Rear sway bar only?

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

rider1520

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 15, 2010
Posts
240
Location
Nazareth, Pa
I have a 2017 Winnebago Vista 29 VE 18,000 GVRW and experience significant (to me) rocking on uneven roads. The local dealer recommends replacing the stock sway bar with a Road Master (RM-1139-0146) anti sway bar. He said most people only get the rear and like the improvement. First, all I have read states to leave the stock bar on and add the Road Master, does that make sense? Secondly, does only adding the rear make a enough of difference? I don?t want to spend more money but I also don?t want to move forward only to find I need to do more. Thanks! 
 

ChasA

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 21, 2009
Posts
1,951
I had a 2006 Winnebago Sightseer.  At one of the first rallies I went to a guy named Chip Maddox  from RalliesRUs held a seminar. He recommended adding a second rear sway bar before doing anything else.  I had him install one at that rally. It made a huge difference. I was totally satisfied with the result. I still got a little push from passing trucks, but the push didn't start until the passing truck was just approaching my driver's seat, well forward of where it had been pushing.  The push also wasn't as strong as it had been. That was the only chassis mod I did to that coach. I kept it for 6 years.
Some folks on here will speak of a track bar helping.  I have no experience with those.
 

phil-t

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 10, 2017
Posts
862
Location
Ogdensburg, NY
The aftermarket rear sway bars are an add on. They do not replace the stock bar.  Try it, if you still are not happy add the rear tracbar.  They also have a replacement front sway bar that is substantially heavier.
 

Frank B

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 23, 2005
Posts
1,409
Location
Calgary, Alberta
Sadly, the very common term "anti-sway" can apply (incorrectly) to two types of motion. The most common application is to anti-roll, where the coach tends to 'tip', or roll to one side or the other, as in a turn. These are usually torsion bars mounted on the chassis with each end attached to opposite wheels on the same axle.  The torsion bar reduces the tendency of the coach to roll or lean to one side in a turn.


Another device is a Panhard rod, sometimes referred to as anti-sway or track bar. This is attached to the frame on one side of the axle, and then to the axle on the opposite side. This prevents the axle from shifting sideways on the coach, thereby preventing yaw, or increasing directional or longitudinal stability.


So, it will depend on what type of motion you want to control - roll, or yaw.


One can use both.
 

kdbgoat

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 16, 2014
Posts
6,313
Frank B said:
So, it will depend on what type of motion you want to control - roll, or yaw.


One can use both.

Shouldn't this be posted on the "On the water" board? ;D
 

rider1520

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 15, 2010
Posts
240
Location
Nazareth, Pa
Frank B....I am looking to control or mitigate the first of your statements which is the ?tip of lean? that I experience on uneven roads. One of my main questions was, would adding a rear sway bar alone do much to mitigate the problem.
 

Frank B

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 23, 2005
Posts
1,409
Location
Calgary, Alberta
AFAIK, pretty much all cars/trucks/buses have front anti-roll bars standard. Some have rear as well.


If you want to control roll, then yes, you want more roll resistance. This can be retrofitted with either thicker anti-roll bars, or additional anti-roll bars.  IIUC, front anti-roll bars have a greater effect on total roll resistance than the rear ones.  this is because most vehicles have front-wheel steering, so it is the front end that gets kicked sideways when you turn the wheel. It is this kicking sideways motion of the front wheels that causes the top to tip over in the opposite direction producing roll.


Does your coach / tow vehicle want to change direction when you are being passed, or does it tend to just roll over to one side without changing direction?  If it changes direction, then that is often corrected with a panhard rod.  (Assuming that you have a solid live rear axle, likely mounted on leaf springs.)


I am by no means an expert on suspension systems, and I will willingly accept correction on this. I am just trying to point out that there are different behaviors that can be addressed with different add on options. The term "anti sway" is too imprecise to define a particular device or a particular problem. I am just suggesting that you be aware of this when you talk to a true expert. Make sure that they know the difference, and that they will give you what you really need. Sadly, just like in any other business, there are those that know, and then there are those that only think they know. YOU need to have enough knowledge to tell the difference.
 
Top Bottom