Please advise. 2007 Fleetwood Tioga. Reliability & Price

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adam1956

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Hello

Appreciate your advice. New to RVs. Like to try it out with a small one.
Found a 2007 Fleetwood Tioga 22b with Vortec 6000 Engine. Roughly 40k miles.

How is the quality of this one? Any history that I should be aware of?
What is a fair price to pay? It is in very good condition.

Looking fwd to your valuable advice or thoughts.

Thank you much
 

Kirk

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Tioga is a midrange quality RV with a reasonably good reputation. The catch is that with even the very best RV, after 14 years of abuse or neglect could be a disaster just waiting to happen. I strongly suggest that you have a professional inspect the RV before you buy it. Also, check the date codes on the tires as you probably will need to replace them and the date made is the only way to be sure.
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adam1956

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Thank you so much Kirk. Valuable advice. I called an inspector. He is quoting $700. Asking price is $32.5k. Seller can ask for whatever they think is right as the inventory is low. But I am finding it hard to pay that much for a 14 yr old vehicle. It certainly needs rear tires, touch up paint that is cracking up in some places and an update to interiors. Miles are low and the ride is slick though.

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Isaac-1

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$700 is about the going rate for an NRVIA certified level 2 inspector to perform an RV inspection on a class C motorhome, note that such RV inspection are primarily an inspection of the RV house side of things, and only a cursory level inspection of the chassis / drive train side. For the chassis side you need a mechanic shop familiar with the particular brand of chassis (sounds chevrolet in the case), though in general it is the RV house side that tends to need the most inspection on RV's as they tend not to be high mileage vehicles. I too would strongly advise getting a professional RV inspection and after that possibly get a mechanic to look at the chassis side of things, as a novice you simply don't know the signs of things to look for that may be signs of major issues, most often hidden rot caused by water penetration around the windows or roof penetrations.

As to prices, they are crazy with the current Covid camping craze combined with short supply of new RV's with prices being up 30-50% perhaps more compared to pre-covid on the exact same used RV, this is particularly the case with smaller RV's like the one you are considering. In the last 6 months I have seen several coaches of the same model and year as mine sell for over 40% more than I paid for my coach 5 years ago, few if any of which were in better condition by any measure than mine was when I bought it
 

Kirk

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Asking price is $32.5k. Seller can ask for whatever they think is right as the inventory is low.
While it is true that they can ask, but I would be very surprised if they actually got someone to pay that much. Average retail price is only $21,000 so I think that you would be making a major mistake to pay that price, even with covid effects. If things continue to improve you will see prices fall dramatically and likely will even if it doesn't.
 

adam1956

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Orlando, FL
$700 is about the going rate for an NRVIA certified level 2 inspector to perform an RV inspection on a class C motorhome, note that such RV inspection are primarily an inspection of the RV house side of things, and only a cursory level inspection of the chassis / drive train side. For the chassis side you need a mechanic shop familiar with the particular brand of chassis (sounds chevrolet in the case), though in general it is the RV house side that tends to need the most inspection on RV's as they tend not to be high mileage vehicles. I too would strongly advise getting a professional RV inspection and after that possibly get a mechanic to look at the chassis side of things, as a novice you simply don't know the signs of things to look for that may be signs of major issues, most often hidden rot caused by water penetration around the windows or roof penetrations.

As to prices, they are crazy with the current Covid camping craze combined with short supply of new RV's with prices being up 30-50% perhaps more compared to pre-covid on the exact same used RV, this is particularly the case with smaller RV's like the one you are considering. In the last 6 months I have seen several coaches of the same model and year as mine sell for over 40% more than I paid for my coach 5 years ago, few if any of which were in better condition by any measure than mine was when I bought it
100% agree. A local example below. $85k for a coverted unit. As far as I see, no bathroom.
 

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adam1956

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Orlando, FL
While it is true that they can ask, but I would be very surprised if they actually got someone to pay that much. Average retail price is only $21,000 so I think that you would be making a major mistake to pay that price, even with covid effects. If things continue to improve you will see prices fall dramatically and likely will even if it doesn't.
Yes sir. I am going to be objective and stick to the avg retail reange.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Without meaning to disagree, I want to remind you (and everybody) that the free (online) NADA RV book value is not based on actual market value (sales data). It's estimated depreciation from MSRP using a formula devised by the folks at NADA. Based on what I see in advertised asking prices, that $32.5k is not out of line for the market. Whether the seller will accept less, and how much, is another question entirely. You will have to make an offer to find out. New listsings typically don't react well to discounted offers, but after some weeks on the market they get more reasonable.

The only free source I know of that has actual sales data is PPL Motorhomes, a consignment dealer. Remember those are essentially private seller prices - PPL just takes a commission (10%?) on the transaction. Look at the mini-motorhome (Class B & C) category.
 
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JudyJB

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While it may look in very good condition, there are many things inside that could be in bad condition. And the low mileage is not necessarily a positive because it probably sat in a storage lot for 99% of its life. What you really need to do is to get an RV mechanic to check things like roof for leaks, plumbing systems and water heater, refrigerator, AC etc
 

Kirk

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Without meaning to disagree, I want to remind you (and everybody) that the free (online) NADA RV book value is not based on actual market value (sales data).
I'm not sure what your source is, but I do know that the published version of the NADA book is generated from sales reports and it is available at most public libraries. At least the NADA members are told.
 

Isaac-1

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I really doubt that given that they value every sub 30 ft P30 chassis coach built between 1997-2002 regardless of brand of RV or MSRP at the exact same price. Does not matter if it is an entry level Fleetwood Flair with vinyl graphics and particle board cabinets and an original MSRP $53,500 or a Safari Trek with full body paint, solid wood cabinetwork and an MSRP of $109,000 they still are all worth the same according to NADA.
 

adam1956

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While it may look in very good condition, there are many things inside that could be in bad condition. And the low mileage is not necessarily a positive because it probably sat in a storage lot for 99% of its life. What you really need to do is to get an RV mechanic to check things like roof for leaks, plumbing systems and water heater, refrigerator, AC etc
Thx Judy.
Based on your insights .. I am thinking ... at the end of the day the plumbing systems etc are old. Will be fun to see how they behave during peak, icy winter on a mountain. Yep. I see your point.
 

adam1956

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rvsearches.PNG

Out of curiosity, I looked at searches for 'RV' over 16+ years on Google Trends. Interesting.

Decembers, as most experienced people say, are the lows.
Overall the trendline is increasing.
Green arrows: A small impulsive uptick as the lockdown began (green up arrow). And pandemic peak summer (green down arrow).
Red arrow: start of an annual downward trend.

Click on link to see the trends across states, dates etc
 
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