New & Confused

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Utclmjmpr

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Cedar City, UT
To farther confuse you, it gets deeper than that , example: Ex Cal. mentioned Winnebago and Itasca, both built along side one another because Winne owns Itasca,! ( and recently discontinued Itasca) >>>Dan
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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At our Silver Springs FL home
My 2 cent for you depending what length you looking for 35' to 40' maybe. The problem is anything over 35' will not fit in most US camp grounds. Some do have room for larger or longer RV's. I have a 37' with 3 slides and 2 baths. Wanted to go to a couple of State beaches but they max out at 35'. Good Luck and have fun shopping
I think that is a gross exaggeration. Some older parks were laid out when the average RV was under 35 ft, but the majority of RV parks can accommodate 35-40 ft. We traveled in a 40 footer for 12 years and always found places to stay. Of course, in a big rig we were choosing parks with full hook-up sites, not rustic sites. Maybe it depends on what you are looking for.
 

Mark_K5LXP

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Albuquerque, NM
Right, "camping" vs "parks". Most parks I've seen are a slam dunk with wide turns and pull through or easy back in sites. The campgrounds I like to go to are pushing it with just my 30 footer, have the tree branch scrapes on the sides and pine needles stuck in the A/C unit to prove it.

Mark B.
Albuquerque, NM
 

Britali

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Mar 3, 2021
Posts
14
Location
Oklahoma
Thank you all! I knew you would provide loads of wisdom & invaluable insight!

It looks like class C may not work as far as cargo capacity. I am ok up’ing my budget if worth it...just paranoid about an expensive yard decoration lol. It is a new concept to me to not base my purchase on reliability & service...but I have been eduacated on how that does not apply in the RV world. Still I would like to be as smart as I can be, even if that may not matter lol. I can deal with the drawbacks if I am realistically prepared (which you guys are preparing me for).

Have any of you bought an IWS super class C? His video provided a lot of information & even if I do not buy from him, makes me steer towards super C’s and willing to put more out there for longevity. But it “looks” like they provide great service to so would like to hear from anyone that has experience with them.

This is the video. I found it insightful & helpful on many things. But I am a noob lol!


Are those realistic observations & facts? Or just dealer sales manipulations? I felt more educated after watching but could just be my noobiness lol.

Again thank you everyone!
 

Britali

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Location
Oklahoma
Based on your first post it seems you'd like a turnkey solution that meets 90% of your desires.

For me the research goes something like this.

1 - Look at some new class As, Class Cs and Super Cs - Definitely decide what you are after. If I don't narrow it down I will get stuck with too many variables.
2 - Pay attention to floor plan, floor plan, floor plan

Bottom line for you is probably a 3-5 year old super C. But that's just an opinion.
Totally agree! Narrowing it down will help with focus and avoid becoming lost. Which I am trying to do. Can I expect to meet 90% of my wants turnkey realistically?

Once I narrow it down was gonna look at floor plan because if I do not narrow down, there is an endless amount of floor plans to check out it seems.

From all the wise advice here, it does seem like super C is the category I need to pursue & reg class C was not going to carry enough.

Just so all know... I only have one son I need to consider. Extra was for company.
 

Ex-Calif

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May 15, 2020
Posts
1,774
For company you need to consider things differently than a lake house or a home. It may be prudent to have a "guest" room in a cabin or house. I decided that I could not consider having a space that may get used a couple/few times a year.

The RV technically has 6 berths. I've had 5 people (adults) on board. When we do that it is basically a camping mind set. No better privacy or space than a 6 person tent - everyone better be pretty good friends. I consider my 32 foot space is barely enough for 2 adults full time. The drivers station is basically useless when parked and that's about 5 feet from windshield to behind the seats.

If I really decided I needed two private spaces (kids or visitors) I would seriously go bunkhouse travel trailer. If I was going to live long term with more than 2 people, slide outs would probably be mandatory for me.
 

SeilerBird

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Feb 25, 2012
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St Cloud Florida USA
I think that is a gross exaggeration. Some older parks were laid out when the average RV was under 35 ft, but the majority of RV parks can accommodate 35-40 ft. We traveled in a 40 footer for 12 years and always found places to stay. Of course, in a big rig we were choosing parks with full hook-up sites, not rustic sites. Maybe it depends on what you are looking for.
I agree with Gary. When I was traveling in a 39 foot DP we never had any problems finding a space in an NP. Most of the NPs have RV parks very close to the entrance with long sites.
 

Britali

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Posts
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Location
Oklahoma
If I really decided I needed two private spaces (kids or visitors) I would seriously go bunkhouse
I just figured he could sleep over driver area in most class c or super c. Just needed some kind of door that was better than the fabric mesh that my big arse dog could tear through (she is expensive since a trailer without her would be cheaper lol)...pocket door or true door was cool not just for “parent privacy” but big-honking-dog-proof.
 

Ex-Calif

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May 15, 2020
Posts
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Yes the overhead bunk is a good feature of the Cs and Super Cs.

You reminded me of a funny story. My niece and I were tent camping in a 4 man tent. In the middle of the night her (very active) dog too off at full speed from her bedroll, across my chest and stomach straight into the zip fly door. He hit the door so hard near the top the entire tent rolled on it's side, but the door held.

Completely dark, tent upside down, paw scratches on my chest and stomach, my niece piled on top of me and the dog still freaking out, I had no idea what they heck was going on. As we figured out the mess I realized that racoons were coming out of the woods and getting into the food. As an "urban" dog Sherlock freaked out when he saw them.

I thought I had done a good job securing the food. Raccoons may not be smart but they figure dout the latches to the 4 foot long cooler and had also climbed the tree and actually bit through the para-cord hanging the food bag. I ended up having to put everything in the Jeep but then had dreams of raccoons with slim jims breaking into the Jeep - LOL...
 

Koodog

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Dec 14, 2009
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465
Location
Boncarbo, CO
Wisdom usually comes from experience. Utilize what these fine folks are telling you. Rent 1 first. Try it out. Go to many RV shows and take in the experience. Your options are many. I know your terribly excited to get into RVing, but use just a bit of caution. Myself, I've bought 2 brand new RV's, and several used. I will never buy new again for the exact reasons folks have mentioned. I'm on my 4th used one and all have been great buys. None have ever been in a shop for service. I've not ever purchased a class C as I've found class A's to be a far better option for me. I currently have 2 class A's (a diesel and a gasser) and a TT. All have there pros and cons which I've discovered by trail and error. Make shopping for an RV and adventure and enjoy the journey. You'll be very glad you did in the end.
 

Mark_K5LXP

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Nov 17, 2018
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Albuquerque, NM
When we first ventured into the RV world, DW had visions of norman rockwell family gatherings in the RV. Gotta have the sleeper sofa, convertible dinette, lots of seating and storage because of all the company we would have. Fast forward a few years and thankfully that illusion has shifted to making us comfortable and not the throngs of virtual guests that never materialized (the perpetually vacant guest bedrooms in the house is a separate issue...). The few times we have brought anyone along we've made it work with what we have, and they know what they're in for up front. When it's the grandkids they are far less discriminating with sleeping arrangements than the adults. So upshot of this is only consider who will be actually residing in the RV with less priority given to what-if or maybe guests. The costs and complexity increases exponentially and this is for your personal use, not anyone else's.

Mark B.
Albuquerque, NM
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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I think your desire for comfortable living space, big shower, cargo capacity and such pretty well rules out a regular C. You are in Super-C or Class A territory. You can get both in your budget range, but they are admittedly low-end models. My personal choice would be a pre-owned, higher end model. I don't see any advantage in the Super-C over the A either, but floor plans tend to differ and a C may have features you like, e.g. a cab-over bed (not all have beds up there).

Does it have to be diesel-power? You can cut the price a bunch with a gas-powered chassis in a Class A. The diesel class rigs tend to be higher in reliability & features, but mostly because they are higher priced models to begin with. There's nothing inherently wrong with the reliability of a gas-chassis coach.

You referenced the IWS super-C, but IWS is a dealer, not a manufacturer. They are pushing what they sell, which is the Renegade and ShowHauler product line. I'm not knocking IWS as a source of product or info; just want to make sure you are applying the right yardstick when you measure their advice.
 
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scottydl

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Land of Lincoln
Outstanding advice above, covers almost everything I would have said. If I was spending $150k I would be in the market for a NICE used diesel pusher (Class A)... they are built on more solid frames, have the highest weight/towing capacities, and are generally more robust and built from higher quality materials (both interior and exterior). I know you said you want new and don't care about depreciation, but be aware that a new $150k gas RV might be worth about $50k in 5 years. These rigs drop like a rock for the first few years especially, then values start to level out.

This was mentioned, but you should also be aware that RV life involves being willing to "tinker" ... or plan to have the rig in the shop a LOT for little stuff that goes wrong along the way. Even under warranty, RV repair waits can be weeks or months if a factory-made piece has to be ordered (for instance). You can't buy your way out of this reality of RVing.

That said, I paid $12k for our first RV (a 35' gas Class A, 13 years old at the time) and around $10k for our 2nd/current RV (a 32' bunkhouse trailer, 7 years old at the time) and both have been awesome for our family. I've had fairly minimal maintenance/repair costs along the way, i.e. the RV lifestyle can be nicely done without spending a ton of cash. I did a TON of research and shopping before buying either of them, and knew what I wanted/needed so I could jump when I found "the one". Both came from private sellers, as I detest dealerships for the most part... unfortunately they will not give you the post-purchase assurance that you are hoping for.
 

CJAG

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Joined
Oct 18, 2018
Posts
101
Location
Hendersonville, TN
You might consider a Super Class C which are bigger than the Class C and usually have more cargo capacity. My dream Super C would be the Nexus Ghost, but it's very expensive. Don't know what your budge is, but here's a 2016 Ghost near me which is pretty cheap at $109,995 and has a king size bed. https://www.rvtrader.com/listing/2016-Nexus-Rv-Ghost-36DS-5014581352

This is a pic of a 2021
View attachment 144414

Thank you all! I knew you would provide loads of wisdom & invaluable insight!

It looks like class C may not work as far as cargo capacity. I am ok up’ing my budget if worth it...just paranoid about an expensive yard decoration lol. It is a new concept to me to not base my purchase on reliability & service...but I have been eduacated on how that does not apply in the RV world. Still I would like to be as smart as I can be, even if that may not matter lol. I can deal with the drawbacks if I am realistically prepared (which you guys are preparing me for).

Have any of you bought an IWS super class C? His video provided a lot of information & even if I do not buy from him, makes me steer towards super C’s and willing to put more out there for longevity. But it “looks” like they provide great service to so would like to hear from anyone that has experience with them.

This is the video. I found it insightful & helpful on many things. But I am a noob lol!


Are those realistic observations & facts? Or just dealer sales manipulations? I felt more educated after watching but could just be my noobiness lol.

Again thank you everyone!
Our good friends have a Super C. They just bought their second one a Enterga Accolade after saying the Nexus they owned had too many problems. We are considering this option as well. My friend is a mechanic and says " One of the benefits of a Super C is truck stops will work on them."
Any one here agree that the Super C is easier to find a mechanic? Also are mobile mechanics fairly easy to find when traveling?
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Feb 2, 2005
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74,578
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At our Silver Springs FL home
Remember there are two different types of mechanic skills involved, whether mobile or fixed. One skill set works on the chassis (truck) part while the other does the RV "house" part. Rarely will one do both, though an RV house tech might do a simple chassis item as a favor.

Most areas have mobile truck mechanics but you have to search around, both online and phone calls to nearby truck repair shops. Mobile RV techs exist wherever RVs are common - asking at a campground office often finds them. Google is your friendly helper as well.
 

WILDEBILL308

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May 6, 2012
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3,066
Location
FORT WORTH TEXAS
Let me jump in with a couple of comments. I think the gas coach that Seiler Bird linked to is a steal. Newmar is a top tier maker and that is a nice gas coach. Well within your budget and leave you room to customize.
Also you don't have a lot tied up if it is yard art.
Look at this one it is a diesel pusher with air bag suspension and Newmar Comfort drive to make it easier to drive in wind and adverse conditions. and in your price range.
Listen to what Gary RV_Wizard and SeilerBird said about acess to places to stay. I Have also traveled extensively and I have never not found a place to stay at or near to what I want to do or see. That is why you take a towed with you. Most of the time it isn't the size of your RV that limits you but the size of the crowd where you are going. This last weekend we have been down at Lake Buchanan Texas. I don't care if you walk up with a back pack there are no openings. (Spring Break)
I don't recommend the super C because well most don't have a good airbag ride at your price point.
Any questions just ask.
Bill
 
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