Need Some Guidance -- Class A Vs. Class C

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Isaac-1

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Back to the original question, Class C's feel more like driving a conventional van, as they are built on a van chassis, and have a van cockpit area. The downside is that it is easy to forget how tall and wide you are particularly if you have experience driving a standard van. With a Class A, you are sitting higher up, further outboard, and further forward as relates to the front axle, so that it is much harder to forget how tall and wide the coach is compared to being in a class C. After a few days driving the class A you will tend to adjust to the new view point, at which point performance differences will tend to be minimal, all else being equal.

As to sleeping area layout, etc. it is true that Class A's tend to be designed to sleep 2 people, and Class C's tend to be designed to sleep a family of 5-7 by turning every potential bit of space into a bed, at the expense of bathroom, kitchen, etc. areas. There are plenty of exceptions to this rule out there, and you just have to find the one that works for you.
 

SeilerBird

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I have owned several As and several Cs and a bunch of Bs in my lifetime. The first A I owned had a drivers door and I hated it. Never used it once to get in and out of the RV. My next two As did not have a drivers door.

I think you should rent a few RVs and see for yourself.Tom 2009-16.jpg
 

DonTom

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The first A I owned had a drivers door and I hated it. Never used it once to get in and out of the RV.
Well, I am glad to know that I am not missing much with my new Class A by not having a driver's door.

But at least you have a choice to use it or not.

-Don- Reno, NV
 

Rob&Deryl

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Not mentioned is DP doesn’t have a front to back drive shaft so there can be huge side to side storage between the wheels. They also tend to have large payload numbers so you can take the kitchen sink if you want :)
 

SeilerBird

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Well, I am glad to know that I am not missing much with my new Class A by not having a driver's door.

But at least you have a choice to use it or not.

-Don- Reno, NV
You also rid the vehicle of another place for heat and cold to escape from and protection from heat and cold getting into the RV. I chose to never use the door.
 

Leebird

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I grew up with a Class C then Dad migrated to a Class A. We inherited his 2011 Class A Gas and treasured it, upgraded to a 2021 Red and love it. I could live in it full time and be happy camper. Bless my Dad for all he taught me. I like the spaciousness of a Class A and the storage is awesome we bring our rug and grill and favorite chairs. Washer/Dryer and cozy FP. ❤️Enjoy you will love camping or glamping 😂
 

Ken & Sheila

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My first RV, a 94 Holiday Imperial Diesel had a drivers door. Coach door was mid side. I never used the driver's door expect on one leg of our 1998 Alaskan Ferry trip. I was parked so close on the pass side that I could easily get out the door so I exited thru the drivers door. Ferry personal offered to fix the situation but I said I was OK.
The door was a source of cold air.
 

NY_Dutch

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Our drivers side door seals well with no noticeable air leaks. I do use it from time to time for access when refueling or easy access to the firewall mounted fuse box. I don't consider the lack of a drivers door a deal killer when looking at motorhomes, but I have found it useful since it's there.
 

Lou Schneider

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The biggest drawback I see to a Crass A is the safety of the driving and passenger positions. That big glass window may be nice to look through but it provides zero protection in an accident and when you're parked it's a huge thermal leak, letting in heat in the summer and cold in the winter. Class A's are also notorious for the cab disintegrating in a collision with overhead cabinets and TVs falling down as the ceiling disintegrates in an accident.

A Class C has a crash resistant cab, at least on the sides that haven't been cut away by the motorhome manufacturer.
 

Rob&Deryl

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The biggest drawback I see to a Crass A is the safety of the driving and passenger positions. That big glass window may be nice to look through but it provides zero protection in an accident and when you're parked it's a huge thermal leak, letting in heat in the summer and cold in the winter. Class A's are also notorious for the cab disintegrating in a collision with overhead cabinets and TVs falling down as the ceiling disintegrates in an accident.

A Class C has a crash resistant cab, at least on the sides that haven't been cut away by the motorhome manufacturer.
They don’t cut the cab. The truck manufacturers make it that way. The cabinets in a class C are coming forward too in a front end crash.
 

Lou Schneider

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They don’t cut the cab. The truck manufacturers make it that way. The cabinets in a class C are coming forward too in a front end crash.
True about the truck makers making a cutoff cab but more of the cab's roof is removed if there is stand-up access to the front seats. Trivia - being able to get into the front seat from a standing position was originally an FMCA eligibility requirement to keep Class Cs and pickup campers out.
 

Isaac-1

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It really depends on the type of accident, personally I would prefer to be in a class A and sitting up much higher for most typical 2 vehicle accidents, running into a concrete piling or hitting an 18 wheeler head on and it is going to be bad no matter what you are in.
 

ChasA

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One thing I like about class As is if it's 🌧️ and you're on a highway with a lot of traffic, you can see above all the road spray.
 
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