Reference guide for 5th wheel and TT's by weight

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

oldryder

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 8, 2017
Posts
435
Location
Avon MN
We are in the process of downsizing from a 40' DP to a truck and trailer. As part of the research this past summer we twice rented a TT we could pull with my 1/2 ton so we have a good idea of what we want. Learned a lot. 1st step is a bigger truck.

We want to start evaluating trailer models, primarily 5th wheel, and think we want something with at least 2 slides and a GVW< ~11000 lbs as we are not going diesel. The truck will be either a 6.6l or 7.3l gas.

A table or chart listing various models by GVW would be a great place to start assuming something like that exists.

Thx in advance to anyone that has suggestions of how to research this. other comments welcome.

mark in MN
 

UTTransplant

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 20, 2014
Posts
3,608
Location
Cedar Falls, IA
I would decide on basic manufacturer first, then features you want. For example, the last trailer we had, we specifically wanted a trailer built by the Northwoods-related groups in Oregon Due to their well-know four season capability and build quality. Those we’re Nash, Arctic Fox, and Outdoors RV. Then we decided our features - bumper pull instead of fifth wheel, walk around bed, big tanks for boondocking. That eliminated 3/4 of the models. Looked at floor plans and interior detail to decide on Outdoor RV. Then looked at weight. Decided on a 27’ model (total length around 30’). BTW, it fit well within our truck’s specs, but it still wasn’t fun to tow with a 1/2 ton. We ended up with a 3/4 ton RAM diesel, and we were much happier.

Note we didn’t really care for a specific dealer. We always did 95% of “warranty” work ourselves, so we didn’t mind picking a model without lots of local service. We got lucky in that there was a dealer near us with a good reputation, and we bought it there. People who don’t feel comfortable with that approach may have an easy time of picking models their dealer sells.
 

steveblonde

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 8, 2015
Posts
4,660
Location
calgary alberta
i would start by going to


look at the models and specs online build an exel file based on model weight rating etc etc i did that when looking for my last toy hauler. weight wasnt my issue it was looking at the same models over and over on line . the spread sheet allowed to to keep track of what i had seen and liked/disliked, then when i narrowed it down to floor plan and models and rating ( my evaluation, not anything scientific) i narrowed to a dozen models and went out at looked at them all narrowed it down some more and came up with my pricing game - got what i wanted at a price i wanted to pay - not a quick thing lol but i liked the game
 

Western Slope

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 21, 2022
Posts
518
Location
81643, Colorado
The Outdoors RV Mtn Trx Backcountry has an on board generator with a 100 gallon insulated fresh water tank. GVW up to 11,000 lbs. We're able to camp longer into Fall during our 45 to 50F diurnal temperature swings from the below freezing mornings. They provide the specs in their brochures...


Their 5th wheel specs...
FP-GP-Floor-Plans.jpg

I have a Ram 2500 Power Wagon with the 6.4L and 4.10-1 gear ratio. Be aware that non-turbo gasoline engines lose power by 3-4% per 1,000 ft. elevation. To maintain performance, reduce GVWs and GCWs by 2% percent per 1,000 ft. elevation (per the Ford owners manual). Not certain that your going to encounter any of the issues that we faced in our decision due to living at a 6,000 feet elevation. With 7 to 10% grades over our nearby 11,000 feet summit, we do get behind the RV folks every summer doing the 8 to 9 MPH in the 50 speed limit. Probably don't exceed their tow capacity at the lower elevation flatlands either.
 
Last edited:

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Posts
78,181
Location
West Palm Beach, FL
I'm not aware of any list organized by weight, not even within a single manufacturer. You will have to do the searching yourself and build your own list of possibles. 11,000 lbs will probably put you in a 28-30 ft 5W or a 30-34 ft travel trailer. Pin weight is likely the more limiting factor on a 5W - an 11,000 GVWR yields a 5W pin weight in the 2200-2600 lb range. I suspect you will find more truck configurations that can pull 11,000 than can carry 2500.

Be aware that "lite" means the manufacturer skimped on the chassis strength, insulation, flooring, etc to save weight. That's often not evident until you've traveled awhile in it, but there is surely a quality cost for weight reduction.
 

oldryder

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 8, 2017
Posts
435
Location
Avon MN
Thx everyone. Spreadsheet it is. I'm a big time "bring the kitchen sink type" so I'll limit myself to a 1 ton (which gets cheaper plates in MN) to avoid the possibility of overloading the tow vehicle. That also allows me a little more leeway on the trailer weight although I think if I go any bigger than 30' 5th wheel I'm pushing myself into a diesel.
 

scottydl

Site Team
Joined
Jul 1, 2006
Posts
9,026
Location
Land of Lincoln
5th Wheel + Gas Truck is not an equation that often works out well. But, you're welcome to try it. ;) Gary spelled out the reasons why... even if your gas truck has ample "pull weight forward" towing capacity, most of them severely lack "carry downward weight" that 5th wheels require.

If you do all the math and carefully select the truck + trailer combo, you might be okay. Where & how you tow (flat terrain vs. mountains, etc.) will be a big factor too. But there's a reason almost every good-sized 5th wheel you see on the road is being towed by a 1-ton diesel.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

Site Team
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Posts
78,181
Location
West Palm Beach, FL
A big block gas engine truck will haul adequately, but it lacks the low end torque that makes standing starts easy and aids acceleration & hill climbing. But have no fear, you will still pull ok. The bigger issue may be the lack of a diesel exhaust brake, which really helps manage the downhill side. Gas engine braking is nowhere near as effective an a diesel exhaust brake.

The new Ford 7.3LV8 gas engine gets good reviews and should be able to easily handle 12,000 lbs of so when in an F250 or F350 pickup. Check out the towing guides from Ford, Chevy & Ram for their capabilities. Just be aware that as you add upscale trim options and bigger cabs, the tow & haul limits decrease becasue the combined truck and trailer limit is a fixed number. A Lariat trim crew cab F350 is more towing-limited than an XLT Supercab becasue of the greater truck weight.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom