Opinions on a 77 Overland

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Gnuman

Active member
Joined
Oct 13, 2006
Posts
25
I was recently given a '77 Overland Class A motorhome. The rig seems sound to my (untrained) eye, but at least one person I talked to said it was trash and to get rid of it. This model was skinned in plywood, with aluminum siding over that, and there is some wood rot (right rear corner, outside where the closet is) with evidence that the leak started in the roof, in that area. That is all the outside rot I could find of any significance. The refrigerator was pulled out and replaced with a "dorm sized" model, and the heater needs to be rebuilt (cleaned and such). There are a couple of soft spots in the inside floor as well. Other than the engine (which is well within my expertice) that is all that is wrong with it. I'm very happy with it, but would like some kind of documentation for it (I'll be getting general RV repair manuals as well). I have been unable to find anything on Overlands on the 'Net, so I'm asking here. So what is the general opinion on Overland here?
 

cuts_up

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 11, 2006
Posts
549
Location
Texas
I know nothing about Overlands, but I did find this link when I was considering buying a motorhome with soft spots on the floor.  DH said he could do all the work, but I knew he didn't have time.  If you are handy and have the time, it might not be such a bad deal for you considering you are out no cash for the purchase of your motorhome.


http://rvforsaleguide.com/trailer-repair/rv-trailer-repair.htm



 

Shayne

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 22, 2006
Posts
4,324
I and some friends rebuilt a couple of older RV and unless this is soething special as an Air Stream or Avion,  you might wind up spending a lot of money but more important more man hrs into it than it's worth.  When You get into the wood on the sides, roof and floor, it's trouble all the way.  No good cheap or easy way to do it.  Then when you've completed it What do you have?  Just a piece of improved nothing.  It's your choice but I'd try to peddle it and buy something a little better that doesn't need as much work.  But again it's up to you.  Have fun cause if it becomes a chore than you've wasted time and money and something unfinished is worth nothing.  Good luck  JMHO
 

Gnuman

Active member
Joined
Oct 13, 2006
Posts
25
Shayne said:
I and some friends rebuilt a couple of older RV and unless this is something special as an Air Stream or Avion,  you might wind up spending a lot of money but more important more man hrs into it than it's worth.  When You get into the wood on the sides, roof and floor, it's trouble all the way.  No good cheap or easy way to do it.  Then when you've completed it What do you have?  Just a piece of improved nothing.  It's your choice but I'd try to peddle it and buy something a little better that doesn't need as much work.  But again it's up to you.  Have fun cause if it becomes a chore than you've wasted time and money and something unfinished is worth nothing.  Good luck  JMHO

Granted that I will never realise a profit from selling it. I never intend to sell it. I expect to be living in this rig as long as it is serviceable. The rot in the outer shell covers perhaps 15% of the surface (about the same area as the large inside closet in the head), and the skin on the roof is loose. There is a bit of weathering in the plywood around the nose, and the forced air heater does not work. Other than the engine itself, that is 90% of what is wrong with this unit. I have been living in it for the last month, and am happy with the percentage of things that are working, at it's age. Given that anything I get that is 30 years old, will be of little value to anyone else, my actual question is "Is this Overland motorhome a fairly good quality unit, or is it a nightmare waiting to happen?".
 
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