Some gas-related questions about 1985-1990 Ford Eco 350 with Jamboree Conversion

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XJO

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Helle together,

my girl and me have the crazy idea to buy and import a 85-90 Ford Motorhome with a Jamboree Conversion to Germany.
After a research of the market, compared with the possible sizes for our streets and my parking lot... we came to the result that a maximum of 26" is the right size for us.
Both of us love the looking and Florplan of the Jamboree RVs, so I am focused just on them ;-)

I bought in the last years already some cars from CA, so the main job is not as difficult.
My questions to you are pointing to the gas-installation of this RVs, as we are very regulated in the EU to get these things street legal.
Could you do me a favor and support me with some informations, what kind of heater, water heater, stove and oven and fridge is common in these ones?
Important to me is also, what the standard working pressure of you gas systems is normally.
Here we have a pressure used at 0,36-0,40 PSI in the gas system.

Thanks for any comment, as I have to plan the new setup.
Regards Joe
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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American-made RVs, including the Jamboree, use LP (Liquified Petroleum) gas appliances.  Usually just called propane, though it may be a blend of propane and other gases.  The storage tanks conform to either US DOT specs (for portable bottles) or ASME specs for fixed installations. The Jamboree has a fixed tank, so will be ASME spec.  I've not heard of any European regulatory issues with either type, but check on that.  NOTE: US DOT = US Department of Transportation; ASME = American Society of Mechanical Engineers. These organizations are the American standards authorities for gas storage tanks and they probably have International Standards (ISO) standing as well.

The storage tanks operate at very high pressure, whatever the ambient temperature generates from the expanding propane. Often around 300 psi. There will be a gas pressure regulator close to the storage tank that reduces that to a working pressure of 11 Water Column Inches, which is close to 0.5 psi.

The appliances are typically dual gas/electric or gas only. The furnace and stove/oven will be gas only, but the fridge will be able to use either gas or US standard electric (mains) power at 120vac and 60 Hz.  The water heater may be gas only or gas/electric like the fridge, depending on year and model of RV.  You are probably aware of the difference between US and European mains power, so I won't go into that.
In the USA, the RVIA (RV Industry Association) is the standards-setting authority for RV construction, so you may want to become familiar with their specs. You may have to buy copies if you need the details.  See https://www.rvia.org/standards-regulations/standards-compliance/association-and-ansi-standards
The RVIA has adopted other existing American standards for many things, including gas, plumbing,and fire safety. In this case NFPA 1192 standard applies. NFPA = National Fire Protection Association, the American standards body for those subjects. A copy of NFPA 1192 runs around US$56.00 
Note that standards can change over time and you could be required to bring an older US model up to current standards when importing.  I don't think there has been much change in gas-related stuff in the past 25-30 years, but be aware of the possibility.
 

XJO

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Oct 7, 2009
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Hello Gary and thanks for your answer.

The main power is not Part of my thinking, the difference in your 120VAC and our 230Vac is clear.
We have just some funny people who judge about street legal or not called T?V...
They have some Laws to follow, one of the said, I am not allowed tu use a oven without a flame-detector as it was installed in my old Dodge.
The Flame-detector switches close the gasline, if the Flame of the oven goes off.
If the oven and stove of a 1985 Jamboree has this flame-detector, I am allowed to use it here in Germany too.
Same for the heater and water heater. So if somebody could tell me that these parts are equipped normally with these security functions, I would be happy and could save some money ;-)

BTW. Could someone give me some links for RV accessories Stores? Would like to compare the available gas-units in the US to our ones. Have the feeling there could be some bugs between.

Thanks Joe
 

donn

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What your calling a flame detector over here we call a thermalcouple.  This is a standard feature on any appliance that has a standing pilot light.  In other words, the over and water heater,  refer, and possibly the furnace.  These items you would usually match light turn the valve to on.  When you get ready to go, turn the valve off, which stops gas flow.  The function of the thermalcouple is to provide milivolts to the valve.  No current no gas flow.  Converting to 220 50Hz should be fairly simple.  Add a 2 to 1 transformer just ahead of the converter to drop your euro voltage to US standard 120VAC.  The only downside that may cause a problem that I see could be the refer control board.
Hope that helps?
Camping world.com is not really the best, but is one of the largest.
 

XJO

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Hey donn,

I guess my bad spelling makes my question a bit difficult. I understand what you are talking about, but that is not the same what I meant.

If you start your stove, you have to turn and push the knob till the ignition starts and hold it for a moment to become hot, then you release the knob.
When wind comes on and blows off the flame of the stove, the Flame-detector ?realize? this and shut off the gas line automatically.
It is a non electric unit, it used a kind of bimetall or a heatrelated Fluid to switch the Gas-valve.

Hope this is more easy to understand, sorry for my English...
 

donn

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Same thing.  They are not used on stove tops though.  Stove tops do not have a standing pilot to ignite the main burner.  We find these only on water hetaers, furnaces, ovens and refrigators.
BTW what part of GDR do you live?  Worked 17 years for a company located in Binerach anRiss
 

TheBar

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The thermalcouple in that age RV will not have any electrical connections. It will be found on any appliance with a pilot light and does exactly what you described. It has to heat up first before turning on the gas and if the flame goes out it cuts off the gas.
 

XJO

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Donn, that is funny! My father was born in Biberach an der Riss!
I live bout 500km higher close to the Netherlands border, where are you located in the US?

@theBar, could you point a date when the pilot lights are introduced or become standard?
I just know that my 1975 Tradesman didn?t had these, what let me think that I have to replace some units in a 85-90 RV but I have no clue IF ;-)
 

donn

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Had a 1972 trailer and it had thermalcouples on everything.
We live in western Oregon.
Visited the factory, Vollmer Werke several times.  Always loved the region around Biberach.
 

XJO

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I know just a small area in CA where I was a few times. Riverside, Orange County, Chino and Los Angeles of course ;-)

Will ask someone who has to sell one if it has a thermocouple, thanks for the help so far!
 

TheBar

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XJO said:
@theBar, could you point a date when the pilot lights are introduced or become standard?
I just know that my 1975 Tradesman didn?t had these, what let me think that I have to replace some units in a 85-90 RV but I have no clue IF ;-)

I'm surprised your 1975 model didn't have thermocouples on appliances with pilot lights but it may depend on the manufacturer. The stovetop burners would not typically have them, just the oven, refrigerator, water heater, and furnace. When I was young my dad's 1967 trailer had them even on the interior propane globe lights which have been illegal for many years. 
 

XJO

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Many thanks for that, in this case I just have to change the stove and could use everything else!
If I had to change something else will not kill me, but the WOF is much higher if I can say, just the stove ?must? be changed, the other units just if they are broken ;-)
 

Gary RV_Wizard

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When wind comes on and blows off the flame of the stove, the Flame-detector ?realize? this and shut off the gas line automatically.
US standards have the same requirement and the gas burner in the oven, water heater, furnace and fridge all have that safety device. Even in a 1985 model.  Only the stovetop burners lack it, whether the stovetop is in an RV or a house.

The ignition sensor (flame verification) is included on gas appliances with pilot lights or with DSI (Direct Spark Ignition). Makes no difference how the flame gets lit - if either the burner or the pilot goes out, the gas flow gets shut off.

If you want to look at the operation and circuitry, check out the service manuals for various RV gas appliances available at http://bryantrv.com/docs.html
 

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