Propane/Furnace problems?

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gilmandc

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I've got a 1993 Tioga Montara and I can't seem to light the furnace (the fan blows cold) or the pilot light on the stove. Once the propane tank valve is opened I should be getting gas to the stove at least, right? And the furnace should fire when the thermostat is switched to on?
 

Kirk

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If you just turned the propane on after a long time with it off, first of all light the stove top in order to vent the air out of the lines. Use a butane lighter and hold it 1/2" or so from the burner as it will blow air for about a minute or so before the propane gets there. Once the stove top burner lights, let it burn for a couple of minutes, then shut it off and try the furnace. It still may take 3 or 4 attempts before all of the air is out of the lines and it will light. While you are about it, try the propane water heater as well. If the water heater lights and the furnace still doesn't even after 3 or 4 attempts, you may want to check the 12V supply as if the battery voltage drops below 11V or so the furnace blower will not run fast enough to move the combustion air needed and the furnace has a switch (called sail switch) that must close for the furnace to operate.
 

gilmandc

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No luck lighting the stove top. I don't think I'm getting gas to the stove. The LP tank is 3/4 full and I can hear it flow when I open the valve. Might be a problem with the line?
 

steveblonde

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I got ? I have is better english, lol how do you know you have 3/4 of a tank of propane? As said light the stove first to bleed the line. If the stove wont light and your sure you have propane its a feed issue, take the tank out and hook it to something like a bbq to see if it will light it? It could be regulator, or a faulty gauge?
 

JayArr

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Could be a problem with the line. Try unhooking the line from the regulator and sending compressed air into it. If the compressed air doesn't come out the pilot orifice on the stove then the line is blocked. You can check by lighting a match and seeing if the flame gets pushed around when you put it close to the pilot orifice.

When you were trying to light the stove how long did you try? When my propane has been off for a while it can take up to two minutes to get good gas to the stove before it will light. Maybe you were just too impatient?
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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You can disconnect the gas line after the regulator to see if LP gas is flowing out of the tank and thru the regulator. The regulator produces very low pressure, about 0.5 psi, so not dangerous to do that (but NO Flames nearby!). If you have pressure at the regulator exit but not at the stove inlet, a clog in the gas line is a possibility. Sometimes an oil residue from old propane gets pushed out into the line. It's not a common failure, but it can happen.
 

gilmandc

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Could be a problem with the line. Try unhooking the line from the regulator and sending compressed air into it. If the compressed air doesn't come out the pilot orifice on the stove then the line is blocked. You can check by lighting a match and seeing if the flame gets pushed around when you put it close to the pilot orifice.

When you were trying to light the stove how long did you try? When my propane has been off for a while it can take up to two minutes to get good gas to the stove before it will light. Maybe you were just too impatient?
I'll try that. The propane has been off for a good while. I tried lighting it for a few minutes.
 

JayArr

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If the line is blocked try pulling your compressed air line into the RV, disconnect the line from the stove and blow backwards toward the regulator (with it still disconnected at the regulator end).

Two reasons for this: First is that if you are going to blow out a bunch of old oil and crud you don't want to blow it into the RV - it stinks and is messy. Second: It will probably be easier to blow in the reverse direction to the flow when it blocked.

If you get a bunch of tar like crud coming out you could think about back flushing the line with a solvent to get it clean but make sure it's completely dry before hooking it back up to propane.
 

NY_Dutch

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Could be a problem with the line. Try unhooking the line from the regulator and sending compressed air into it. If the compressed air doesn't come out the pilot orifice on the stove then the line is blocked. You can check by lighting a match and seeing if the flame gets pushed around when you put it close to the pilot orifice.

When you were trying to light the stove how long did you try? When my propane has been off for a while it can take up to two minutes to get good gas to the stove before it will light. Maybe you were just too impatient?
Be careful using a compressor for testing. Make sure you use a very low (no more than 1-2 PSI) pressure since many RV ranges have a secondary regulator installed that can be damaged by higher pressures.
 

Kirk

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When you turn the gas valve on, you must turn it on very, very, slowly. I mean slow.
That is a very good point. All propane bottles have what they call a stop flow valve inside to stop the flow of propane in the event that a gas line should ever be cut. The surge of gas closes that safety valve and opening into an empty gas line can do the same, so try again very slowly.
When my propane has been off for a while it can take up to two minutes to get good gas to the stove before it will light.
When this is the case you can detect the air leaving the burners by holding a lighted butane lighter next to the burner as the flam will be blown away from the supply and so indicate that there is gas coming and you just need to wait for it.
 

Isaac-1

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It is a good idea to replace the propane regulator every 8-10 years as the rubber diaphragm is prone to aging issues
 

shelad06

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Do you have a LP Gas Detector near the entry step? I have a 94 Montara and I have to turn that switch on as well. Looks similar to this.
 

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gilmandc

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It is a good idea to replace the propane regulator every 8-10 years as the rubber diaphragm is prone to aging issues
I just installed a new regulator. Now the stove pilot will flicker a lighter flame but won't light even after a number of minutes of trying. I'm gonna try clearing the line out
 

John From Detroit

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One question "The propane tank is 3/4 FULL"

per the remote display panel or per the dial gauge on the tank.. The Dial gauge is surprisingly accurate the remote panel can be totally off as in show gas when you have none.
 

Old_Crow

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Yes I have the same thing, I don't run it because it just chirps nonstop as soon as I turn it on
Some of those older propane leak detectors were wired to a solenoid on the propane tank that won't let the gas flow if the detector is turned off. The constant chirping when you turn the detector on indicates that the thing has reached the end of it's lifespan.
Newer detectors don't have the solenoid, as it is no longer legally required. If you have such a solenoid, just remove it.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Yes I have the same thing, I don't run it because it just chirps nonstop as soon as I turn it on
You may not have that option - the old style detectors include a gas line shut-off. If the detector is chirping an alarm or is turned off, the gas is shut off by a valve controlled. That looks like a newer model that would not have the shut-off, but its worth checking. The shut-off valve would be back by the LP tank, after the regulator.
 

shelad06

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Yes I have the same thing, I don't run it because it just chirps nonstop as soon as I turn it on
The pic is for reference. Mine usually chirps for a few seconds, then you can hear the valve open. It is designed to operate a valve at the tank. If it detects propane, it shuts the valve and stops the propane. If you turn on your propane, and turn the switch on, it will chirp, but should stop after a few seconds. Once it stops, you'll hear the valve open at the tank. If it doesn't stop chirping, the detector may be no good. But that is why you are not getting propane to the appliances.
 
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Kirk

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The shut-off valve would be back by the LP tank, after the regulator.
If you have one, it probably looks similar to one of these.
71bqENAnbLL._AC_UL200_SR200,200_.jpg
318l4ZLuLcL._AC_UL200_SR200,200_.jpg
 
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