level immediately. We don't have jacks on our rig - just use the yellow blocks. I've had that thing perfectly level in some really challenging situations, as much as 12" of blocks more than a couple of times. Even in those situations, it's rare it takes me more than one or two attempts to get perfect.

Since the feedback is in real time, you can also jockey around your site to find the best, most level spot, and then you know exactly how many blocks you need at each wheel. It's, in a word, fantastic!

I cannot recommend this thing enough if you've ever struggled to level, even just a time or two. It really is a game changer.
 

xrated

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 24, 2016
Posts
1,088
Location
"Murvil", E. TN.
I've mentioned it before, but adding a Level Mate Pro to our kit was hands-down the best thing we've done. Level Mate Pro

If you don't mind the roughly $130 investment, it will change how you level immediately. We don't have jacks on our rig - just use the yellow blocks. I've had that thing perfectly level in some really challenging situations, as much as 12" of blocks more than a couple of times. Even in those situations, it's rare it takes me more than one or two attempts to get perfect.

Since the feedback is in real time, you can also jockey around your site to find the best, most level spot, and then you know exactly how many blocks you need at each wheel. It's, in a word, fantastic!

I cannot recommend this thing enough if you've ever struggled to level, even just a time or two. It really is a game changer.
I'm going to agree with you on the LevelMate Pro.....100%. I had one on the previous trailer, a tow behind Toy Hauler and when it comes time to level the trailer, using the L.M. Pro is almost like cheating.....except, in a very good way! When you combine the L.M. Pro with a set of the Anderson levelling wedges.....it's so easy that you will never do it any other way.....unless of course your get a different trailer, like I did, that has the Lippert 6 point hydraulic levelling with the auto level function. And of course, with the L.M Pro, you also have a "hitch height" function that will show you exactly where your hitch height needs to be, before backing your truck up to the trailer for hookup. All in all, one of the best accessories I ever purchased when I had the previous trailer that did not have automatic leveling.
 

Sooeycute

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 16, 2021
Posts
81
Location
Florida
Now this is for a 5th wheel or travel trailer.. I use a 4' builders level. Not a technique I use for just an overnight stay. Pretty quick though.

Front to back shouldn't be any problem for anyone.

Side to side. I carry 2 8' 2x10's and an 8' straight 2x4. Pick the spot where your wheels will be and check with the level. Use the 2x4 to bridge between the 2 tire locations. Low side gets a 2x10. Check it and see if it needs another one. Should get you pretty close. Stagger the ends of the boards and just pull forward onto them.

If you get a muddy site you will be glad you have those 2x10's
 

Ex-Calif

Well-known member
Joined
May 15, 2020
Posts
1,547
You will learn "how level is level" with some experience.

My aircon will drip into the RV if the RV is nose down. I don't really worry about the fridge "too" much.

I have groovy leveling bubbles I have not yet mounted. My "trick" right now is that I have a small rubber ball. I put it on the kitchen counter and I want it to naturally roll slowly to the left and rearward. Nose high and most water shedding off the roof going to the non-entry door side.

I can also stand in the center aisle, turn around and walk aft and if the RV is not level, I will feel off balance - LOL... It's a feel thing.

Another indicator that I am not right is that I open the entry door 80 degrees from the RV. If the door swings forward I am nose low.

I have also noticed that if my leveling is "off" the head door will not latch due to some influence of twisting on the frame.

Not to say scientific leveling aids aren't the best idea. But for me super flat level is not my goal. I "want" my RV a little nose high and left low.
 

Ray-IN

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 16, 2014
Posts
302
Location
North America-somewhere
Norcold states their refrigerators will operate efficiently when they are within 6° front-to-back and 3° side-to-side; while looking at the fridge doors.
The rule of thumb is; if you are comfortable living in the RV it is likely level enough for the fridge.
re: levels. Download the free phone app. "Clinometer" it is much easier to use than a bubble level and very accurate.
 
Top Bottom