No More Privately Owned EVs??

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Larry N.

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Check out this article about Ford EVs:

 

Skookum

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A lease is technically a rental agreement and the lessor decides if the vehicle can be purchased at the end of the lease.

Ford is still selling EV's, and they can't take those cars back.

GM only leased EV1's back in the day (25 years ago). You could not buy one.

Edit: Here's a little better explanation of what Ford is doing:

 
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John From Detroit

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This may work out to the leaser's advantage
You lease for a period and turn it back in. the battery dies (A few thousand $$$ I'm told) and FORD replaces it...
YOu buy it then You get to pay for the new E part.
 

Skookum

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This may work out to the leaser's advantage
You lease for a period and turn it back in. the battery dies (A few thousand $$$ I'm told) and FORD replaces it...
YOu buy it then You get to pay for the new E part.

Ford warranties EV battery packs for 8 years or 100,000 miles, and it's guaranteed to retain 70% of its original capacity over that same time period. Not bad, huh?
 

Viajeros

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Wow. Big jump from one company making a few EV’s that doesn’t allow customers to buy out a lease.
 

Lou Schneider

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The US government requires an automobile manufacturer to keep spare parts available for something like 10 years after the last vehicle is sold. That's why GM leased and then crushed their fleet of EV-1 electric cars instead of selling them to the lease holders. They'd have to provide too many unique parts for such a small pool of vehicles if they sold them. Ford may be making a similar calculation in deciding not to sell some models after the leases expire.
 

Viajeros

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Wow. Big jump from one company making a few EV’s that doesn’t allow customers to buy out a lease.
 

Viajeros

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The US government requires an automobile manufacturer to keep spare parts available for something like 10 years after the last vehicle is sold. That's why GM leased and then crushed their fleet of EV-1 electric cars instead of selling them to the lease holders. They'd have to provide too many unique parts for such a small pool of vehicles if they sold them. Ford may be making a similar calculation in deciding not to sell some models after the leases expire.
Ok. But I think most Mach E’s are purchased, not leased.
 

Mark_K5LXP

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In the grand scheme of things the only things you own are things you can fix. Anything else is just rented. With cars, you need a source of information for troubleshooting, a host of tools and equipment for repair, and parts or services for things that have failed. As a person that fixes and maintains everything I own even I have my limits - I can't make a u-joint or a spark plug, I have to buy those. For something like an EV where likely 99%+ of the car is proprietary you are wholly dependent on the OEM for everything other than charging it. Whether you're paying cash up front, a bank loan or a factory lease is somewhat secondary - the OEM controls the destiny of that car. From that point it comes down to the operator to justify the cost vs service the vehicle offers. For some, cars are a utility that it doesn't matter what the emblem is on the hood or what the energy source is, it's how they get to work and take trips. For others it's entertainment, like a "sports" or "luxury" car that is enjoyable to operate and that has a value. Yet others it's a statement, like when the Prius first came out and you declared your concern for the planet or whatever by driving one, irrespective of cost of ownership or actual utility value. It's not hard to envision a day where it may not be "impossible" but maybe not practical to own a car. You will have lease or maybe even just pay as you go, picking up a suitable transport for the trip needs, and paying as a function of time or distance. You will have no concern of repairs, maintenance or insurance, it's all built into the cost. Frankly, my life would be a lot simpler if I didn't have to fix my cars but I suspect the pay as you go model would force me financially to continue to do so. Just making the point though that technically very few people own anything, it's merely a construct of paying up front for the use of something over some period of time, then it's done either sold or disposed of at a loss. As cars become more and more specialized, proprietary and expensive the market will shift to a model that extracts optimum revenue and I can see private ownership becoming less and less a part of that model.

Mark B.
Albuquerque, NM
 
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