Outer skin delamination

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Oldude

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Would someone brief me on what to look for and a possible fix in regard to minor outer skin delamination? ???  Also what are some of the brand names of the rubber based sealants used for rubber membrane roof panel caulking?  My coach is several years old and to my knowledge has never been properly resealed.
 

Ron

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I recommend using a product called Eternabond to seal the roof.  This is a tape that can be applied over the old caulking and will probably out last any of us.  Can be purchased at camping world or on line.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Skin delamination will show as a low "bubble" (slightly raised area) in the skin, usually only 1/8-1/4 inch above the surrounding area.  Some may be noticeable only when looking down the side in morning or evening light, when the low angle of light casts a more visible shadow. If caused by a simple gluing failure, it is possible to put small holes or a slit on the outer skin and inject glue underneath, then press it back down and [somehow] firmly clamp until dry.  If necessary, put screws in to hold it in place and then remove them (or file off the heads) once the glue dries. Fill the holes/slits with a fiberglass gel coat repair compound afterwards.  Or you can just live with the delamination - you won't even notice it after a few weeks and it generally does not spread any further.

If the delamination was caused by a water leak, obviousy the leak has to be found and fixed first. Then you have to figure out if there is any sub-surface damage, e.g. rotted wood panels or structure and repair that, which may require removal of a piece of skin.  You may be able to cut out the skin out in 1-2 pieces, repair the damage and then re-attach the original skin to cover most of the opening. Use gel coat repair to fill the seams. More likely, though, you would be in for a fiberglass repair job and repaint of the area or even the whole side.
 

Oldude

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You guys are the greatest....This whole forum has already supplied a world of knowledge to me that would take years of experience to obtain. ;D
 

Oldude

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"If caused by a simple gluing failure, it is possible to put small holes or a slit on the outer skin and inject glue underneath, then press it back down and [somehow] firmly clamp until dry. "....Gary is there a particular brand of adhesive you recommend?
 

blueblood

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Oldude said:
Would someone brief me on what to look for and a possible fix in regard to minor outer skin delamination? ???? Also what are some of the brand names of the rubber based sealants used for rubber membrane roof panel caulking?? My coach is several years old and to my knowledge has never been properly resealed.

FWIW- Delam is often a manufacturers defect and is sometimes fixed by them long after warranty has expired. Fleetwood had this problem for awhile and has fixed a number of units.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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I would use a contact cement if the skin was separated enough to apply it to both sides before tpouching them together, as such cements require.  If you have to inject or trickle it down in where the materials almost touch, contact cements won't work and you will need a glue that works on non-porous surfaces (not a wood glue, which are for porous materials). I'm afraid I don't know any brand names to suggest, but  3M makes an adhesive for almost anything.
 
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RV Roamer said:
I would use a contact cement if the skin was separated enough to apply it to both sides before tpouching them together, as such cements require.  If you have to inject or trickle it down in where the materials almost touch, contact cements won't work and you will need a glue that works on non-porous surfaces (not a wood glue, which are for porous materials). I'm afraid I don't know any brand names to suggest, but  3M makes an adhesive for almost anything.

Gorilla glue would be a good candidate.
 
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