Question on security locks....

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stepbill

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Is there really any need to use a trailer coupler lock when the TT is attached to the tow vehicle. I have an Amplock that I use when disconnected but was not sure about also using a lock on the latch also when disconnected or when connected to the truck. What do you all do?
 

John From Detroit

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Davison Michigan
I suggest it. also a lock on your receiver pins.
I had a receiver pin come out and total the tow bar on my car.. Major damage ot car as well.
NOW.. I do not think it was vandals.. I think it was one of those once in a life sequences of events but ....... Stuff happens and when I got it back together I made sure it did not happen again.
 

Marty1300

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Mar 30, 2016
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When traveling and in motion I would have just a pin and no padlock. That way if you have to disconnect quickly in the event of an emergency you are not searching for the key
 

Lou Schneider

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I don't use a lock but I do have a pin in the coupler while travelling. Don't rely on the mechanical latch holding by itself, you need something in the locking hole to ensure the hitch stays latched.
 

Mark_K5LXP

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When I've parked my trailers in the driveway it was secured by a heavy chain through the frame to a large tree, or I took the wheels off and put them in the garage. My buddy had his palamino trailer taken from his driveway and it was recovered weeks later (trashed) with the ball lock still in place.

Mark B.
Albuquerque, NM
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Is there really any need to use a trailer coupler lock when the TT is attached to the tow vehicle.
I guess it depends on where you travel and the stops along the way. We always avoided locales where there was sufficient risk of theft or vandalism to make hitch or towbar locks advisable, but not everyone has that flexibility.

Maybe your personal attitude is a factor too. Some people have more worry & fear than others. You should take whatever measures give you peace-of-mind.
 

Martian

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Independent Republic of Horry
I grew up in New York City and everything got locked. It became a lifelong habit which has never failed me. Overkill? Maybe but nothing ever came apart or unlatched on its own. Still using the same set of locks that I bought in 2004 but will be replacing them soon as the keys are wearing out. Minimal expense and just as easy to use as non locking pins. If only there was a way to lock the tank drains as we had them opened on two occasions while we were shopping. No mess until we were in the campsite as I always keep the cap on the drain.
 

Kirk

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Back in the 1980's I was using a padlock to keep the hitch latched to the ball on my tow vehicle. In 1990 we changed to a class A and when I started towing I always locked the towed vehicle to the motorhome until one day we were traveling west through the Columbia River Gorge when we came on a class A diesel with and engine fire. I pulled in to join the effort to save things with our fire extinguisher. The towed vehicle was locked to the coach and the owner ran back to get key to unlock it while I and 2 others attempted to stop the fire. We were not able to do anything and the fire spread to a point that the owner was not able to get close enough to unlock the hitch to move his car. The result was that by the time a fire truck arrived the entire front of the car was smoking and all of the paint damaged. Once the fire department was on the scene we were directed to leave so I don't know if the car was usable but at the next stop I removed the lock on ours and just replaced it with a coupler pin device. I do the same with our travel trailer since we downsized, just for safety. Every time that we stop for any reason, before entering our tow truck I do a complete walk-around, checking all couplers and attaching points and everything just as I do prior to starting travel. I do use a lock for the receiver but not for the hitch.
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NY_Dutch

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When I've parked my trailers in the driveway it was secured by a heavy chain through the frame to a large tree, or I took the wheels off and put them in the garage. My buddy had his palamino trailer taken from his driveway and it was recovered weeks later (trashed) with the ball lock still in place.

Mark B.
Albuquerque, NM
Yes, ball locks are basically useless. When I was in the towing business, we repo'ed a number of various type trailers just by backing a truck up to the tongue and hooking up the safety chains and taking off. Even 5'vers with pin locks weren't a problem. For those, we'd just back in a tow truck with the wrap around wheel lift stinger extended and pick up the front at the landing gear.

For going down the road, I agree with those that pin the latch as a safety precaution, and would only suggest a lock for those that plan on extended stops in rest areas, truck stops, etc., where the clientele could be "iffy". Others just need to check the hookup at stops. A quick walk around at fuel stops, etc., is always a good idea.
 

niget2002

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Josephine, TX
Yes, ball locks are basically useless. When I was in the towing business, we repo'ed a number of various type trailers just by backing a truck up to the tongue and hooking up the safety chains and taking off. Even 5'vers with pin locks weren't a problem. For those, we'd just back in a tow truck with the wrap around wheel lift stinger extended and pick up the front at the landing gear.

For going down the road, I agree with those that pin the latch as a safety precaution, and would only suggest a lock for those that plan on extended stops in rest areas, truck stops, etc., where the clientele could be "iffy". Others just need to check the hookup at stops. A quick walk around at fuel stops, etc., is always a good idea.
My ball lock is setup to lock the chains inside of it. Granted, if the thieves bring their own chain, they can still take it, but that's what insurance is for.

I lock my hitch and the latch. It's a habit I've always been in and will continue to do. I've been locking both since I started pulling jet skis when I turned 16.
 

NY_Dutch

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My ball lock is setup to lock the chains inside of it. Granted, if the thieves bring their own chain, they can still take it, but that's what insurance is for.

I lock my hitch and the latch. It's a habit I've always been in and will continue to do. I've been locking both since I started pulling jet skis when I turned 16.
Yes, if the safety chains weren't available to us or we felt they were in poor condition we just wrapped our own chain around the tongue and took off with trailer in tow. Of course real thieves also had the option of cutting locks and chains, something we were not allowed to do for a repo. Fortunately, most folks gave up the repo'ed vehicles without much argument when presented with the legal paperwork.
 

CharlesinGA

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I have a Bolt lock for the pin that secures the hitch into the receiver, and another Bolt lock for the hitch itself. My truck key works both of them. They are not there to prevent thieves, but rather to prevent intentional acts of mischievous behavior which can lead to disaster. People will pull pins and set breakaways on trailers in parking lots when no one is around, and if you do a walkaround and happen to miss it no telling what will happen.

Charles
 
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