New Shore Power Receptacle Install Question

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Vibe101

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Mar 13, 2022
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Arizona
Hi All.

Does anyone have any experience installing shore power receptacles?

I want to move my trailer parking pad about 20 feet away from its current location and to make the move clean and safe I am also going to move the shore power and water connections out to the new pad.

Currently (pun not intended) there is a 50 amp RV receptacle box mounted to the outer side wall of my steel building and it is fed by the four red/green/white/black wires that are routed from the inside of the building through metal conduit that is inserted horizontally through the side wall outside to the steel box where the receptacle is installed as per code.

I want to decommission that receptacle so I can extend the wires outside underground to a newly installed pedestal about 20 feet away...in other words I need to open the existing metal box, eliminate the receptacle and put a cover over the opening, run a conduit from the bottom of the existing box down the outside wall of the building and into the ground and then run it under ground out horizontal 20 feet, and then up the side of the newly installed "pedestal" (6x6 pressure treated post sticking out of the ground) to a new receptacle.

So the questions are:

-What method should I use to electrically connect the 4 wires at the side wall box to the new wires that are being run through the conduit to the new pedestal mounted receptacle?

-The travel trailer that will occupy my new trailer park is a 30 Amp unit so I presume I should run the four 50 Amp wires through the new underground conduit to the new new pedestal mounted receptacle so as to take advantage of the additional conductor?

-Regarding the new receptacle, should I go with a 50 Amp or a 30 Amp?
-If I install a 50 Amp receptacle to the new pedestal, I could plug in the trailer in using the typical 50 Amp to 30 Amp adapter plug...or...
-Should I install a 30 Amp receptacle at the new pedestal so as to limit the current draw considering the the additional 30-ish feet of wire resistance?
-If I went with a 30 Amp receptacle, then how would I connect the 4 wires to the 3 wire 30 Amp plug?

-What is an economical conduit for the underground run that is appropriate for the exposed sections (down steel building wall and up pedestal)?
-How deep does conduit need to be buried?
-What diameter conduit should I use?

-Where is a good source to procure the plastic pink flamingos, tiki torches, and rolled out fake grass required to amplify the tackiness of my new trailer park?

Sorry for the slightly off topic question however you all are the smartest people I know on any subject so I'm sure there is someone on this list who used to do this work and could provide some "if it were me I would..." statements.

Thanks for your help!!!

Bill
 

HueyPilotVN

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This will not answer all your questions but it is a start.

 

Kirk

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-If I went with a 30 Amp receptacle, then how would I connect the 4 wires to the 3 wire 30 Amp plug?
You do not. A 30A outlet only has 1 hot lead while your 50A outlet has 2, known as L1 and L2. Each of those comes from a different bus bar in the 120V distribution panel and they are supplied by a double breaker. A properly wired 30A outlet uses either L1 or L2 but not both and it is supplied by a single breaker at the distribution box.
ItemImage-505757-q5w9hc-exbn54-eetdos.jpg


siemens-double-pole-breakers-q250u-c3_600.jpg
 

Krazeehorse33

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Personally I think I would run a 50 amp receptacle and use an adapter. You won’t draw any more amps than your unit is capable of drawing. Then if you ever upgrade to a 50 amp rig you’re good to go.
 

Henry J Fate

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Use split bolt clamps at the existing box to connect the new wire available at the cheap houses. Plastic pipe buried below the frost line from the steel building old box to the new post also available at the cheap houses. Avoid an adapter by installing a 30 amp outlet at the new post but pull all the wires needed from the steel building existing box for a 50 amp plug for future consideration. Make appropriate changes to the ciruit protection at the steel building which will only need to be single 30 amp protection.

I would strongly suggest to get with someone who is experienced and licensed to design and implement the change.
 

John From Detroit

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First, before you do anyting open the box.. Many boxes have "Pass through" lugs so all you need to do is run the wires from there to the new outlet. Leave the old and that way you can use either one. This is safe as you don't change the breakers.
 

Ex-Calif

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I a pretty sure these are the wire connectors Henry is referencing as they are suitable for butt connections on AC circuits. You can get them at the big box places.

Butt Connectors

I personally don't like intermediate connections and would run new wire bundle but that's just me. Note that these are weather resistant not weatherproof and are not suitable for direct bury and should be used in and around the j-box inside.

I also would remain consistent and wire the new box as a 50 amp box. You already have a 50amp circuit breaker so why not. You can use a dogbone to draw 30 amps from the new pedestal.

However if the budget allows you might consider a 50/30/20 box which will cover everything but is more expensive. At a minimum you should consider a 50/20 so that you get a couple of 120V/20amp plug ins to run pressure washers or anything else you might need which would be independent of the RV.
 

Rob&Deryl

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I a pretty sure these are the wire connectors Henry is referencing as they are suitable for butt connections on AC circuits. You can get them at the big box places.

Butt Connectors

I personally don't like intermediate connections and would run new wire bundle but that's just me. Note that these are weather resistant not weatherproof and are not suitable for direct bury and should be used in and around the j-box inside.

I also would remain consistent and wire the new box as a 50 amp box. You already have a 50amp circuit breaker so why not. You can use a dogbone to draw 30 amps from the new pedestal.

However if the budget allows you might consider a 50/30/20 box which will cover everything but is more expensive. At a minimum you should consider a 50/20 so that you get a couple of 120V/20amp plug ins to run pressure washers or anything else you might need which would be independent of the RV.
Split bolts are as they sound. A 3/4” or so bolt 1.5“ long that has been cut most of the way lengthwise to remove a 1/4” channel.
Put the 2 wires in the channel and tighten the nut.
 

Larry N.

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I have an RV pedestal next to the pad where I keep my RV at home. It's nice, and there are even times when the 20 amp receptacle is handy for yard work.
 

DutchmenSport

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Instead of hooking up ONLY a 30 amp or ONLY a 50 amp, why not get a box that supports 20-30-50 amp and then you have the best of everything.

This is how I did ours, and it's been great having all 3 available plugs.


In fact, later after having it installed, we had installed an electric gate. The electrician put in a double throw breaker in place of the single 20 amp breaker in that box because, according to code, the electric gate had to be on it's own circuit breaker. So, they installed the double pole breaker there. That was a perfect way to bring out another electric line without having to get into my house wiring.


 
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Kirk

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Personally, I would install an RV outlet box that has 50A, 30A and 110V outlets and breakers in it.
I think he means 50A, 30A and a 15 0r 20A outlet. There are no 110V supplies in the USA as all of them changed to 120V back in the 1950's. The mandated standard has been 120V since 1984 in the USA.
 

Bobtop46

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I have installed 3 of these. Solves all your issues. Run 6/3 from the old box thru conduit (gray) to the new location. Take down the old box and put a 4x4" junction box where it was. Inside the junction box use the proper size DryConn wire nuts and tape them. You will need to upgrade your breaker in the box from 50 amp to 70 amp.
 

Vibe101

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Arizona
Hey all...I am back up for air after a bunch of other projects and an HOA meeting...

THANKS you all for the great advice.

OK so I will will stick with 50 AMP all the way...excellent advice!


>Many boxes have "Pass through" lugs so all you need to do is run the wires from there to the new outlet.

This is a great idea...but sadly my existing receptacle on the side of the building does not have the "pass through" capability because I can see that each lug will fit only one wire


>Personally, I would install an RV outlet box that has 50A, 30A and 110V outlets and breakers in it. That way you are ready to go no matter what cord you have. GE RV Panel with 50 Amp and 30 AMP RV Receptacles and a 20 Amp GFCI Receptacle GE1LU532SS

Also great idea!!!

Does the GE1LU532SS panel have the "pass through" capability?

I ask because due to your great advice the new plan is the following:

-Remove the existing 50 AMP receptacle and box and use that for the new location.
-Buy a new box that has pass through lugs and install that in the existing location.

Off to the big box store today to buy the electrical conduit and water/ sewage pipes.

THANKS for the advice!!!
 

CharlesinGA

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Your original plan was quite OK. Don't bother removing the old box, use it as you originally intended as a junction with a cover. Split bolts work wonderfully on heavier sizes such as #6. After tightening them, wrap the daylights out of them with electric tape (good 3M, not the cheap stuff) or use Scotch Rubber Mastic Tape. Split bolts are found in the box stores and electrical supply houses. If aluminum wire is involved, make sure the split bolts you buy are approved for AL and CU.

3LN31_AS01

I prefer the 20/30/50 panel at the end, its weather proof and provides anything you may need for now or in the future.

Charles
 

boatbuilder

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I think he means 50A, 30A and a 15 0r 20A outlet. There are no 110V supplies in the USA as all of them changed to 120V back in the 1950's. The mandated standard has been 120V since 1984 in the USA.
Yes, I did mean a 15 or 20A outlet. The box I referenced has a 20A GFCI. I think that is mandatory for an outside duplex outlet to have GFCI protection.
 
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