Quit smoking

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jje1960

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Nov 11, 2007
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Well, after 35 some odd' years.... Am giving the 'quit smoking' a try.  First time was USMC boot camp, that was actually easy, just couldn't do it, unfortunately, went straight to the butt's upon completion.  Back then we could smoke on the Navy ships while on float, today they are much stricter.  At any-rate, for the first time in 35 years I'm trying to give it up, my choice... Working out pretty good so far!  Anyone else out there trying to give it up?
 

KodiakRV

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Aug 19, 2006
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Florida
Good for you!  You can do it!  I quit after 18 years and my sister quit after 50 years!
 

Carl L

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west Los Angeles
Quit is more like it.  Quit a 2-3 pack a day habit, in 1965, cold turkey, and never went back.  So hang in there dude -- there is such a thing as sucess. 

Hate those damn butts and their stink nowadays.  :mad:
 

FrankNichols

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Dec 2, 2010
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64
Quitting is the easy part, deciding to quit and not just "trying to quit" is the hard part.

I quit 2 years ago after 40+ years smoking 2 packs a day. I "tried" many times, but finally "decided" to QUIT and never looked back.

Frank
 

Molaker

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Jun 16, 2010
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Springfield, Mo.
Took me 40 years and several tries, but I finally managed to quit about 14 years ago.  The mind is a funny thing.  I decided I could go back to smoking any time I wanted to and that actually helped me to not want to - that and about $1000 worth of Nicorette gum. :)
 

jje1960

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O my... You would not believe how great it feels to have 4 responses within 30mins.... This is not just another attempt... I've never really tried to do this before.  I knew it was time to do this, wish I had of had the courage 20yrs ago.  My DW and kids are well... supporting Dad!  There is actually two packages of cigarettes in the kitchen, un-opened, I bought them the morning I decided to quit.... they are still there.  Cool with others that have quitting stories, keep them coming.
 

AndyinLexington

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May 3, 2010
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Lexington, KY
I'm not a smoker, but have some other habits I'm "quitting" and some I'm "starting".  Helps me a LOT to just focus on what is right in front of me.  Like just what I need to do right now, not try to mentally face the entire journey at once.  I'm six months into starting one good habit, and about three months into quitting a bad habit.  It's going well so far.  My grandfather quit smoking after around 60 years of smoking Lucky Strikes.  Just decided one day in the middle of a carton that he'd had enough.  I really admire that determination and staying power. 
 

JerArdra

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At about 18 or 19 years old my Mother, Father (both heavy smokers), Sister, and I were sailing in Lake Huron.

I was at the helm and the three of them were dozing off laying on the deck.  In fact we were just about to lose the site of land so I took a reciprocal compass heading to ensure a direct route back to Sarnia.

I remember this like it was yesterday especially because back then (1950s) nobody was preaching that folks should stop smoking.

I pulled out my red-colored pack of Pall Mall king size cigarettes.  I lit one and didn't even inhale the first drag.  I just blew it out of my mouth, twisted the cigarette pack up, and threw it overboard along with the one I just lit up.  I then looked at my cigarette lighter, thought about it, and decided to toss it overboard too. 

That was it for me.  Never smoked again and am I so glad.  For some unknown reason I quit instantly.

When my folks and sister woke up I told them that I just quit smoking.  To this day I wish I could remember their comments.

JerryF   
 

Tom and Margi

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Tom and I both quit in 1989.  He quit cold turkey.  I chewed that awful Nicorette gum, chewing gum, and ate tons of unsalted, unbuttered popcorn to keep my mouth busy.  It's worth it!  Can't stand the stink and stain any more.  Try putting what you would have spent on cigarettes into a separate account and spoil yourself with a reward.  Hang in there!

Margi
 

PancakeBill

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Benson - Tucson, AZ. West Yellowstone,MT
My theory, and looks like you subscribed, is to quit while the habit is still nearby.  Don't give them away, don't smoke them, throw them away.  Not at the end of this pack, but while there is still some in there.  Then just don't smoke anymore.  So glad I did, but at times, a whiff of a sulphur match lighting one, the pleasure receptor pops.  It has been 40 years.  Of course, the second whiff of smoke is disgusting.
 

Just Lou

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PancakeBill said:
.... at times, a whiff of a sulphur match lighting one, the pleasure receptor pops. 

Bill, I've had the same thing happen.  There's just something about that smell of the sulphur match lighting that makes the memory so vivid.  I can enjoy the first whiff of fresh smoke too, but the pleasure soon turns to nausea.

I'm trying to quit also.  I had my last one on February, 5th, 1991. 

Hang in there, Jim.  You can do it.
 

NY_Dutch

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Where our wheels take us!
I quit a 2-3 pack a day 50 year habit in 2003 after many previous failed attempts using various "traditional" methods, including cold turkey. What worked for me this time, was moving back my first smoke of the day. The first one when getting up in the morning got moved back to with my first cup of coffee, and then to the ride into work, and so on. As I got comfortable with each progression, I'd move it back another step. All in all, it took me about 6 weeks, with a couple of minor setbacks along the way, but when I realized one night that it was bed time and I hadn't had my first one for the day, I figured I really didn't need it. I've had no set backs since. My wife quit about the same time using the patch and pills and had an awful time of it, but she hung in and got through it. I don't know if my method will work for someone else, but it sure worked for me!
 

catblaster

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I remember my last one..July 17, 2000 at approx 2am.....smoked my last one then walked into the emergency room cause I had been having a heart attack. But I had to have that last cigarette!!
 

Wendy

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Colorado
Quit cold turkey in 1981 after 12 years of 2 packs a day. Wasn't easy but it was doable. Never been sorry and can't stand the smell of smoke now. If nothing else, think of how much money you'll save!
 

BobNSam

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Waco, TX
My wife quit smoking cold turkey in 2003; no pain, no strain for her at the time.
Smoking quit me in 2005 after 40  years.
I caught a very bad chest cold and could barely breath for about 3 days. Any attempt to smoke for a while after that caused immediate choking and coughing. After a week I decided that smoking had quit me...I still have the desire but...now, when I am around a smoker I can imagine what others smelled when I smoked my two packs a day. I must have reeked.
Here's to all those that have been able to quit and best luck to all those attempting to quit.
Bob
 

Wizard46

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Mar 12, 2009
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I quit about 15 years ago, after smoking 3 packs a day. I will say that it was not easy, but once I made my mind up to quit, I just fought to keep it up. Never think about it now.
 

taoshum

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Taos, NM
One of the most (mentally) painful experiences I recall.  Thought I was going to go completely insane for a while... gum, shots, the works and finally, after a long time, I got over it.  LOL, I was about 45-50 at the time... and I told myself, if I made it to 65 I could start again if I still wanted to smoke.  I keep raising the age to start again and now, probably won't do it.  Now if they legalize the other stuff, would have to reconsider the whole question, LOL, again.

Do whatever you have to do to continue NO SMOKIN'--- you will feel much better, very soon... but the memories never go away, IMHO.

Our neighbor, who smoked 3X more than anyone I knew, followed my lead after six months and then we could support each other.  Finding someone to "share the pain" is often helpful, as long as they don't start smokin' again, then it would be a challenge...
 

gwcowgill

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Homestead, Fl when not traveling
You can do it, I did it after 45 years of smoking. Sometimes I catch myself reach for that pack in my shirt pocket. That is when I remind myself how much better I feel now. If you want to quit you can do it!
 

Just Lou

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Dec 25, 2005
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catblaster said:
I remember my last one..July 17, 2000 at approx 2am.....smoked my last one then walked into the emergency room cause I had been having a heart attack. But I had to have that last cigarette!!

Will, I wish you would stop reminding me of how many times we've made the same mistakes.  I, too, had to experience a life threatening situation before I even attempted to quit smoking.  I "enjoyed" my last smoke on the front steps of Duke Medical Center as I was entering to receive a quadruple bypass operation.

I didn't make the decision to quit until I realized that I had gone a full week without a smoke.  It just didn't make sense to have another one. ???

That was my last smoke but, unfortunately, not my last bypass operation. :) :(

BTW - I discovered after quitting, that I didn't have a nicotine addiction, I had a smoking habit.  Once I broke the pattern of reaching for my shirt pocket, I had NO craving for anything associated with the nasty habit.  Some folks are not so lucky.  For some, the craving never goes away.
 
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