Should I buy a hybrid RV/boat or just tow a boat behind.

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evagoblog

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Jun 17, 2018
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f anyone reads a lot of different RV forums you will see this posted many places, as I want as many opinions or expertise advice as possible, the subject is so unusual wasn't quite sure where to put it. I was going to purchase an ordinary Class B van when I who have a weakness (I used the word fetish and was told it was NOT the correct word [emoticon]) for unusual house TV shows, was watching a show about houses on the water, and there was an episode on the Caraboat. A couple found it on ebay for $800 and then restored I think the show said for 200K (if you want to see the episode it's on the FYI channel website, season 2 episode 11, not sure if I can post links here) so then I became intrigued with that concept (there are very few of those made in the 70's left, at the first press conference for it, the boats started sinking and the reporters had to be rescued and the designer destroyed all the plans) but coincidentally there are TWO companies that just started making these with both very similar designs, though they are not related. I contacted both, and even though they don't sell in the U.S. now both said they will soon, but don't know when and I want to start RVing NOW. If anyone is curious about them, here are their names which you can google as again, not sure if this site will let me post links, some don't, Caravanboats for the German and Caraboat for the Australian, surprise they used the name of the failed company unless they want it to come up when someone is googling the other!) There is a company called Sealander where the trailers are lighter and they are cheaper (like a Happier Camper LOL) but I have been in contact them for almost TWO years and although the said they would distribute in North America and were having a tour here, they never did and their link to US sales is down. There IS an American made product the Terra Wind, on sale in the U.S. but like many American products (moderator if you take umbrage I will remove the last sentence) it's too big, expensive and over the top!

A friend of mine suggested that I just buy a truck or van and PULL a regular boat that you can live in (can be cheaper as of now, in USD the German boat is 70K range and the Australian in the 90K range) and so now, finally the question, after this long winded introduction, can that be done, will RV campsites or the county.state, federal parks allow it-actually living on the boat on land (only problem is can't stealth camp).

Don't know if anyone ever thought or tried it, hope so as don't want to contact every campsite. I know people will have their jokes etc.but I am serious about it, so even if people haven't tried it but can think of the pros and cons, I'd like their opinions also.
 

evagoblog

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Jun 17, 2018
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I should add that I would also use the boat in the water which is the whole point, that I can use it both ways.
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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Hard to say. How much boat do you need to be livable?  That sort of determines how to tow it.

Frankly, I've not seen a RV/boat hybrid that was more than a curiosity, something to amaze the public but not practical as either a boat or an RV. Heck, RVs leak bad enough on land without trying to float one!

Are you looking at the German Sealander?  That's a towable RV (caravan, or "travel trailer in US jargon), right?  That seems way to small to live in, but maybe you are more adptable than I. Does it have a bathroom and holding tanks?  A galley to cook in? Fridge?

http://sealander.de/wp-content/uploads/140822_Sealander-Broschu%CC%88re_Vorschau.pdf

The Departure 1 seems a bit more reasonable in size and facilities, but of course much more expensive.  Plus it would have to be converted for US electric power and adapted to US highway specs.  I don't know where you could get a vanilla boat & trailer that had live-aboard facilities for any less than the Departure 1, though.
https://www.motor1.com/news/265523/departure-one-camper-boat/
 

SeilerBird

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RVs have enough problems as it is. I can't imagine how many problems you would have with one that got put into water. Especially salt water.
 

Isaac-1

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Interesting, though I don't get the appeal of having it on the water, and would be very concerned about being in it if the wind picked up like what happened recently in Branson MO with the tourist being killed on the Duck boat tour.
 

grashley

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John saved me looking for the video he posted.  Thanks!!

Personally, a Motor Home (any class) towing a boat makes a lot more sense to me.  Get a vehicle meant to be an RV to live in,  and a vehicle meant for fun in the water to tow behind the RV.
 

FunSteak

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NE Illinois
Cool idea, but in my experience, when you have an item like this marketed to be "multi-purpose", it usually stinks equally at each purpose.

Take the "Amphicar" from the 60s.  Really cool idea, but was a terrible car AND a terrible boat.  There's a reason you don't/didn't see many.  I actually met a guy who owns one, and saw him out on the lakes near us.  Told me he only takes it out a time or two a year, as it's constantly needing repair, handles horribly on the road, leaks like a sieve, and is rather scary on the water, too.

Obviously technology is much better nowadays, but I'd still be inclined to be VERY careful about trusting this sort of thing.

If your RV breaks down, you pull over.  Now, if your RV/Boat is a few miles out in a big lake, imagine how fast that thing would go down if there were problems. 
 

ChasA

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Last winter a truck pulling a 30 to 35 foot cruiser on a trailer came into the campground.  The guy used a ladder to get up into the boat. He lived in his boat and when he'd trailer it, it was his RV.
 

Hanr3

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Central Illinois
There are more practical options to a boat/car.

Buy a houseboat and trailer it. When you get to the lake, launch and live on it. Ready to move, pull anchor and trailer it to the next destination. I haven't found a lake yet that charges camping fees for a houseboat.  :) :) :) :)


 

Isaac-1

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SW Louisiana
Another thing no one has brought up is, where would one get that thing serviced other than the factory?
 

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