Removing frozen filters

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Tom

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A couple of days ago my travelling companion changed the coolant filter on his coach. He started by using a filter wrench that looks like an oversized nut cracker with handles like a scissors. When it didn't budge, he proceeded to punch a large screwdriver through the filter (something I haven't done for many years) and bent the screwdriver trying to get the filter loose. That's when I came on the scene and offered my strap wrench. But, because the exterior of the filter was now covered in coolant, the strap wrench merely slipped. Finally he went back to the nut cracker and, after a few heaves and grunts, the filter moved. Several grunts later it had moved a quarter of a turn and, after more patience and brute force, it came off.

What should this guy have done differently to remove the frozen filter?
 

Steve CDN

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Tom

The coolant filter is notorious for corroding and seizing to the body making it difficult to remove.  BTW the Air dryer filter on air suspension coaches has the same problem..

Preparation for removal should begin with the installation of the new coolant filter.

Silicone grease and not spray silicone lubricant should be spread on the rubber gaskets provided with the new filter.  Next a small amount of "Never Seize" or equivalent compound should be applied to the threads.  Tightening should be done by hand, with caution not to exceed the 3/4 rule after contact.

Removal should not be attempted with an elastic remover, despite Bob Villa's convincing commercials at 3:00am.

A properly selected metal filter remover, purchased in an upscale or trade supplier toll store will ensure getting the best tool for the job.

My grandfather (bless his soul) told me, Steve, when it comes to tools, if you buy cheap, you get cheap.  Buy the best tools you can afford and shop where the pro's shop for their tools.

 

Tom

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Thanks Steve. My understanding is that the new coolant filter should be installed with oil on the rubber gasket, but the threads should be dry.
 

Ron

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That is correct Tom.  The only filters that I have seen forzen as you described are ones that had been improperly installed, over tightened.    The filter should be tightend only 3/4 turn after gasket contact. Same rule applies to oil and fuel filters too.  I do not recommend using silicon on the threads.
 
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