Storing an RV in extreme heat.

The friendliest place on the web for anyone with an RV or an interest in RVing!
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

dpales

New member
Joined
Jun 21, 2021
Posts
2
Location
Utah
We live in southern Ut. and the temperatures here in the summer are around 110-115 degrees. When we are not using our 5th wheel it is stored outside. The inside temperature is around 110 degrees. I worry about our appliances sitting in that high of temperatures day in and out. Any ideas?
 

Rene T

Site Team
Joined
May 20, 2011
Posts
17,616
Location
Farmington NH
Make sure your roof vents are open. Do you have the vent covers? You should because if it rains, you can leave the vents open and rain will not get in.
 

Arch Hoagland

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 11, 2014
Posts
3,768
Location
Clovis California
111 here today, triple digit temperatures are common for three months out of the year here in Central California. I've seen 120 inside my coach.

I keep the windows and roof vents open and an exterior windshield cover on along with all curtains drawn. My two toilets always have water in the bowl otherwise the rubber seals will start to leak.

It's been like this for the past 14 years and all has held up fine with the heat.
 

UTTransplant

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 20, 2014
Posts
2,689
Location
Cedar Falls, IA
Agree with Rene about opening the vents if they have covers (and they should). Close up all the blinds and windows, and put cushions in the skylights. Then you just have to live with the results. We lived in SLC, not as hot as St. George or Moab, but still regularly over 100 in the summer. It is what it is, unless you can get into covered storage.
 

Lou Schneider

Site Team
Joined
Mar 14, 2005
Posts
10,951
Put saran wrap over the toilet bowl to keep the water from evaporating. Run about a gallon of water into the black and grey tanks to keep the drain valves submerged so they don't dry out. Run water through all of the drains to fill the P-traps and then close the sink drains and put something over the shower drain so the P-traps don't evaporate and let tank odors into the rig. If you're in a dry climate, leave out a couple pails of water to add some humidity to the air so the wood doesn't dry out and crack.
 

TheBar

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 25, 2018
Posts
1,070
Location
MS
In Utah at elevation your overnight lows are around 70 or less? Other than leaving some liquid in the black and grey tanks I would leave it closed up to reduce temperature and humidity changes. 110 isn't going to do any damage but 40+ degree temperature changes every day and night will cause a lot of expansion and contraction.
 

Rene T

Site Team
Joined
May 20, 2011
Posts
17,616
Location
Farmington NH
Good idea about adding water to your toilet but I do something that’s easier than Saran Wrap. After putting a little water in the traps and toilet, just add about 1/4 cup of vegetable oil to the toilet and a couple of teaspoons to the traps. That will stop evaporation. As far as the tanks I’d add 15 or 20 gallons to them. One gallon and the water may not touch the seal all the way around.
 

dpales

New member
Joined
Jun 21, 2021
Posts
2
Location
Utah
In Utah at elevation your overnight lows are around 70 or less? Other than leaving some liquid in the black and grey tanks I would leave it closed up to reduce temperature and humidity changes. 110 isn't going to do any damage but 40+ degree temperature changes every day and night will cause a lot of expansion and contraction.
Yeah, in Southern Ut. we are lucky to see 85 over night this time of year. But, we do go to the mountains frequently for our relief! Thanks for your help.
 
Top Bottom