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Fcranger

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 15, 2006
Posts
125
Location
Northern Arizona
HI , I just got into RVing and joined your group to get some tips. We (my Wife and I) live in
northern Arizona, the weather here is nice most of the year but sometimes in the winter it get's down in the 20's, I was wondering if anybody has some tips on winter RVing, I have a Winnebago Aspect
we will probably use it sometimes  through the winter months here. I was thinking of using a small heater in the motorhome during the cold times to keep it warm enough to eliminate the use of antifreeze  in the water system is this a good or bad idea, I would put anitifreeze in the both gray and black holding tanks.
Frank and Mari-lynn
 

Tom

Administrator
Joined
Jan 13, 2005
Posts
48,619
Hi Frank and Mari-lynn. Welcome to our forum.

Hopefully some folks will jump in with some winterizing advice for you. Meanwhile, you might check to see if your basement is insulated and if it has basement heating to help prevent freezing down there, at least in the bays that hold the water system and tanks.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Posts
73,489
Location
At our Silver Springs FL home
A small electric heater is good, both for storage and for using the RV (assuming you will have shore power available). Many of us carry a 1000/1500 watt heater for chiily weather.  Open cabinet doors so that heat can more easly reach plumbing buried behind cabinets.  If you have a bay with water and sewer valves, a 75 watt light bulb there will keep it warm enough so it  won't freeze in 20-32 degree weather.  If your dump valves are exposed, consider wrapping them in some insulation or rags.

Use the pink "potable water" antifreeze, available in RV stores and many Walmarts. I's not onlysafe to drink, it won't damage ruber seals and such either.  Put some in the sink drains so the P-traps can't freeze. And if your fridge has an ice maker, remember that it has a water line too. It's often exposed in the outer wall, behind the outer grill cover.
 

Fcranger

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 15, 2006
Posts
125
Location
Northern Arizona
Thanks for the tips, I got a small ceramic heater and a couple of gallons of anitfreeze so I should be set for a while, it got down in the 30's the other night. :)
 

Ron

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Jan 29, 2005
Posts
18,082
Location
Home is where we park it
Welcome to the RV Forum.  Please look around the forum,  join in on any of the on going discussions, start new discussions, or ask questions. Looking forward to your participation here. Thanks for joining us
 

Carl L

Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
7,239
Location
west Los Angeles
Fcranger said:
The pink RV antifreeze is suppose to be safe even if you were to accidently drink it
so I guess it can't hurt anything.

Watch that!  From the Wikipedia article on anti-freeze:

Propylene glycol, on the other hand, is considerably less toxic and may be labelled as "non-toxic antifreeze". It is used as antifreeze where ethylene glycol would be inappropriate, such as in food-processing systems or in pipes in homes, as well as numerous other settings. It is also used in food, medicines, and cosmetics, often as a binding agent. Propylene glycol is "generally recognized as safe" by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in food. However, it should not be thought that propylene glycol based antifreeze is safe for consumption. In the event of accidental exposure emergency medical services should be contacted.

And in their article on propylene glycol:

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined propylene glycol to be "generally recognized as safe" for use in food, cosmetics, and medicines. Like ethylene glycol, propylene glycol affects the body's chemistry by increasing the amount of acid. Propylene glycol is metabolized into lactic acid, which occurs naturally as muscles are exercised, while ethylene glycol is metabolized into oxalic acid, which is toxic.

In short, it should be regarded as a thing that is ok in dilution but should not be considered as an aperitif.


 

woodartist

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 23, 2006
Posts
563
Location
Wandering the Old West
If you are going to use a light bulb for a heat source be very careful. Someone mentioned to use a wire guard ( trouble light), in another post. Better idea. There is a real fire danger using an unprotected light bulb....FYI
 

Fcranger

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 15, 2006
Posts
125
Location
Northern Arizona
Good thought even a small light bulb gets pretty hot, if it was lying on something plastic down there it could melt it and maybe catch fire. :(
 

blueblood

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 16, 2005
Posts
1,082
Carl Lundquist said:
Watch that!  From the Wikipedia article on anti-freeze:

Propylene glycol, on the other hand, is considerably less toxic and may be labelled as "non-toxic antifreeze". It is used as antifreeze where ethylene glycol would be inappropriate, such as in food-processing systems or in pipes in homes, as well as numerous other settings. It is also used in food, medicines, and cosmetics, often as a binding agent. Propylene glycol is "generally recognized as safe" by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in food. However, it should not be thought that propylene glycol based antifreeze is safe for consumption. In the event of accidental exposure emergency medical services should be contacted.

And in their article on propylene glycol:

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined propylene glycol to be "generally recognized as safe" for use in food, cosmetics, and medicines. Like ethylene glycol, propylene glycol affects the body's chemistry by increasing the amount of acid. Propylene glycol is metabolized into lactic acid, which occurs naturally as muscles are exercised, while ethylene glycol is metabolized into oxalic acid, which is toxic.

In short, it should be regarded as a thing that is ok in dilution but should not be considered as an aperitif.

It's likely most of us have drank PG in recent years if over 50. The solutions used for colonosopy come with nice names like Glycoax but are simply PG in some diluted form. My most recent exam (yesterday) called for mixing 24 oz of Gatorade with 255g of PG powder.  :'(
 
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