Problems with Michelin tires?

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Tom

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I've never experienced any problems with Michelins, but I've heard second hand reports of blowouts.
 

Ron

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errolcw said:
Has anybody had a lot of problems with blowouts and Michelin tires?

I am not a Michelin fan and after having a bad experience (no blowouts) don't intend to ever have Michelins again.? However,? I believe that the major cause of blowouts on RV/s is caused mostly be one of two things regardless of the brand of tire used.? 1. Over load condition that exceeds the tires capabilities and 2. aged out of date tires that are older than 7 years since date of manufacture.

Now there can be other causes such as road hazards but I don't think these conditions cause even 10% of tire failures.? I firmly believe most RV tire failures are caused by overloaded RV/s regardless of the brand of tire used.

If you are having blowout problems with any tire make weigh the vehicle as loaded perferably at each tire then compare with the manufactures tire charts to insure you are within limits.? Check the tire date of manufacture to determine age of the tire.? If any of the tires are overloaded or the tire is more than 7 years old then the problem is NOT related to the tire manufacturer.



 

BernieD

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Ron

Don't forget, the most common cause for tire blowouts is underinflation, and RVSEF (successor to A-Weigh-We-Go) found that an extremely large number of RVs that they weighed were underinflated.
 

Ron

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BernieD said:
Ron

Don't forget, the most common cause for tire blowouts is underinflation, and RVSEF (successor to A-Weigh-We-Go) found that an extremely large number of RVs that they weighed were underinflated.

You are absolutely correct. Thanks for making that clear Bernie.  In my own thinking I figure that an under inflated tire is an overloaded tire since the correct inflation pressure is determined from the tire charts based on the load the tire is carrying.  Glad clarified that.
 

caltex

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I have no idea whether Michelin tires have a problem or not.  But before I bought my first motorhome, I spent a lot of time on the various forums reading anything I could about RVs and the lifestyle. A very common thread was the complaints about Michelin tires and their tendency for zipper failure (blowout from the sidewall). There were many, many complainants, all denied underinflating or overloading the tires.  There were also many complaints about Michelin's response to their tales of tire failures.

When I got the new motorhome I pulled off the Michelins and put on Goodyears. The equivalent size Goodyear had a much higher load rating which allowed me to drop the pressure and get a much better riding coach. My guess is that there was probably blame for everyone involved, a marginal tire without sufficient load margin and some innattention to maintaining proper pressures. I just didn't want to worry about tires, and the stories had gotten to me. The deal breaker was Michelin's apparent refusal to stand behind their tires.
 
N

Newbee

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This is a timley thread for me as I am ready to purchase new tires for the Bounder.? The old girl came with michelins and for us inexperienced RVers, who see the tire commercials and hype on TV, we might think we were doing the best thing by going with the "Big Name" Michelin.? I'll shop load rating as well as price now when I start looking in earnest.? The discussion thus far has kindled a question that I've had for some time concerning tire pressure? I understand the relationship, and associated risks, between underinflated tires and loading/overloading.? i.e. as the load goes up, the inflation pressure should go up, not to exceed that rated for that tire in it's mounted position (with all other weight ratings associated with the subject vehicle being adhered to).? Now my question is this.? What is the down side (danger, folly, etc...) to holding your tire pressure at, or near, the MAX rated for that tire, if/when you know you haven't overloaded the vehicle itself?? Is it tire wear, comfort in ride, or worse?? I doubt that I will weigh my vehicle before each and every trip and I can assure you I couldn't load it the same each trip if I tried.  Do I adjust tire pressure each time or leave it alone?? I'm not trying to be wise, just wisened.? As I've alrteady said, I am learnig a lot from reading these discussions every day.? Your advice here may prevent you from having to stop and help me along the road somewhere someday.  livin' N learnin', Lou? ? ? ? ? ?
 

Tom

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Assuming you've read this discussion on tire inflation, overinflation will affect both the ride and the handling of the coach. When we first got our current coach, I took the word of the tech when he said the tire pressures should be 125 psi. Steering was a white knuckled, 2-handed job. First time I checked the tire pressures I found he'd inflated them to 140 psi. After weighing the coach and lowering the tire pressures to approximately the correct values (90-100psi), the ride smoothed out and handling/steering improved significantly.

I now inflate the tires to approx 5 lbs over the recommended pressure and this takes care of variations in loading. I merely check the pressures before each trip in case of a leak, but rarely have to re-inflate.
 

Ron

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Tom is correct in that it is not good to have your tires over inflated either.  Not as unforgiving as under inflated but still not recommended.  The best way to determine ideal tire pressure is to weight the vehicle preferably at each wheel to determine load on each wheel.  Use the highest weight for each axle and use that for determining the proper weight by using your tire manufacturers charts for your make and size tire.  Inflation pressures should be the same on the same axle.

check out these videos for information on tire safety.  Although these videos are provided by Michelin they information applies to all tires.

http://www.michelinrvtires.com/michelinrvtires/other/RvVideos.jsp 

I would recommend reviewing these videos a couple times there is some good information there that might just save you from a serious accident.
 
N

Newbee

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Thanks Tom and Ron,  I had viewed the referenced videos, and will again, but I didn't get the impression that there was a significant gap between the max pressure rating and that which was required for these monsters we drive.  When Tom mentioned pressures of 125 and 140 I suddenly got the point.  All things can be carried to extreme.  I'll use the technique endorsed on the other thread about weighing at my typical/max load, calculate pressures required, adding 5lbs, and maintain over similar trips and conditions.  lou 
 
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