newbie tow questions-

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scale obsession

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I opted to make a new thread dedicated to this topic, after another member brought it to my attention that I may have bought a truck thats not rated for our intended TT purchase. 

I purchased a 2016 chevrolet silverado crew cab 4x4 5.3. Standard bed, 6 speed trans ,342 gears. The truck has a tow rating of 9100 lb, and a max GVW of 7200LB. The GCWR is 15,000lb. When I figure up the combined weight, I'm getting 13,894 LB. Leaving 1106 lb in reserve. All numbers are the max ratings, assuming we are fully loaded.

I thought I was in the clear, until another member made the comment, that there is absolutely no way they'd pull this unit, with my truck.

We are planning to purchased a rockwood 2509S.

Here are the specs on the TT.

hitch-694 lb.
uvw-5170 lb.
cargo-1524 lb.
exterior length 25' 9"
height 10' 11"
width 96"
43 gal.
30 gal.
30 gal.


So, I wanted to confirm with some people whom, have far more experience than myself if we need to change our purchase plans, or if we are good to continue with the plan? 
 

kdbgoat

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This was covered throughly on this topic:

http://www.rvforum.net/SMF_forum/index.php/topic,116017.msg1049434.html#msg1049434

Ask the member to state facts as to why your truck can't safely tow that trailer, and post them here.
 

scale obsession

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kdbgoat said:
This was covered throughly on this topic:

http://www.rvforum.net/SMF_forum/index.php/topic,116017.msg1049434.html#msg1049434

Ask the member to state facts as to why your truck can't safely tow that trailer, and post them here.

Says the safety margin is not large enough.
 

kdbgoat

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Good video Tom. Now take the numbers the OP provided, follow the video, and do the math.
 

grashley

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Here is my math:

TT GVWR is 6700#, so the hitch wt will be 700 - 800#.  Ad an 80# WD hitch and you should still have plenty of payload for passengers.  Check the yellow placard to see how much payload remains.

With the truck loaded to 7200# capacity, and adding a 6700# TT, minus the 700# hitch wt (included in both truck wt and TT wt), the GCW is only 13,200, well below the 15,000 GCWR.  The truck is heavier than the TT.

You already have the truck.  Ask for a test tow.  I think you will be fine unless you plan on lots of mountain towing.
 

brclark82

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Central IL
You?re leaving out the vehicles payload capacity.  There?s no way to know if your trucks over it?s max 7200lbs without knowing how much it weighs unloaded first (payload equals max weight - curb weight) It will be located on a sticker in the door and probably be around 1600-1700 on your truck but it?s impossible to know because it?s different based on very specific option your truck has.

Th hitch weight is for the unloaded trailer so maybe figure 800 to be safe that probably leaves you 800+ pounds for additional payload. Not sure how many people and stuff you will have in the truck but are more than likely fine.

I haven?t been around here long but have been towing large boats and enclosed trailers for many years and as long as you aren?t leaving out anything major are probably fine.  Make sure your brakes are in good condition.

From what I?ve seen if you?re around here long you?ll be hauling groceries with a one ton dually.
 

RGP

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The math guess is easy, but the truth is at the CAT scales.

Your truck has a sticker showing it max cargo limit. It is usually on the door jamb.

Before you buy the TT, load your truck with family, toys, camp gear and everything else it is going to have in it when you hook up to the TT.

Weigh it at the CAT scales. Then you know what your loaded truck weighs. The difference between that and maximum allowable vehicle weight is the amount of  "loaded for the road" tongue weight your TT can have.

Just as an example, my 5000 # dry weight TT crosses the scales at 6200 # when loaded for the road. It has 750 # on the tongue.  I suspect the 800# mentioned earlier will be close to your tongue weight or perhaps a bit more.

My rig is at my max cargo limit and has towed just fine all over the country. Others like a bit of margin in their weight limit to reduce wear and tear. 

Good Luck     
 

xrated

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brclark82 said:
You?re leaving out the vehicles payload capacity.  There?s no way to know if your trucks over it?s max 7200lbs without knowing how much it weighs unloaded first (payload equals max weight - curb weight) It will be located on a sticker in the door and probably be around 1600-1700 on your truck but it?s impossible to know because it?s different based on very specific option your truck has.

Th hitch weight is for the unloaded trailer so maybe figure 800 to be safe that probably leaves you 800+ pounds for additional payload. Not sure how many people and stuff you will have in the truck but are more than likely fine.

I haven?t been around here long but have been towing large boats and enclosed trailers for many years and as long as you aren?t leaving out anything major are probably fine.  Make sure your brakes are in good condition.

From what I?ve seen if you?re around here long you?ll be hauling groceries with a one ton dually.

I've used mine for that occasionally.......never went over the payload numbers yet!  ;D
 

scale obsession

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139
RGP said:
The math guess is easy, but the truth is at the CAT scales.

Your truck has a sticker showing it max cargo limit. It is usually on the door jamb.

Before you buy the TT, load your truck with family, toys, camp gear and everything else it is going to have in it when you hook up to the TT.

Weigh it at the CAT scales. Then you know what your loaded truck weighs. The difference between that and maximum allowable vehicle weight is the amount of  "loaded for the road" tongue weight your TT can have.

Just as an example, my 5000 # dry weight TT crosses the scales at 6200 # when loaded for the road. It has 750 # on the tongue.  I suspect the 800# mentioned earlier will be close to your tongue weight or perhaps a bit more.

My rig is at my max cargo limit and has towed just fine all over the country. Others like a bit of margin in their weight limit to reduce wear and tear. 

Good Luck   

Cargo weight is 1625. I'm going to do just that. Load it up and hit the scales. Thank you guys!
 

delavan

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Yes,

Going to the scale is enlightening. Dont forget that usually the numbers include a skinny 150 lbs driver (at least its how Ford does it). Firewood, tools, passagers, doggo if you have one or +. My oldie 1978 trailer has a GVW of 5600lbs and actually weights 4300 lbs loaded (minus water, which I wont use/fill).

Going to the cat scale is worth the 15 bucks!
 

kdbgoat

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Interesting reading on towing:

http://www.trucktrend.com/how-to/towing/1502-sae-j2807-tow-tests-the-standard/
 

RGP

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I like when these commercials show an F-150 hauling horses, logs, construction trailers and such. You notice that there is only the driver in the cab.

Yes my F-150 can tow a 9,500 lb. TT with 1,200 lbs. on the hitch; provided my wife, dog, tools and camp gears follow behind in another vehicle.  :) :)
 

grashley

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Western Kentucky
RGP said:
I like when these commercials show an F-150 hauling horses, logs, construction trailers and such. You notice that there is only the driver in the cab.

Yes my F-150 can tow a 9,500 lb. TT with 1,200 lbs. on the hitch; provided my wife, dog, tools and camp gears follow behind in another vehicle.  :) :)

YOU JUST EXPOSED THEIR SECRET!!  ;D
 

delavan

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grashley said:
YOU JUST EXPOSED THEIR SECRET!!  ;D

F-150 owner here! LOL. You need to know where to stop. a comfortable tow is not a maxed-out white knuckle ride...not fun, not safe.

Mine tows 9100lbs, with 1776lbs payload. Kid is living on her own and despise camping. I'm allergic to dogs lol. I got tools, the wife, firewood and many tackle boxes. Tongue weight is about 500 lbs.... ;D
I'm trying to lose weight, so I can bring one more day worth of firewood! lol.
 

longhaul

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I opted to make a new thread dedicated to this topic, after another member brought it to my attention that I may have bought a truck thats not rated for our intended TT purchase. 
  LOL....pretty typical opinion of a rv website.
Your math looks great. That truck will make a good match for that size trailer.

My wifes 2016 1500 crew cab short bed 5.3 engine 6 speed tranny has the same tow rating and a 1640 lb payload sticker which is just about all the trucks RAWR can handle.
When you weigh the truck be sure and get a separate  front axle and rear axle weight. A gross weight doesn't tell all the important tale of the combo.
Her trucks front axle scales at 3120 lbs and rear at 2340 lbs with me in the drivers seat. Yours will be similar.
 

scale obsession

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139
delavan said:
Yes,

Going to the scale is enlightening. Dont forget that usually the numbers include a skinny 150 lbs driver (at least its how Ford does it). Firewood, tools, passagers, doggo if you have one or +. My oldie 1978 trailer has a GVW of 5600lbs and actually weights 4300 lbs loaded (minus water, which I wont use/fill).

Going to the cat scale is worth the 15 bucks!

very enlightening, it was. Truck weighed in at 5900LB.
 

scale obsession

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Yes sir. Really should have gone 2500. Wish I knew what I know now, a month ago when I purchased the 1500.
 

gps42

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Apr 20, 2017
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It looks to me like your rig is pretty similar to mine, which I bot last year.  I have a "2015" Chev pickup crew cab with the same 5.3 engine.  My camper is pretty much like yours, maybe a couple of feet longer.  I went thru all these numbers last year just like you, and came up with the same conclusion that I was within the recommended specs.  So, we went on a trip to Rocky Mountain Natioal Park in Colorado last year.  We live in a relative remote area in the flatlands, so I never thought too much about the features this pickup has like tow mode, I just hooked up any trailer I had and took off and had no problems, although I never pulled anything as big and heavy as a travel trailer.  Around here on our two lane highways, I get along just fine.  The problem that I have is when you get out on the Interstate highway.  I am driving along in the right hand lane at 55 to 60 mph, and all those semis are rolling by at 70 to 75 mph.  Every time one goes by it just whips my whole rig back and forth for a few seconds.  This gets very tiring after awhile.  Occasionally a semi will go by at 60 mph or so and I don't feel anything.  I am still not sure exactly what the problem is, but I expect a combination of things.  I have learned many things on this forum.  My main thought is the pickup tires.  Chev 1500 pickups come with "P" tires, which I understand are basically car tires.  From what I understand, you should have "LT" tires.  Or are the springs and suspension on the pickup just too lite?  Or is this big box of a trailer that I am pulling catch too much wind and I am having the "tail wagging the dog" effect.  Otherwise, the pickup worked fine.  The tow/haul mode works fine.  It even slows you down when going downhill if the grade is steep enough.  I was concerned about going up the mountain to RNP from the base of the mountain.  I thought perhaps that I would run out of power about half way up and be stranded there.  I also picked up from this forum to use the manual shift when doing this, and it worked great.  And to also use the manual shift when coming down and to use the same gear when coming down.  Anyway, these are my experiences when towing with a half ton pickup.





 
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